Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5555251 times)

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stitchygreyanonymouse

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22140 on: July 09, 2013, 10:46:09 AM »
My flabber is officially gasted. Where is the hospital at in all of this? Why aren't the nurses or administrators handling the fact that there are five unaccompanied minors in the labor and delivery ward?

Pen^2

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22141 on: July 09, 2013, 10:50:13 AM »
Came across 2 of the biggest snowflakes in history last night. My best friend went into labor with her first child last night. Her niece (16yo) had previously asked BF if she could be at the hospital when the baby was born and BF said yes to her but not to any of the younger nieces/nephews. DN walks into the hospital room last night with her 2 friends, her younger sister (13yo) and brother (12yo). Their mom did not come in. She dropped these 5 kids off to stay the night with BF in labor while she went home to sleep. When BF's twin sister called and told her to come back and get the kids, she pitched a major fit saying she was too tired to drive back up there and get the kids. The kids started arguing and it was agitating BF so I kicked them all out of the room. BF sighed a big Thank You. When I went back this morning to check on BF before work, the kids were back in the room, asleep on the couches, floor and window sill - their mom still had not shown up to get the kids.

The other snowflake was the 13yo DN demanding to be allowed to stay in the room during delivery. BF's DH finally lost his temper and told her "You weren't there when we made this baby, you won't be there when she's born!!" A few more foot stomps and arguments but she finally left to pout in the waiting room.

BF is begging for a C-section just so it will be over and everybody will go home.  :-\

Holy cow, that's awful. Someone is about to have major surgery and give birth, and these people think this means their kids get a free sleep over in the delivery room? Directly against the needs of those involved? Disgusting. I would have told them to leave once, given them no longer than exactly one minute to collect whatever junk they'd brought with them and vamoose, and then immediately called security if they weren't out or if they returned at any point without being invited in advance. Sorry, but laboring lady comes first and it is not the time or place to argue. Here is the rule. Follow it or suffer the stated consequences. It is non-negotiable. You want to get upset and sook about it? Awesome, we'll have a fantastic new baby to keep us company in your place.

Good luck to BF. If this is what it's like before the delivery, unfortunately, it's going to get a hundred times worse over the next few weeks. He'll need to be strong, because the new mother's likely to be exhausted.

Seven Ate Nine

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22142 on: July 09, 2013, 10:51:22 AM »
Holy cow!  I am due next week (though the way I've been feeling she might make a slightly earlier appearance) and there is no freaking way I'd be able to deal with that.  Honestly after hearing that their mother didn't want to pick them up I'd be looking into my options to call the police about abandoned minors.

gramma dishes

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22143 on: July 09, 2013, 11:10:22 AM »
I can't imagine the mother even THINKING of leaving a bunch of kids (a couple of which were not even HERS!!) in the hospital room of someone in labor.  What?  Did she adopt all her own kids and doesn't have a clue what labor and delivery are like? 

I'm also amazed that the hospital staff didn't turn them around at the door and send them home -- immediately.  I honestly don't think our hospital would have tolerated this for a minute!

Your poor friend.  Hope all goes well for her and that her baby comes into the world quietly and with the privacy this family deserves.

Shalamar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22144 on: July 09, 2013, 11:14:10 AM »
Speaking of dogs in inappropriate places, a while back my husband arrived at his office and smelt an unmistakeable odor in the air.  Turns out that a co-worker had brought his dog into the office the night before and let the dog just run around doing whatever while he was working.  The dog did its business on the carpet, and the co-worker either didn't notice or didn't care.

ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22145 on: July 09, 2013, 11:40:18 AM »
When I first started working in my current office, we had a woman that was an admin assistant for a executive. She was extremely SS, refused to ever participate in any event thrown by employees, but would get her feelings hurt if we didn't have a birthday party for her. She had calamity after calamity happen outside work and started bringing her poodle into work. It was never approved, but she kept doing it, in between leave periods, until finally the administration made her leave a permanent situation.

Her dog would bark often, and it was very loud even with the door shut.

Winterlight

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22146 on: July 09, 2013, 11:41:10 AM »
At my dad's workplace, people were allowed to bring their dogs in. The dogs behaved well, everyone was happy. Then one day an order came down from on high banning all non-service pets from the building. Dad was told that somebody's dog had left messes all down the main hall over the weekend. The owner, whoever it was, hadn't bothered to clean up any of it- it was left for maintence to deal with. The building head's assistant was chummy with maintence, so the word made it to boss in no short order. One jerk wrecked it for everyone.
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ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22147 on: July 09, 2013, 11:48:56 AM »
Our SS neighbors.   >:(

We had a group of adults (at least two men and two women) and kids (at least two) move in across the street back in April. One of them runs a daycare out of her 2 bedroom, 1200 sq feet townhouse. This wouldn't affect us, but the parents have to park in front of her unit, and they double park nearly every day during the highest traffic times for the residents.

The group of adults likes to hang out in front of their garage in their underwear. They like to talk loudly outside (while in their underwear) on their mobile phones from 10 PM to 1 AM every night. They like to eat fast food while outside in their underwear talking on the phone, then leave the mess where it is, and it blows across to all the neighbors. Little things like empty ketchup packets up to large bags and packaging. Every morning, I find more and more garbage in the street.  ::)

Bexx27

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22148 on: July 09, 2013, 11:50:57 AM »
Came across 2 of the biggest snowflakes in history last night. My best friend went into labor with her first child last night. Her niece (16yo) had previously asked BF if she could be at the hospital when the baby was born and BF said yes to her but not to any of the younger nieces/nephews. DN walks into the hospital room last night with her 2 friends, her younger sister (13yo) and brother (12yo). Their mom did not come in. She dropped these 5 kids off to stay the night with BF in labor while she went home to sleep. When BF's twin sister called and told her to come back and get the kids, she pitched a major fit saying she was too tired to drive back up there and get the kids. The kids started arguing and it was agitating BF so I kicked them all out of the room. BF sighed a big Thank You. When I went back this morning to check on BF before work, the kids were back in the room, asleep on the couches, floor and window sill - their mom still had not shown up to get the kids.

The other snowflake was the 13yo DN demanding to be allowed to stay in the room during delivery. BF's DH finally lost his temper and told her "You weren't there when we made this baby, you won't be there when she's born!!" A few more foot stomps and arguments but she finally left to pout in the waiting room.

BF is begging for a C-section just so it will be over and everybody will go home.  :-\


edited because I do know the difference between there and their

 :o Where are you located? My hospital would not allow children into the maternity ward with the exception of soon-to-be siblings. Other than medical personnel, only the father and one other person designated by the mother were allowed in the delivery room. More people could visit in the recovery room, but only the father could stay overnight. And the room certainly didn't have couches for people to hang out!
How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these. -George Washington Carver

kherbert05

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22149 on: July 09, 2013, 12:04:08 PM »
Came across 2 of the biggest snowflakes in history last night. My best friend went into labor with her first child last night. Her niece (16yo) had previously asked BF if she could be at the hospital when the baby was born and BF said yes to her but not to any of the younger nieces/nephews. DN walks into the hospital room last night with her 2 friends, her younger sister (13yo) and brother (12yo). Their mom did not come in. She dropped these 5 kids off to stay the night with BF in labor while she went home to sleep. When BF's twin sister called and told her to come back and get the kids, she pitched a major fit saying she was too tired to drive back up there and get the kids. The kids started arguing and it was agitating BF so I kicked them all out of the room. BF sighed a big Thank You. When I went back this morning to check on BF before work, the kids were back in the room, asleep on the couches, floor and window sill - their mom still had not shown up to get the kids.

The other snowflake was the 13yo DN demanding to be allowed to stay in the room during delivery. BF's DH finally lost his temper and told her "You weren't there when we made this baby, you won't be there when she's born!!" A few more foot stomps and arguments but she finally left to pout in the waiting room.

BF is begging for a C-section just so it will be over and everybody will go home.  :-\


edited because I do know the difference between there and their
If they are still there have all the kids call their parents they have average travel time from their home to hospital - 10 minutes to pick up the kids or the cops will be called and the children turned over as abandoned and the parents can deal with CPS to get the kids back. You would be amazed how fast that gets lazy cell donors to move.

Why in the world did someone not call the friends' parents and tell them their children were dropped off unsupervised in the maternity ward? There is a good chance they think those kids are at the home of their friend.
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Pen^2

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22150 on: July 09, 2013, 12:04:46 PM »
When I was a child, the school nurse had a large dog that she brought to work. It wasn't approved, but even if it was, I don't think it's remotely appropriate to have a pet in a nurse's office with sick children. There were complaints, of course, but this woman was so SS that she would turn up late to work so no other staff would see her arrive, and bring the dog in anyway. Clearly they had a problem with hiring someone new, although I don't know why.

Us students were aware of the problem. Those of us who were unfortunate enough to have dog allergies (more common than you'd think, it turns out) would have trouble approaching the nurse for anything. She always dismissed any requests to perhaps not be standing next to a large, fluffy, allergy-causing animal as, "oh, he's not bothering anyone!" despite being told that he very much was just by being present. One girl in my year couldn't walk directly past this woman's office and had to take a detour just because the presence of dog hair alone was enough to set her off, so strong were her allergies.

Usually we'd just convince a friend to feign illness and transfer the bandaids, aspirin, etc. to us afterwards. This involved fake tablet-swallowing in front of this nurse, and an almost black market-level of trade of medical goods, not to mention very poor first aid done by children on other children, attempting to copy what they'd seen the nurse do. Whenever I see prison films where they trade with cigarettes, I know just what it's like.

This SS woman put her dog in front of the very children she was hired to care for. And caused a lot of unnecessary unsafe and medically-unsound activity in the school.

Shoo

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22151 on: July 09, 2013, 12:05:17 PM »
I'm also wondering what the heck kind of hospital this is.  I've never been to a maternity ward where children who weren't the patient's were even allowed in the labor room.  Let alone a group of children alone, unsupervised, just dropped off and left to fend for themselves.  Where on earth were the nurses during this time?

stargazer

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22152 on: July 09, 2013, 12:33:59 PM »
Came across 2 of the biggest snowflakes in history last night. My best friend went into labor with her first child last night. Her niece (16yo) had previously asked BF if she could be at the hospital when the baby was born and BF said yes to her but not to any of the younger nieces/nephews. DN walks into the hospital room last night with her 2 friends, her younger sister (13yo) and brother (12yo). Their mom did not come in. She dropped these 5 kids off to stay the night with BF in labor while she went home to sleep. When BF's twin sister called and told her to come back and get the kids, she pitched a major fit saying she was too tired to drive back up there and get the kids. The kids started arguing and it was agitating BF so I kicked them all out of the room. BF sighed a big Thank You. When I went back this morning to check on BF before work, the kids were back in the room, asleep on the couches, floor and window sill - their mom still had not shown up to get the kids.

The other snowflake was the 13yo DN demanding to be allowed to stay in the room during delivery. BF's DH finally lost his temper and told her "You weren't there when we made this baby, you won't be there when she's born!!" A few more foot stomps and arguments but she finally left to pout in the waiting room.

BF is begging for a C-section just so it will be over and everybody will go home.  :-\


edited because I do know the difference between there and their

 :o Where are you located? My hospital would not allow children into the maternity ward with the exception of soon-to-be siblings. Other than medical personnel, only the father and one other person designated by the mother were allowed in the delivery room. More people could visit in the recovery room, but only the father could stay overnight. And the room certainly didn't have couches for people to hang out!

This.  I have never heard of a hospital allowing this, ESPECIALLY in the maternity ward.  And couches?

3angels

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22153 on: July 09, 2013, 12:55:53 PM »
Came across 2 of the biggest snowflakes in history last night. My best friend went into labor with her first child last night. Her niece (16yo) had previously asked BF if she could be at the hospital when the baby was born and BF said yes to her but not to any of the younger nieces/nephews. DN walks into the hospital room last night with her 2 friends, her younger sister (13yo) and brother (12yo). Their mom did not come in. She dropped these 5 kids off to stay the night with BF in labor while she went home to sleep. When BF's twin sister called and told her to come back and get the kids, she pitched a major fit saying she was too tired to drive back up there and get the kids. The kids started arguing and it was agitating BF so I kicked them all out of the room. BF sighed a big Thank You. When I went back this morning to check on BF before work, the kids were back in the room, asleep on the couches, floor and window sill - their mom still had not shown up to get the kids.

The other snowflake was the 13yo DN demanding to be allowed to stay in the room during delivery. BF's DH finally lost his temper and told her "You weren't there when we made this baby, you won't be there when she's born!!" A few more foot stomps and arguments but she finally left to pout in the waiting room.

BF is begging for a C-section just so it will be over and everybody will go home.  :-\


edited because I do know the difference between there and their

 :o Where are you located? My hospital would not allow children into the maternity ward with the exception of soon-to-be siblings. Other than medical personnel, only the father and one other person designated by the mother were allowed in the delivery room. More people could visit in the recovery room, but only the father could stay overnight. And the room certainly didn't have couches for people to hang out!

This.  I have never heard of a hospital allowing this, ESPECIALLY in the maternity ward.  And couches?

We are in Texas and the hospital has a maternity suite - your entire stay is in one big room so there is a sleeper sofa for Dad and lots of room. Last night's nurse did say something at one point about the extra people but she didn't make anybody leave. Grandma kept the kids occupied in the waiting room as much as she could but there were 3 other families in there and it was crowded. The day nurse for today was awesome - as soon as she walked in and saw the kids she said they had to go cause they were about to start rockin' n' rollin! She definitely was not afraid to step on toes or hurt feelings.

Jocelyn

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22154 on: July 09, 2013, 02:42:58 PM »


This is a huge pet peeve of mine.  In my area, people take advantage of the law and every dog apparently is a "service dog".  When I see them in Macy's, it bugs me, but I can ignore it.  But when I see people walking their dogs in the grocery store, YUCK!  And yes, I'm 99% sure most of these dogs are not service dogs. I have worked with dog trainers and rescue groups.  I can spot a well-trained dog. 

Many of these animals are 'therapy dogs'...that is, someone has decided that having the animal around constantly is in some way therapeutic for this person. The movement started legitimately, with therapists recognizing the human-animal bond's potential for soothing people with social anxiety, and for grounding people with issues with reality testing. I think most of us who have pets have experienced relief from anxiety, worries and sorrow while interacting with our pets. But a great many people have generalized that into a need to carry a pet around wherever they go.  While their issues may or may not meet the criteria for a mental disorder,  many of these people have difficulties relating to other humans, so that the stores are reluctant to engage in an argument with them about their therapy monkey, parrot or pot-bellied pig.

However, if the store IS willing to engage, there are specific legal definitions of 'service animal'. Basically the animal must be trained to perform a specific function, and the owner must be incapable of performing that function for himself. Seeing Eye dog, check. A service monkey assisting a person with quadroplegia, check.  The kitten you just got at the Humane Society? Nope. Not even if it makes you feel happy to pet its soft fur.  It is not trained to do anything, AND it's hard to meet the burden of proof that you absolutely cannot soothe yourself without petting this particular cat. Lawsuits have been won on this point, and it's legal for stores, airlines and other public accommodations to demand documentation of the animal's training before permitting it on the premises.