Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 4386202 times)

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Katana_Geldar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22350 on: July 20, 2013, 10:27:52 PM »
I've been at my new job less than three weeks, and have already found a Special Snowflake there...

I gave a presentation on the company dress code this past Friday, since there have been some changes recently.  Most people took it well--including the prohibition on open-toed shoes for safety reasons.

One CW, however, complained that HER feet had Special Neeeeeeeeeeeeds and she would HAVE to wear "flip-flops"even though they were specifically not allowed.  (No sympathy from me--I also happen to have hard-to-fit feet, and the dress code allows for a wide range of shoes that aren't beach sandals and that someone with this CW's Special Neeeeeeeeeeeds could comfortably wear!)
The only reason people need to wear open shoes at work is health reasons. Like a broken toe, or something.

Liliane

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22351 on: July 20, 2013, 11:11:24 PM »
My sister feels like a special snowflake because her boss actually relaxed the dress code for her - now she can come to work in her slippers, if need be.

Thing is, she's in renal failure. Her feet and legs keep swelling so much she can't actually WEAR shoes. Her boss, who is the most awesome and understanding man on the face of the planet, told her right off not to worry, that she could do what made her comfortable and capable of working instead of having to suffer or even quit her job.

Why is it that the people who genuinely need things like this feel like SSes, while the real SSes think they're entitled to it?  :-\
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TeamBhakta

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22352 on: July 21, 2013, 12:21:47 AM »
I've been at my new job less than three weeks, and have already found a Special Snowflake there...

I gave a presentation on the company dress code this past Friday, since there have been some changes recently.  Most people took it well--including the prohibition on open-toed shoes for safety reasons.

One CW, however, complained that HER feet had Special Neeeeeeeeeeeeds and she would HAVE to wear "flip-flops"even though they were specifically not allowed.  (No sympathy from me--I also happen to have hard-to-fit feet, and the dress code allows for a wide range of shoes that aren't beach sandals and that someone with this CW's Special Neeeeeeeeeeeds could comfortably wear!)
The only reason people need to wear open shoes at work is health reasons. Like a broken toe, or something.

I think I mentioned this before, but I once overheard a Subway restaurant worker complaining about "Ugh, my feet hurt. I asked my manager if I could work barefoot and she said no. I even offered to wear socks on my feet but she still wouldn't let me. So unfair." 

Waterlight

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22353 on: July 21, 2013, 01:05:48 AM »
I've been at my new job less than three weeks, and have already found a Special Snowflake there...

I gave a presentation on the company dress code this past Friday, since there have been some changes recently.  Most people took it well--including the prohibition on open-toed shoes for safety reasons.

One CW, however, complained that HER feet had Special Neeeeeeeeeeeeds and she would HAVE to wear "flip-flops"even though they were specifically not allowed.  (No sympathy from me--I also happen to have hard-to-fit feet, and the dress code allows for a wide range of shoes that aren't beach sandals and that someone with this CW's Special Neeeeeeeeeeeds could comfortably wear!)
The only reason people need to wear open shoes at work is health reasons. Like a broken toe, or something.

I think I mentioned this before, but I once overheard a Subway restaurant worker complaining about "Ugh, my feet hurt. I asked my manager if I could work barefoot and she said no. I even offered to wear socks on my feet but she still wouldn't let me. So unfair."

Current co-irker's situation is more like the Subway restaurant worker's--no broken toe or serious medical condition preventing her from wearing closed-toe shoes.  My boss and I suggested several different kinds of shoes she could wear that would be comfortable and not too expensive--and I even suggested a shoe store specializing in "comfort shoes"--but she kept complaining.   ::)
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Iris

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22354 on: July 21, 2013, 02:05:55 AM »
I've been at my new job less than three weeks, and have already found a Special Snowflake there...

I gave a presentation on the company dress code this past Friday, since there have been some changes recently.  Most people took it well--including the prohibition on open-toed shoes for safety reasons.

One CW, however, complained that HER feet had Special Neeeeeeeeeeeeds and she would HAVE to wear "flip-flops"even though they were specifically not allowed.  (No sympathy from me--I also happen to have hard-to-fit feet, and the dress code allows for a wide range of shoes that aren't beach sandals and that someone with this CW's Special Neeeeeeeeeeeds could comfortably wear!)
The only reason people need to wear open shoes at work is health reasons. Like a broken toe, or something.

I think I mentioned this before, but I once overheard a Subway restaurant worker complaining about "Ugh, my feet hurt. I asked my manager if I could work barefoot and she said no. I even offered to wear socks on my feet but she still wouldn't let me. So unfair."

Current co-irker's situation is more like the Subway restaurant worker's--no broken toe or serious medical condition preventing her from wearing closed-toe shoes.  My boss and I suggested several different kinds of shoes she could wear that would be comfortable and not too expensive--and I even suggested a shoe store specializing in "comfort shoes"--but she kept complaining.   ::)

Well, in fairness the Subway worker MAY have had something wrong that just wasn't that obvious.

A while back I got severe, really severe, blisters on my heels. As in couldn't wear shoes without pain for almost a month severe. The first two weeks were luckily holidays but when I went back to work I simply explained the situation and the boss had no problems. Technically I *could* have worn shoes as the pain would have been bearable if unpleasant, but it would have made the healing process a lot longer.
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Jocelyn

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22355 on: July 21, 2013, 12:20:25 PM »


I think I mentioned this before, but I once overheard a Subway restaurant worker complaining about "Ugh, my feet hurt. I asked my manager if I could work barefoot and she said no. I even offered to wear socks on my feet but she still wouldn't let me. So unfair."
Reminds me of my dad's story from the Navy- he was the chief cook on a troop transport (cooking for 22,000+). One of his cooks decided that it was just too hot on the Equator, so he showed up for duty wearing an apron in the front and an apron in the back, and that was all. My father quickly informed him that the Navy really was serious about everyone wearing those pesky uniforms.

Jocelyn

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22356 on: July 21, 2013, 12:29:07 PM »
Well, in fairness the Subway worker MAY have had something wrong that just wasn't that obvious.

A while back I got severe, really severe, blisters on my heels. As in couldn't wear shoes without pain for almost a month severe. The first two weeks were luckily holidays but when I went back to work I simply explained the situation and the boss had no problems. Technically I *could* have worn shoes as the pain would have been bearable if unpleasant, but it would have made the healing process a lot longer.

My sister imprudently walked home from the pool when we were kids- her flipflops broke, and she threw them away partway home. She really blistered her feet. Mom made her shoes out of foam rubber and fabric. My sister couldn't walk at all without padding.
When I was in grad school, I developed plantar fascitis, and had to replace all my shoes. As the previous poster suggested, I went to a 'comfort shoe' store. It was expensive, but going barefoot just wasn't an option.  I think the aforementioned SS really was a SS if she was refusing to consider buying different shoes, especially when there are shoes designed to assist with foot problems.

MissRose

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22357 on: July 21, 2013, 01:22:55 PM »
I have issues with my feet from time to time.  I still wear shoes to work, and we are allowed to wear tennis shoes as we have a casual dress code but flip flops are still not allowed unless you did something like break a bone or something in your foot or ankle (but some people do get away with it if a manager does not notice).  I would NEVER wear slippers to work and never walk around the office barefoot or in stocking feet, but only do so when I am working from home where I do not wear shoes and/or socks

KenveeB

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22358 on: July 21, 2013, 02:33:40 PM »
I once hobbled around work for a while with a regular black flat on one foot and a black slipper on the other. A car had run over my foot, and it was too swollen to put a shoe on it! But even then I didn't go with flip-flops -- I tried to get something that blended as well as possible. Some people didn't even realize I was wearing a slipper. :)

bloo

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22359 on: July 21, 2013, 05:49:57 PM »
At KMart tonight.  An older woman rammed her cart into another shopper - hard enough to move the other woman's cart back into her body and says "Tall. Get me that." the woman who had been slammed into said "No." and walked away. The woman who needed something reached then went and complained to someone else that the other woman would not help her.  There were three clerks that she could have asked, had she bothered.

Tall Shopper handled that flake-attack quite well!

Rohanna

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22360 on: July 21, 2013, 06:11:02 PM »
If someone very short or otherwise unable asks me to get something not over-heavy/awkward or otherwise dangerous to get down ....and they ask *politely* I really don't mind putting my height to use. I would object to being barked at or ordered around. As it is, generally speaking an "Excuse me but could you reach the pudding mix for me dear" has never failed for the many folk who've asked me nicely.
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GreenEyedHawk

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22361 on: July 21, 2013, 06:29:25 PM »
Anthony is the same...he's tall with a long wingspan so he can reach just about anything.  If someone needs him to reach something, he's always happy to help as long as he's asked politely.
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rose red

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22362 on: July 21, 2013, 06:46:32 PM »
Went to a restaurant where you bus your own table.  Prices for wonderful fresh food stay low and you don't tip.  I saw several tables that not only left their plates and trays on the table, but left a mess of food, napkins, wrappers, and crumbs all over the table and floor.  Gross.

siamesecat2965

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22363 on: July 21, 2013, 07:40:34 PM »
If someone very short or otherwise unable asks me to get something not over-heavy/awkward or otherwise dangerous to get down ....and they ask *politely* I really don't mind putting my height to use. I would object to being barked at or ordered around. As it is, generally speaking an "Excuse me but could you reach the pudding mix for me dear" has never failed for the many folk who've asked me nicely.

I'm not that tall, but have helped out others who are shorter than I am. My issue is with short arms. I once had to ask a worker in target if he could please reach the yogurt that was waaaay back on the top shelf for me. But I said please and thank you, just like my mom taught me :)

And another time, at trader joes, I wanted to know if they had any more jam which was on the bottom shelf, but not visible. due to bad knees and back, I was unable to crouch down, and so i asked one of the guys working there if he could look for me. I felt terrible that he actually lay down on the floor (only way to see if any were on the very back of the shelf) but as I said to him, there was no way if i got down, i'd be able to get back up!

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22364 on: July 21, 2013, 07:44:50 PM »
I have no problem getting stuff for someone who needs help if they ask politely.  But if you ram me with your cart and/or bark an order at me?  'No, thank you.'
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