Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5367692 times)

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kherbert05

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22425 on: July 23, 2013, 08:27:01 PM »
<snip> Something about the way they design their stores puts my teeth on edge. I don't have panic attacks or anxiety issues - except when I set foot in their stores. Sis thought maybe they used peanut oil in their food prep areas and the smell was setting my radar off. But they don't . It is is the weirdest thing. I don't have the problem in any other brand of store - just theirs.

I've had something similar happen in three different stores and I think I finally solved the mystery...each store uses some type of high-end sonic alarm.  Every time I went in there, sometimes just in the door, I would start getting nervous, jittery, sweaty, nauseated, heart racing, short of breath...it was bizarre.
Maybe they do use something like that. I can tell when on of the older kids as that ring tone adults aren't suppose to hear - and I can "hear" bricks on electronics going bad. It's not really hearing but feeling it in my jaw and teeth.
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Poppea

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22426 on: July 23, 2013, 08:46:08 PM »
Went to a restaurant where you bus your own table.  Prices for wonderful fresh food stay low and you don't tip.  I saw several tables that not only left their plates and trays on the table, but left a mess of food, napkins, wrappers, and crumbs all over the table and floor.  Gross.

To be fair, it's sometimes hard to tell at counter service restaurants whether you're supposed to bus your own table or not.  I wouldn't be surprised if I've left stuff on the table in places I shouldn't have, just because I looked around and didn't see a trash can and made an assumption which may have been incorrect.

It's very obvious you're suppose to bus yourself, but even if you don't do it, the mess I saw today was very extreme and disgusting.  Never saw such a mess at fast food or full-service.

You may think that there is a requirement to bus a table but in many cases its just not true.  A few years ago there was a story on the news where a teenaged worker at McDonalds told a man that he should clear the mess at his table.  The man complained to corporate, McDonalds sent out a press release stating that clearing your own table is not required at the Golden Arches. 

I bus my own table to be polite, but unless there is a sign stating that it is a requirement, it is not.

There are signs which is why it was obvious you are suppose to bus your own (I should have included that they have signs in my OP.)  The signs explain it's to keep costs low; it's also stated on the menus.  You can't miss it; please believe me it's obvious.  But I'm not so hard nosed that I think leaving a tray or a few crumbs is horrible.  It's the fact they left *such* a gross mess that makes them SS.  It's so messy that I think it's SS even at a full-service restaurant with busboys and tipping.  The self-bussing rule just makes the mess worse (IMO).
In that case rude for ignoring the sign and pigs for making a mess like that in the first place.

blue2000

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22427 on: July 23, 2013, 09:08:29 PM »
SS aunt:

DH and I missed out, but this last week there was a family reunion of sorts at my grandparents' lake house.  My grandparents aren't in as great health as they used to be anymore (they're both in their 90s) so everyone tries to help out as much as possible, but grandma just can't let other people do the cooking/dishes/whatnot, so she putters around the (not all that huge) kitchen trying to help while other family members do the actual cooking.  In short: mealtimes are busy, crowded, and a bit crazy with eleven people all there at once:

Grandma and grandpa
My parents
My sister
My brother and SIL
My aunt, uncle, and their two boys (~8 and ~10)

SIL is allergic to peanuts.  My parents made sure grandma and grandpa knew this ahead of time, and even though they're not used to working around allergies (it just wasn't a thing for their generation), with my parents' help they were able to plan a menu which wouldn't involve peanuts or ingredients processed near peanuts.  This takes a bit of foresight and some specific brand-hunting, but it's doable.

Enter SS aunt: every time we see her she has a new "medical condition."  None of these conditions are ever diagnosed by a doctor, and they're usually reflective of whatever public health fear is going on at the time.  I'm not going to say that they're all imagined, but I will point out that the probability of the miracle-cure-of-the-month actually coinciding with her medical needs this often is probably pretty low.

Anyway, SS aunt waits until she gets to the lake house to announce that she no longer will consume gluten.  Except she "doesn't want to be a bother," so she doesn't want grandma to know.  She then does her own shopping trip (throwing off some other family plans in the process) and proceeds to stake out half the kitchen preparing her own not-at-all-related-to-the-menu meals every time the family is ready to eat.  Since it's not a large kitchen, this means that grandma and one or two other cooks are preparing food for 10 people in one half of the room and she's preparing food for just herself in the other half.

The kicker is, if she had only let someone know ahead of time, my parents and grandparents would have happily worked gluten-free options into the menu as well.  (There probably WERE plenty of gluten-free things, but she was doing all her own meals entirely from separate ingredients - it's not like she was willing to eat the meat but just substitute in another starch, for example.)  And in "not being a bother" and buying her own groceries, she made things much more difficult for my SIL, who no longer could assume that the kitchen was peanut-free.

My parents left over the weekend, but another of my cousins was coming up yesterday - and she's allergic to gluten too.  Except she's open about it, she called ahead of time to make sure it wouldn't be a problem, and Grandma is expecting to be making gluten free alternatives (for one) each meal.  Mom said she had a word with SS aunt before she left, suggesting perhaps she should actually TELL someone about her dietary needs, so Grandma would know to make *two* gluten-free portions each meal and would stop assuming SS aunt is hogging half the kitchen just to be SS.

I would label her an SS for hogging the kitchen, and not doing her shopping before she came, and a MAJOR you-know-what for ignoring the peanut-free rules. :o >:(

But I wouldn't get mad at her for not just eating the meat and substituting a starch. Most storebought hamburger patties and hot dogs are not gluten-free, and some other common condiments and spices for meat dishes aren't either. I know your grandmother is willing to cook for her, but since she is newly diagnosed (?) she may not trust other people to check the ingredients.


(this is a bit of a hot-button issue for me. I am starting to bring my own food to family dinners because some people cannot or will not make food I can eat - and then I have a mostly empty plate to stare at all evening while everyone else pigs out. It sucks. :( )
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TootsNYC

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22428 on: July 23, 2013, 09:12:23 PM »
Trying to decide if my friend Sarah is an SS.

Background:  Sarah lives on a five-acre farm.  She bought a sheepdog, not because she has sheep, but to help watch her two young sons (ten and eight).   Spot is an excellent sheepdog and is very good at shepherding the boys away from potential danger, such as the creek that runs through their property.    Another mother, Jane, recently brought her sons over to play and left for a while.   When she returned, she asked where the kids were.   Sarah said "Not sure, but I hear Spot barking, so they're not far."   Jane, appalled, said "YOU'RE not watching them?"   "No - Spot is.  She's very good at it.   The kids will be fine."    They WERE fine, but Jane gave Sarah heck and left, vowing never to let her kids play there again.    Sarah was alternately amused and indignant, saying that Jane was being ridiculous.

Thing is:   I'm kind of on Jane's side.   I'm sure Spot is amazing, but I wouldn't have been too happy if MY kids were roaming around a five-acre farm without an adult close by.   What do you think?

The kid is 8? And he's in the company of the two boys who live on the farm?

I'd be totally OK with it.

Because I sure wouldn't expect the grownup to shadow three 8yo's (or older, since one brother is 10) around a farm and it would be a huge shame for them to have to stay indoors or only in the immediate yard.

I know farms can be dangerous, but I think most kid have some sense.

Because if I were the mom on the farm, and you wanted your visiting child to be directly supervised by me, he's going to be sitting in the living room playing video games while my kids go running around outside. I don't have time or energy to follow them everywhere they go.

Slartibartfast

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22429 on: July 23, 2013, 09:27:57 PM »
I'd say "newly decided" rather than "newly diagnosed," given her history  :P but it's good to know that about gluten hiding in otherwise-safe-looking dishes.  I would still assert, though, that even if you have a restrictive dietary need and the host didn't know about it (whether it was your fault or not), it's still more polite to at least inquire what the rest of the group will be eating and to eat whatever parts of that you can be sure will fit with your diet.  (Not talking "mystery hot dogs" here, but things like "steamed fresh asparagus" and the like.)  If you then can't eat anything on the menu, you at least can say "Gee, X, Y, and Z all can have [forbidden ingredient] in them and it's really hard to tell if you're not used to avoiding it.  Thanks for offering, but I actually brought my own meal just in case."

BB-VA

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22430 on: July 23, 2013, 09:40:40 PM »
I grew up that way, minus the sheepdog. And we aren't talking about toddlers here, but boys 8+ years old, perfectly capable of walking to school alone or crossing the street to a friend's house; much more dangerous really, but socially acceptable.

Parking my POD right here.   I had MUCH more freedom as a child than kids these days (and more responsibility, too).

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« Last Edit: July 23, 2013, 09:46:58 PM by BB-VA »
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gramma dishes

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22431 on: July 23, 2013, 10:10:40 PM »
The amazing thing here is that we're talking about five acres!  Five! 

Five acres isn't going to have rampaging bulls or dangerous, large scale farming equipment zooming around to be avoided.  There's a creek running through the property, not a raging river.  It's probably less dangerous than your neighbor's swimming pool.

If you lived in the suburbs and you and all your neighbors had 1/2 acre lots, that would be your yard, the two yards on either side of you and the five yards behind you.  Good grief.  Even city kids a lot younger than eight play relatively unsupervised in that small of an area. 

andi

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22432 on: July 23, 2013, 10:20:09 PM »
<snip> Something about the way they design their stores puts my teeth on edge. I don't have panic attacks or anxiety issues - except when I set foot in their stores. Sis thought maybe they used peanut oil in their food prep areas and the smell was setting my radar off. But they don't . It is is the weirdest thing. I don't have the problem in any other brand of store - just theirs.

I've had something similar happen in three different stores and I think I finally solved the mystery...each store uses some type of high-end sonic alarm.  Every time I went in there, sometimes just in the door, I would start getting nervous, jittery, sweaty, nauseated, heart racing, short of breath...it was bizarre.

Interesting - I'll have to ask hubby if he knows anything about that.

Twik

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22433 on: July 23, 2013, 10:48:03 PM »
Sigh. I remember growing up when kids were shoved out the door in the morning to roam the neighbourhood until lunch, without our parents watching our every move.
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PastryGoddess

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22434 on: July 23, 2013, 11:13:10 PM »
Sigh. I remember growing up when kids were shoved out the door in the morning to roam the neighbourhood until lunch, without our parents watching our every move.
Me too and I grew up first in the inner city and then in the suburbs.

Miss Tickle

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22435 on: July 23, 2013, 11:20:15 PM »
"Another mother, Jane, recently brought her sons over to play and left for a while.   When she returned, she asked where the kids were."

This is the special snowflake, not Sarah. Anyone else remember, "Come home when it gets dark."?

...

The grocery across the street reopened last week so a friend and I checked it out. The entrance was kind of confusing, I guess, so met met an SS:-

You enter the store from the street and are faced with the entrance to the parking lot. To the right is a large display of stuff, to the near left you are faced with the down escalator, and a down escalator for carts. To the far left is a hall, and if you step into the hall you can see the up escalator. The problem was people couldn't see the "up" side, so they took their carts to the "down" side and hovered, hoping for miracles.

We, being adventurous and cartless, explored the nether regions of the hallway and discovered the "up" side. We could see the people with carts behind us eyeing us nervously, like we were the first baby seals to test the ocean, and when we didn't flee back they followed. SS leading the pack.

SS cut to the inside, and rushed past us to shove his cart into the cart escalator and then stood in the entrance of the people escalator until his cart was halfway up. We met up with him as he got to the gates, so we thought he'd just let us up, but he stood in the way, holding up the rest of the people that followed as well.

TeamBhakta

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22436 on: July 23, 2013, 11:34:06 PM »
Apparently this happened at Mom's church recently:

Woman (walks in with tennis racket + water bottle): Is there a preacher here ?
Pastor: Yes, I'm the pastor. What can I do for you ?
Woman: I need you to bless the tennis game I'm playing in today.
Pastor: I'm sorry, I'm afraid that isn't something we do here. The service is starting in a few minutes, though. Would you like to sit in for it ?
Woman: No, I don't have time for things like that! Can't you just do it anyway ? This is a really important game!
Pastor: I'm sorry, I can't.
Woman: Fine, I'll just keep driving around until I find a place that will do it! *stomps off*

Keep in mind this church is out in the boonies. Any tennis courts are a couple miles away, unless you climb over a fence into the local high school's tennis court. I think there's also one tennis court in the nearest park, but it's not high quality as far I know.
« Last Edit: July 23, 2013, 11:39:30 PM by TeamBhakta »

violetminnow

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22437 on: July 23, 2013, 11:38:45 PM »
Trying to decide if my friend Sarah is an SS.

Background:  Sarah lives on a five-acre farm.  She bought a sheepdog, not because she has sheep, but to help watch her two young sons (ten and eight).   Spot is an excellent sheepdog and is very good at shepherding the boys away from potential danger, such as the creek that runs through their property.    Another mother, Jane, recently brought her sons over to play and left for a while.   When she returned, she asked where the kids were.   Sarah said "Not sure, but I hear Spot barking, so they're not far."   Jane, appalled, said "YOU'RE not watching them?"   "No - Spot is.  She's very good at it.   The kids will be fine."    They WERE fine, but Jane gave Sarah heck and left, vowing never to let her kids play there again.    Sarah was alternately amused and indignant, saying that Jane was being ridiculous.

Thing is:   I'm kind of on Jane's side.   I'm sure Spot is amazing, but I wouldn't have been too happy if MY kids were roaming around a five-acre farm without an adult close by.   What do you think?

I honestly think if Jane is particular about how her kids are watched when she's not around she would do well to ask before leaving her kids. It doesn't sound like Sarah secretly left the kids alone, she had no problem telling Jane the kids were alone when she returned. If you drop off your kids without asking what they'll be up to, then get mad about what they got up to, you're  the Special Snowflake. I'm voting Jane to be the SS one.

MommyPenguin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22438 on: July 23, 2013, 11:52:59 PM »
Sigh. I remember growing up when kids were shoved out the door in the morning to roam the neighbourhood until lunch, without our parents watching our every move.
Me too and I grew up first in the inner city and then in the suburbs.

Yeah, and now if you so much as let your kid walk a few blocks by himself you have CPS threaten to take the kid away.  And this when crime is way down and the risk of kidnapping or being hit by a car is far less than the risk of obesity by being locked in your house all day.

Pen^2

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22439 on: July 24, 2013, 03:52:08 AM »
<snip> Something about the way they design their stores puts my teeth on edge. I don't have panic attacks or anxiety issues - except when I set foot in their stores. Sis thought maybe they used peanut oil in their food prep areas and the smell was setting my radar off. But they don't . It is is the weirdest thing. I don't have the problem in any other brand of store - just theirs.

I've had something similar happen in three different stores and I think I finally solved the mystery...each store uses some type of high-end sonic alarm.  Every time I went in there, sometimes just in the door, I would start getting nervous, jittery, sweaty, nauseated, heart racing, short of breath...it was bizarre.

Interesting - I'll have to ask hubby if he knows anything about that.

I hear the horrible, intense, high-pitched eeeeee in a lot of places. DH can't, but I can, and it makes my head ring and I start sweating as my heart races from the strong irritation. I didn't know this happened to people who can't hear it. My local library is unfortunately a big culprit here: I have to sit far away from the entrance where the alarm thing is, or I can't concentrate enough to even read a paragraph.

I was at a nursery (garden place, not baby place) once and their bug deterrent was a gizmo that emitted a similar noise. I couldn't look at half the plants because the sound was too strong. I don't know if it worked on insects, but it certainly worked on me. I asked the lady at the counter and she was unaware that the sound was audible. "Although, now that you mention it, a lot of kids complain about the noise, but we always thought they were making it up..."