Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 4389761 times)

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Thipu1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22515 on: July 27, 2013, 08:28:27 PM »
Y'know, some people really need a list when shopping....

Amen!  When we were working I used to do most of the food shopping.  I always had a list and stuck to it.  From time to time, Mr. Thipu would come along to help carry heavy or bulky items home.  I also wanted him to see what was available.  Perhaps he'd prefer Y crackers to the X crackers we usually bought. The only problem was that, if he came along, I'd have to bring an extra $20 to cover the exotic cheeses and things he'd pick up.

Now, he does most of the grocery shopping and always writes a list before he goes.     

PastryGoddess

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22516 on: July 27, 2013, 08:33:07 PM »
Y'know, some people really need a list when shopping....
My aunt used to do this on purpose.  She'd get a few things and then stand behind someone with a bunch of stuff.  Once she got to the belt, she would unload everything and then go off and do the rest of her shopping leaving one of the kids behind to keep her place.  She's dead now, so it doesn't happen anymore, but it got to the point where no one wanted to let her babysit their kids.

Why on earth would she do that though? Like what was the point?

I'd assume so she could shop without her kids bugging her the whole time, but without having to actually arrange for childcare.
Yes this and she thought this way it would save her time. In her mind, she was shopping faster because she didn't have to spend "all that time shopping and then waste my time standing in line"  The problem was that the kids would get up to the front of the line and have to wait for her to come back.  So she was holding up everyone else in line.

She was all sorts of special
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iridaceae

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22517 on: July 28, 2013, 05:20:01 AM »
In Arizona if you don't need a replacement driver's license for any reason you are required to get a replacement one after 12 years.

So I went to the DMV. There is a desk where you tell the clerks what you need and they give you the appropriate ticket and then you die a horrible slow death waiting.

There is one person in line-talking the the clerk. Then there is a woman five feet back yammering on her cell phone and about two feet over. Right next to a man leaning against the wall. So I politely said "excuse me ma'am are you in line?" She turned and said very loudly and sharply as if I were a mere servant "YES I am in line!" and glared at me.

Yeah no way to know,  lady.  Not from where you were standing.

JadeAngel

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22518 on: July 28, 2013, 08:27:07 AM »
Went to a local hot springs recently, they have a series of pools of varying temperatures scattered up the hill, which looks over the surrounding countryside (the view from the topmost pool is spectacular, but I digress)

One of the pools is designated as the 'silent pool' meaning no talking, no cellphones, no personal music devices etc, it's a place for silent contemplation and relaxation... but apparently this was lost on the two women who waded into the pool and proceeded to have a very loud conversation from opposite sides of the pool completely oblivious to the looks of disgust coming at them from every side. Presently a staff member walked by, not sure whether they happened by or someone complained, but they approached the women and politely advised them that this was the silent pool, and if they wished to continue their conversation they would need to move to one of the (many) other available pools in the area.

Immediately these women were up in arms, no-one told them this was a silent pool (despite three signs placed at intervals around the pool and one stationed at the entrance clearly stating the rules of the silent pool) how was it reasonable that they had to move, they were just talking, they weren't hurting anyone (although I think a glance around the pool told them clearly they were irritating more than a few of us) In the end they waded out of the pool and collected their things making loud passive aggressive comments about how people were 'soo unreasonable' and 'rude' and 'intolerant' and fine they were leaving see if they cared, they ought to complain to management and so on and so forth until they were finally, blessedly, out of earshot.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22519 on: July 28, 2013, 08:57:46 AM »
Theme parks are rife with the SS's.  Though I don't know that some of them are oblivious or actual snowflakes.  One woman in the line for the lazy river was very slowly walking through one part of the line, looking for a place to cut in to get closer to the front, or looking for friends to join, but the end of the line was a good few feet ahead of her so we eventually just passed her, getting tired of her holding us up.

And then we couldn't even go on because someone (I'm hoping it's a small child with no control of such things) had an accident in the river and they had to clean it up. :P After that I didn't want to go back in. 

But there always seem to be people who want to cut in.  In some cases I don't really mind if people are joining family members in line, especially if say it's a young kid who decides they do want to ride after all and can't ride without an adult or might be nervous to ride alone. As long as they do it politely (ie "Do you mind?" or "Excuse me, could you let my kid in front of you so he can join us?") I don't paint them as SS's.  It's the people who act like you're not even there and cut in line. 
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Momiitz

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22520 on: July 28, 2013, 09:08:38 AM »
We had some special snowflakes show up at my sister in law's wedding. My SIL had rented a church close to a college in town for her wedding and reception. At the same time as the wedding, the college was having a big basketball game nearby. 

At the church driveway entrance there was a big sign that said "Private Property! No Game Parking! Owners will be towed at owners expense."  You can't miss it. FYI - the church always puts up this sign on game days wether they have rented out the church or not.

My father in law and the grooms father were keeping an eye on the parking lot and greeting guests as they arrived.  They saw two cars pull up and park that were not guests of the wedding, they were dressed to go to the game. My FIL walked up to them and told them they could not park there, that the parking lot was private property.  He told the SS's they would have to move there cars or they would be towed.  I cannot remember exactly what they said to my father in law but they were rude to him with their answer.  They ignored his advice and walked away to go to the game without moving their cars. 

So my FIL called the towing company and they towed both cars. If the SS's had parked in the college venues parking lot it would have cost them $10. To get their cars out of the tow lot probably cost $120-$150 each car.

Twik

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22521 on: July 28, 2013, 09:49:13 AM »
I was approached by a SS at work today. This woman brought me a refrigerated spray can of whipped cream, minus the cap. She was very concerned because "I found this in the trash. Someone threw this out  :-[ I can't believe someone would do that. It must've been by mistake." Our store's trash cans are deep and have heavy lids; so she must've taken a lid off and dug through lots of garbage  :o My co-workers and I had to butter her up to get the spray can away from her, because it seemed very obvious she wanted us to produce a cap and let her put it back in the refrigerator case. "Oh, I'm sorry. We can't put it back out for sale. Health department rules, you know...The person who threw it out could've tampered with it. You wouldn't want someone to get sick from it, right ?....Thank you so much for understanding our policy. I'll throw that out for you." :P

So, she went digging through your trash to rescue discarded food items? And wanted you to return them to the shelves? Very odd.
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PeterM

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22522 on: July 28, 2013, 01:05:47 PM »
So, she went digging through your trash to rescue discarded food items? And wanted you to return them to the shelves? Very odd.

This apparently happens to libraries, too. I haven't seen it myself but I've read several accounts of libraries that have discarded or recycled books that clearly have no business remaining on the shelf, only to have irate patrons dig them out of the trash and demand they be returned to circulation. I'd imagine it's a combination of "Every book is sacred!" and "It's a waste of my tax dollars!", neither of which are actually true.

shhh its me

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22523 on: July 28, 2013, 02:33:27 PM »
Trying to decide if my friend Sarah is an SS.

Background:  Sarah lives on a five-acre farm.  She bought a sheepdog, not because she has sheep, but to help watch her two young sons (ten and eight).   Spot is an excellent sheepdog and is very good at shepherding the boys away from potential danger, such as the creek that runs through their property.    Another mother, Jane, recently brought her sons over to play and left for a while.   When she returned, she asked where the kids were.   Sarah said "Not sure, but I hear Spot barking, so they're not far."   Jane, appalled, said "YOU'RE not watching them?"   "No - Spot is.  She's very good at it.   The kids will be fine."    They WERE fine, but Jane gave Sarah heck and left, vowing never to let her kids play there again.    Sarah was alternately amused and indignant, saying that Jane was being ridiculous.

Thing is:   I'm kind of on Jane's side.   I'm sure Spot is amazing, but I wouldn't have been too happy if MY kids were roaming around a five-acre farm without an adult close by.   What do you think?

8 and 10 year olds with no developmental delays on my own property? Wouldn't even OCCUR to me to watch them. I wouldn't even bother with the dog, although it's a great compromise and a cute story.

This. My grandparents home was on a 10 acre farm and we were wandering around it without adult supervision by age 5. By 8 we were helping out at the big farm (250 acres) without supervision.
I think I'm on Jane's side two. Sarah's kids may be fine but kids have the dangers of THEIR own homes drilled into their heads not other families. I warned my kid about not crossing the street at a particular corner with bad visibility and where drivers frequently ignored the stop sign, as an example.   Saying "the dog is watching them, she's good at it"  would have pushed it over the edge.  Not thinking the kids needed watching I can understand , although I may not 100% agree with.  Thinking and implying I know they need supervision the dog can supervise would have astounded me.

Edited to add "The kids are playing outside with the dog" and " I don't know where the kids are but the dog is watching them" might mean the exact same thing to Sara , to me totally different.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2013, 03:04:01 PM by Merry Mrs Martin »

PastryGoddess

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22524 on: July 28, 2013, 04:35:04 PM »
I saw it as two different parenting styles and a lack of communication.  Both Jane and Sara have different ideas of what watching children mean, but neither one of them said anything to one another about their expectations or lack thereof.

I watch my cousins (11 and 14) every now and then and unless there is something specific that I need to know (homework, sickness, allergies, etc), my aunt just drops them off and says have fun.  It wouldn't occur to me to let her know how I planned on watching them.  It also wouldn't occur to her to tell me how to watch them either.  She trusts me to keep them safe and out of harms way.  I trust that she knows I'm not going to do anything crazy with them.
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Thipu1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22525 on: July 28, 2013, 04:50:40 PM »
So, she went digging through your trash to rescue discarded food items? And wanted you to return them to the shelves? Very odd.

This apparently happens to libraries, too. I haven't seen it myself but I've read several accounts of libraries that have discarded or recycled books that clearly have no business remaining on the shelf, only to have irate patrons dig them out of the trash and demand they be returned to circulation. I'd imagine it's a combination of "Every book is sacred!" and "It's a waste of my tax dollars!", neither of which are actually true.

I wouldn't necessarily call the people who feel the need to 'rescue' discarded books SS.  They're just misguided. They think of weeding as the destruction of information.   A bit of public education can go a long way to changing attitudes.

Every book is not sacred.  The information it contains may be of value but the physical object can be a hazard.

Libraries must weed from time to time if the collections aren't going to get completely out of control.  Books that are infested with mold or bugs and would cost more to repair than they're worth need to go.  Books that have been vandalized or loved to death need to go.  A biology textbook from 1964 may have some historic interest but it shouldn't be in general circulation. Getting rid of these things actually saves taxpayer money because every book costs a library money to shelve and maintain.     

Most libraries I know are quite circumspect about disposing of deaccessioned material.  Items that aren't in absolutely ghastly condition are often offered for sale to patrons at very low prices.  The really bad stuff is sometimes shredded or hauled away, literally in the dead of night.   

RegionMom

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22526 on: July 28, 2013, 05:51:02 PM »
And then there is Half-Price Book Store, which will buy most any book, but they do still have standards.

There is a story around of a box of disgusting books they tossed, absolutely nothing was  salvageable (water damaged, torn, horribly out-dated and not historical or fun, bug-eaten, etc...) and someone dug that nasty box out of a dumpster and tried to sell it to the store.

Since the person seemed "house-challenged" (urban-outdoorsman) the salesman gave him a few bucks anyway, and then they burned the box/sent it miles away/hacked away at it with a machete/destroyed the books!

Fear is temporary...Regret is forever.

Thipu1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22527 on: July 28, 2013, 07:50:15 PM »
And then there is Half-Price Book Store, which will buy most any book, but they do still have standards.

There is a story around of a box of disgusting books they tossed, absolutely nothing was  salvageable (water damaged, torn, horribly out-dated and not historical or fun, bug-eaten, etc...) and someone dug that nasty box out of a dumpster and tried to sell it to the store.

Since the person seemed "house-challenged" (urban-outdoorsman) the salesman gave him a few bucks anyway, and then they burned the box/sent it miles away/hacked away at it with a machete/destroyed the books!

This sort of thing happens all the time at re-sale book stores and libraries.  The family is cleaning out Great Aunt Larry's basement or attic.  They found these boxes and boxes of books that must be  worth a fortune because they're all SO OLD.

In many cases, it's almost impossible to tell the books from the cardboard boxes in which they arrived.  You'd need a Hazmat suit to go through these things.         

EMuir

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22528 on: July 28, 2013, 08:13:23 PM »
This weekend was made bearable because I knew I could post about the Special Snowflake Bride when I got home. 

My partner's sister, the bride, let's call her Marie, has always been egotistical and self-centered, but underneath it all has a good heart. Which is why she isn't Bridezilla, she didn't demand that things get done... but she just kind of assumed everyone else would do everything without being told of ANY details because, well, she was special and the day would go well because of that.

After originally being told the wedding wouldn't be for two years, then in September, suddenly three weeks ago announced she was getting married this weekend.  My partner and I managed to get the Friday off work, amazingly.  It was a six hour drive.

My partner told her sister Marie that if there was anything we could bring with us, just ask. Marie called the night before we left to ask us to bring enough breakfast food to feed 25 people each morning for the Saturday and Sunday. And some white sandals for her to wear in the ceremony.  So we got up earlier on the day we were driving to do the shopping.

The wedding rehearsal was supposed to be Friday at 7pm. We hear they are going to pick up the rings Friday in a city four hours away from them. The minister shows up at 7pm, no couple. (We were texting with people who were there, because since Marie has a reputation for being late, we were chilling somewhere else nearby until we know the rehearsal is really going to happen.) Eventually Marie and BF show up at 9pm, but the minister has left. So now the plan is rehearsal 11:30am Saturday, wedding at 1pm sharp.

We were at the rehearsal at 11:30, happy couple doesn't show up until 12 noon.  It is a ceremony in the groom's backyard, so quite casual... in fact, we were all asked to bring our own lawn chairs. But the rehearsal takes place.

The ceremony is short and sweet. Afterwards, there's a sheet cake.  But no plates or forks.  Someone finds a knife to cut the cake and a roll of paper towels.  Kind of a messy experience, but of course since nobody magically thought to bring that kind of thing, and the bride and groom were giving no directions, that's what happens.

The biggest special snowflake moment though was that the bride insisted the day would be gorgeous for the outside ceremony and later reception/dinner.  So of course they had no plan in case of rain. The reception was supposed to be at 4pm "sharp" (I heard Marie say this directly).  Of course the couple doesn't show up until 5pm, and we don't eat until 5:30... at which point it starts to rain.  The bride and groom attempt to insist it's ok, but finally the bride gives in (after we're all wet) and agrees to move everything into her house.

The only reason the event worked at all was because the bride's family was working tirelessly behind the scenes, off the cuff, with no direction, all day. I heard enough grumbling that I'm pretty sure that Marie will be on her own if she ever hosts another event.  But it's over!






snowdragon

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22529 on: July 28, 2013, 08:26:43 PM »
Two from my bike ride today.

  There is a lovely bike/walk/ski trail  behind my house. I ride there frequently and usually the folks on it are lovely. Tonight I ran into two SS in a half an hour ride. The first pair was the couple who would.not.share. the trail. The man in the pair had to riderightnexttohiscompanion. While the trail is wide enough for three bikers to fit comfortably- these two refused to keep to the right and came down the middle of the path,  two abreast. They forced one runner into the bush and tried to have me go around them. I stopped, got off my bike and stood on the right hand most lane. When they were forced to move over or hit me, the guy called me the word for a lady of the  evening that begins with "W".
 A little while later, I saw a guy on a trike riding along side his dog. The dog was on an extendable leash and when the dog wanted to chase people he would let the leash go to its fullest extent. The dog nipped at people and scared the tar out of a toddler - and the guy insisted that his mutt had the "right to be there -deal with him." the father of the scared toddler finally looked at him and said 'If that dog comes anywhere near my kids again, I *will* deal with both of you." and picked his kid up - took her bike and left this exchange was so loud and the area so quiet I could hear the entire exchange for about 1/4 mile or so....the guy with the dog, was left insisting his dog "has rights,too."
somehow, I think that dog is going to be in serious trouble one day with an owner who won't control it.