Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5300518 times)

10 Members and 9 Guests are viewing this topic.

Kimblee

  • I look good in white....
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6692
  • "Hugs don't go Boom." "They don't? Since when?"
    • My Blog
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22530 on: July 28, 2013, 09:47:15 PM »
I have a Darwin Awards Omnibus (who doesn't?) and one of the most unsettling ones was about a woman who was merrily spreading honey on her child's face so that she could take a wonderful photo of the bear licking the toddler.
This probably belongs in the "ya ... don't do that" thread, but the "honey on her child's face" reminded me of when I was young (tweenage) and I had a pet rat.  Peter Ratit weighed a pound; His body was a foot long and his tail was almost a foot long, so he was a big pet rat.

Someone told me that rats like peanut butter.  I stuck my finger in the peanut butter jar and then put my hand in Peter's large cage.  Peter grabbed my finger in his mouth and took off for his shoebox so he could consume the p'nut butter in privacy.  I know he didn't want to bite or eat my finger; He just wanted the p'nut butter.  Still, if I had resisted, those sharp teeth would have pierced my skin.  I let him take my finger into his shoebox and held still until he finished licking the p'nut butter off my finger.  He was normally a mellow guy, except when p'nut butter was involved.  I imagine a wild bear would be even more excited about honey and, even if s/he (the bear) did not intend to hurt the child, the process of taking the honey-covered object to a safe place to consume it would probably damage the child in some way, especially if s/he resisted.

What. An. Awesome. Name.

My little male rat loved peanut butter too. It was only after we lost him (to old age! this isn't one of those heartbreaking "I lost a pet to something that i thought was safe" stories. I have one of those about why you don't give canaries extra bird vitamin liquid tho. But Zolf(aka Zoloft) the rat was a hefty nine years old when he left us and for all i know he might've been older than that. He was fully grown when we got him. He died sleeping in my bra, a fate a friend of mine mentioned to be "admirable") that I found out peanut butter can cause choking in rats and mice, and so had to be diluted.

Zolf never had trouble though. he lapped it up off any available surface.

Mel the Redcap

  • Scheming Foreign Hussy!
  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 899
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22531 on: July 29, 2013, 05:58:50 AM »
My little male rat loved peanut butter too. It was only after we lost him (to old age! this isn't one of those heartbreaking "I lost a pet to something that i thought was safe" stories. I have one of those about why you don't give canaries extra bird vitamin liquid tho. But Zolf(aka Zoloft) the rat was a hefty nine years old when he left us and for all i know he might've been older than that. He was fully grown when we got him. He died sleeping in my bra, a fate a friend of mine mentioned to be "admirable") that I found out peanut butter can cause choking in rats and mice, and so had to be diluted.

Zolf never had trouble though. he lapped it up off any available surface.

Nine?! Seriously?! That is AWESOME, Kimblee! Most pet rats live to two, two and a half years old - I was very proud when several of mine made it past five. You were definitely looking after Zolf well! ;D
"Set aphasia to stun!"

Carotte

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1121
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22532 on: July 29, 2013, 07:13:06 AM »
NINE!!! Are you sure it wasn't an animagus?
Whow  :o

ladyknight1

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 7147
  • Operating the logic hammer since 1987.
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22533 on: July 29, 2013, 09:35:26 AM »
I have two stories to share.

Memorial service SS. We attended a lovely memorial service at a local camp for a long-time employee and volunteer who had passed away last month. It was very moving and heartfelt. However, a female attendee designated herself the photographer. This is a person who had never been to the camp (we have been volunteering there for over a decade) or met the deceased. She would jump in front of people, and we had at least 4 people in walkers or wheelchairs and many with canes. A friend of the family ended up asking her to stop. The camp has an official photographer, and he waited until long after the service to get a few pictures of the memorial display and the deposition of the ashes.

Movie theater SS. We went to see RED 2 in the theater yesterday afternoon, and by the time we got into the theater the credits were still playing, but most of the rows were pretty full. We found two spots with two seats. One, a woman put her leg on one of the seats to save it, so we went down to the next, asked if the people were saving the seats, and sat there. We should have sat in the individual seats on the other side of the theater.

People next to us had plastic grocery store bags of snacks, which they rustled throughout the movie. No attempt to be quiet about it. They both talked loudly throughout the movie, exclaiming things like "this is my favorite part" and "wow, she did ___ then ___ then ___". I ended up looking at them several times, to no avail. So rude!

We ended up stopping by guest services and getting passes for another movie because of the annoyance.

Coralreef

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2287
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22534 on: July 29, 2013, 09:37:09 AM »
My little male rat loved peanut butter too. It was only after we lost him (to old age! this isn't one of those heartbreaking "I lost a pet to something that i thought was safe" stories. I have one of those about why you don't give canaries extra bird vitamin liquid tho. But Zolf(aka Zoloft) the rat was a hefty nine years old when he left us and for all i know he might've been older than that. He was fully grown when we got him. He died sleeping in my bra, a fate a friend of mine mentioned to be "admirable") that I found out peanut butter can cause choking in rats and mice, and so had to be diluted.

Zolf never had trouble though. he lapped it up off any available surface.

Nine?! Seriously?! That is AWESOME, Kimblee! Most pet rats live to two, two and a half years old - I was very proud when several of mine made it past five. You were definitely looking after Zolf well! ;D

Pet ownership win!  That is all.

[/right

Winterlight

  • On the internet, no one can tell you're a dog- arf.
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 9757
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22535 on: July 29, 2013, 10:59:59 AM »
Trying to decide if my friend Sarah is an SS.

Background:  Sarah lives on a five-acre farm.  She bought a sheepdog, not because she has sheep, but to help watch her two young sons (ten and eight).   Spot is an excellent sheepdog and is very good at shepherding the boys away from potential danger, such as the creek that runs through their property.    Another mother, Jane, recently brought her sons over to play and left for a while.   When she returned, she asked where the kids were.   Sarah said "Not sure, but I hear Spot barking, so they're not far."   Jane, appalled, said "YOU'RE not watching them?"   "No - Spot is.  She's very good at it.   The kids will be fine."    They WERE fine, but Jane gave Sarah heck and left, vowing never to let her kids play there again.    Sarah was alternately amused and indignant, saying that Jane was being ridiculous.

Thing is:   I'm kind of on Jane's side.   I'm sure Spot is amazing, but I wouldn't have been too happy if MY kids were roaming around a five-acre farm without an adult close by.   What do you think?

I'm on Sarah's side. If Jane is uncomfortable with the kids being on their own, she now knows how Sarah does things. Scolding Sarah was rude.

And I speak as a kid who roamed all over the woods in our neighborhood at that age sans dog.
If wisdom’s ways you wisely seek,
Five things observe with care,
To whom you speak,
Of whom you speak,
And how, and when, and where.
Caroline Lake Ingalls

Winterlight

  • On the internet, no one can tell you're a dog- arf.
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 9757
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22536 on: July 29, 2013, 11:10:31 AM »

It's an anti-loitering device and companies put them up DELIBERATELY.   I read about it awhile ago.   There's even a website for it.
http://movingsoundtech.com/
So this is what we've come to. 


More specifically, it's an anti-YOUTH device. As people age, we lose our ability to hear high-pitched sounds. So these devices are designed to be audible only to the young.
These, I have a problem with. The way that the shopping center near us handles things? Not so much. (They play 30s/40s swing/big band music all day, interspersed with what could only be described as 'lounge singers of the 1970s'. Almost no one loiters, except for those three kids that love swing dancing, and no one minds them entertaining us).

You'd never have been able to get my brother or me out! At least we'd have been quiet.
If wisdom’s ways you wisely seek,
Five things observe with care,
To whom you speak,
Of whom you speak,
And how, and when, and where.
Caroline Lake Ingalls

Wulfie

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2613
  • I'm so pretty! Oh so pretty! - Morgan the Cat
    • Unique Weddings for Unique Couples
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22537 on: July 29, 2013, 11:48:37 AM »
Saw one at a restaurant yesterday. There were 3 kids playing in the video game area at a local restaurant. This area has 1 video game and 2 claw machines. Not a lot to keep kids occupied for a long time so when they had been there for a while with no adult in view, the hostess went to check on them. Turns out that their parents dropped them off to wait there while they went to pick up people at the airport about 15 minutes away!  The hostess wanted to call CPS but unfortunately, they found that it was legal for the oldest kid to ‘babysit” his siblings outside of their home. The parents had the kids order a meal so they were not loitering.   The manager was NOT happy and asked for the hostess to call him when the parents show up to pay for the meals.

SiotehCat

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3697
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22538 on: July 29, 2013, 11:53:14 AM »
Saw one at a restaurant yesterday. There were 3 kids playing in the video game area at a local restaurant. This area has 1 video game and 2 claw machines. Not a lot to keep kids occupied for a long time so when they had been there for a while with no adult in view, the hostess went to check on them. Turns out that their parents dropped them off to wait there while they went to pick up people at the airport about 15 minutes away!  The hostess wanted to call CPS but unfortunately, they found that it was legal for the oldest kid to ‘babysit” his siblings outside of their home. The parents had the kids order a meal so they were not loitering.   The manager was NOT happy and asked for the hostess to call him when the parents show up to pay for the meals.

How old were these kids?

I'm unsure what makes these parents SS. Their oldest was old enough to babysit. The kids did order food. It dust sound like the kids were disturbing anyone, so what makes them different from any other customers?

Wulfie

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2613
  • I'm so pretty! Oh so pretty! - Morgan the Cat
    • Unique Weddings for Unique Couples
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22539 on: July 29, 2013, 12:04:18 PM »
How old were these kids?

I'm unsure what makes these parents SS. Their oldest was old enough to babysit. The kids did order food. It dust sound like the kids were disturbing anyone, so what makes them different from any other customers?

I am not sure of the ages but I think the oldest was maybe 12 or 13 and the youngest was a toddler. The parents are a SS in my book because they dropped off the kids and while the oldest may have been legally old enough to babysit, it was obvious that they expected the resturant to babysit the kids in reality.  They were little monsters and WERE disturbing everyone. The kids also kept running into the bar for more change which is illegal in my state.

VorFemme

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 12795
  • Strolls with scissors! Too tired to run today!
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22540 on: July 29, 2013, 12:04:43 PM »
Saw one at a restaurant yesterday. There were 3 kids playing in the video game area at a local restaurant. This area has 1 video game and 2 claw machines. Not a lot to keep kids occupied for a long time so when they had been there for a while with no adult in view, the hostess went to check on them. Turns out that their parents dropped them off to wait there while they went to pick up people at the airport about 15 minutes away!  The hostess wanted to call CPS but unfortunately, they found that it was legal for the oldest kid to ‘babysit” his siblings outside of their home. The parents had the kids order a meal so they were not loitering.   The manager was NOT happy and asked for the hostess to call him when the parents show up to pay for the meals.

How old were these kids?

I'm unsure what makes these parents SS. Their oldest was old enough to babysit. The kids did order food. It dust sound like the kids were disturbing anyone, so what makes them different from any other customers?

It sounds like the kids may have ordered meals - but they were going to have to wait until the parents got back to PAY for the meals.
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

2littlemonkeys

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3571
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22541 on: July 29, 2013, 12:10:19 PM »
I saw this one in my MIL's Good Housekeeping magazine. 

http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/family/etiquette/saving-seats-public-pool

Basically, someone went to her local pool, put her stuff on a chair, LEFT to run errands and was angry to find her "spot" gone when she got back 2 hours later.  There was a big blowup over the whole thing (her own admission).  And she wanted to know who was right in "The Case of The Pool Chair."

 :o

Yarnspinner

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3906
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22542 on: July 29, 2013, 12:27:23 PM »
So, she went digging through your trash to rescue discarded food items? And wanted you to return them to the shelves? Very odd.

This apparently happens to libraries, too. I haven't seen it myself but I've read several accounts of libraries that have discarded or recycled books that clearly have no business remaining on the shelf, only to have irate patrons dig them out of the trash and demand they be returned to circulation. I'd imagine it's a combination of "Every book is sacred!" and "It's a waste of my tax dollars!", neither of which are actually true.

I wouldn't necessarily call the people who feel the need to 'rescue' discarded books SS.  They're just misguided. They think of weeding as the destruction of information.   A bit of public education can go a long way to changing attitudes.

Every book is not sacred.  The information it contains may be of value but the physical object can be a hazard.

Libraries must weed from time to time if the collections aren't going to get completely out of control.  Books that are infested with mold or bugs and would cost more to repair than they're worth need to go.  Books that have been vandalized or loved to death need to go.  A biology textbook from 1964 may have some historic interest but it shouldn't be in general circulation. Getting rid of these things actually saves taxpayer money because every book costs a library money to shelve and maintain.     

Most libraries I know are quite circumspect about disposing of deaccessioned material.  Items that aren't in absolutely ghastly condition are often offered for sale to patrons at very low prices.  The really bad stuff is sometimes shredded or hauled away, literally in the dead of night.   


As the person who does most of the weeding of our ancient fiction collection, I am both sympathetic to the patrons who are horrified we toss books and to the person who is doing the tossing.

I compromised with my superiors that I would definitely toss books that were on their last legs if they would allow me to keep (or replace) books that I felt we had no business tossing.  A lot of our books are like the ones in the far flung future scenes of the 1960 version of The Time Machine.  You look at them and they fall apart.

And this is why we are in the midst of getting in new copies of Jeeves, Henry James and why we still have all of Sarah Orne Jewett. 

So far.

Twik

  • A Pillar of the Forum
  • *****
  • Posts: 28388
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22543 on: July 29, 2013, 12:39:56 PM »
I saw this one in my MIL's Good Housekeeping magazine. 

http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/family/etiquette/saving-seats-public-pool

Basically, someone went to her local pool, put her stuff on a chair, LEFT to run errands and was angry to find her "spot" gone when she got back 2 hours later.  There was a big blowup over the whole thing (her own admission).  And she wanted to know who was right in "The Case of The Pool Chair."

 :o

I have to echo this. TWO HOURS later? And she was so upset that she's writing an advice columnist?

I suspect she's the sort of person who would also promptly claim a good chair if its occupant got up to use the washroom. Because, really, all good chairs are belong to her.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

Barney girl

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 328
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #22544 on: July 29, 2013, 12:41:25 PM »
My mother was a teacher at my secondary school and also ran the school library. As I was a library prefect and have always loved books I used to give her a hand in the school holidays even when I'd left for university. Which was how I came to discover that one of the books she had disposed of, because it was hardly read, was by an author I loved. (Violet Needham)
A few years later I enquired in a local second hand book shop if they ever got her books in and was told they were highly collectable.
Years later I got into collecting some children's authors' books myself and I think I paid about £25 for a copy of that book. I think at the time Mum disposed of it the concept of collecting children's books was it in its infancy (no pun intended), so she'd have given it to me or sold it for a nominal figure if she'd known I'd wanted it as I wasn't wanting to collect as such, just loved the story.