Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5642602 times)

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snowdragon

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23115 on: August 26, 2013, 08:34:15 PM »
Heck, even in the Dark Ages, we started the year with school supplies.  I don't remember the teacher sending home a list; certainly it would have been a lot shorter (I'm pretty sure no one was expected to bring boxes of tissues, and hand sanitizer didn't exist.)  But we were expected to have pencils, notebook, eraser, crayons, etc. 

Come to think of it, there must of been some kind of list.  In first grade, I was supposed to have thick pencils for some reason.  The teacher kept telling me to use the fat pencils; my mother kept refusing to buy fat pencils because we had lots of regular pencils.  Why did they keep telling me instead of each other?   ???

I certainly understand getting frustrated with the sheer amount of stuff parents have to buy.  School supplies for two kids ran me almost $200, counting sturdy backpacks.  I had to buy the usual notebooks, paper, giant packs of pencils and pens, but I also had to buy plastic gallon bags, tissue, paper plates, paper cups, hand sanitizer, and dry erase markers for the classroom whiteboard. The amount of stuff that parents are expected to provide for classroom wide use is getting ridiculous.

 Agreed. But alternative is the teachers spend thousands to buy all this for all the  kids in their classes, that does not seem reasonable either. And I think there should be better ways to handle it than tax increases.  There are so many grants and programs ( I spent 5 years researching these for a friend ) that schools could use it's not funny.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2013, 08:46:08 PM by snowdragon »

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23116 on: August 26, 2013, 08:38:02 PM »
Heck, even in the Dark Ages, we started the year with school supplies.  I don't remember the teacher sending home a list; certainly it would have been a lot shorter (I'm pretty sure no one was expected to bring boxes of tissues, and hand sanitizer didn't exist.)  But we were expected to have pencils, notebook, eraser, crayons, etc. 

Come to think of it, there must of been some kind of list.  In first grade, I was supposed to have thick pencils for some reason.  The teacher kept telling me to use the fat pencils; my mother kept refusing to buy fat pencils because we had lots of regular pencils.  Why did they keep telling me instead of each other?   ???

I certainly understand getting frustrated with the sheer amount of stuff parents have to buy.  School supplies for two kids ran me almost $200, counting sturdy backpacks.  I had to buy the usual notebooks, paper, giant packs of pencils and pens, but I also had to buy plastic gallon bags, tissue, paper plates, paper cups, hand sanitizer, and dry erase markers for the classroom whiteboard. The amount of stuff that parents are expected to provide for classroom wide use is getting ridiculous.

 Agreed. But alternative is the teachers spend thousands to buy all this for all the  kids in the

I agree, it doesn't really bother me because I've heard a lot of times due to budget cuts, if it's not the parents supplying it, it's the teacher who is producing this stuff from their own pocket money.
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kherbert05

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23117 on: August 26, 2013, 08:57:38 PM »
My DH and I visit the movie theater quite a bit and we have noticed it is more likely for adults to leave a mess than kids where we are. There is no excuse to leave your garbage everywhere! Especially items brought from outside that weren't caught by the ticket taker.

Flurry alert:
The coffee stand I patronize has a drive through window and a counter inside. A boy and his mother went to the drive through window and the boy (11-14 years old) shot the drive through window with a bb gun and shattered it. The mother calmly drove away, but the incident was recorded on their surveillance system.

I wonder if the county attorney could construe that to be a drive-by shooting and level charges at both the boy and his mother.
I would  hope so a BB gun is a GUN not a toy. He shot at people, she allowed it and drove off they should both be arrested and charged with the most severe charges possible.
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

andi

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23118 on: August 26, 2013, 09:07:49 PM »
A number of churches that I'm familiar with (I know of at least 3) have been collecting loaded backpacks for kids in poorer school districts.  You pick up a backpack from the church (not sure if you buy it from them or if they pay for them out of church funds) and then you load it up with school supplies from a list, and return it to the church.  They deliver hundreds of backpacks to various districts that need them.  So presumably those districts don't provide the supplies themselves and require the students to get them, but not all the students can afford to.

What I don't like is when parents are expected to foot the bill for the school supplies, but the supplies are then tossed into a communal pot and then the kids all share everything.  The crayons seem to get damaged a lot faster when they're "everybody's" property instead of one kid taking care of them.  And the so-carefully chosen favorite color of schoolbox or erasers gets lost and the girl ends up with
a black schoolbox instead of the purple one she chose.

Our church does the back pack /supply drive every year.   We always pick up a couple since Boo's supplies come with his tuition (private school) and I like shopping for supplies. 

I remember shopping for basic supplies in grade school (I graduated over 20 years ago and this was outside Chicago). Stuff lime markers, glue, tissues.  Middle school and high school alwya had big lists because every teacher  wanted you to have a different  organization set up. My folks had some lean years at that time and I had to reuse 3 ring binders. Urgh - that stunk

shhh its me

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23119 on: August 26, 2013, 09:16:19 PM »
Heck, even in the Dark Ages, we started the year with school supplies.  I don't remember the teacher sending home a list; certainly it would have been a lot shorter (I'm pretty sure no one was expected to bring boxes of tissues, and hand sanitizer didn't exist.)  But we were expected to have pencils, notebook, eraser, crayons, etc. 

Come to think of it, there must of been some kind of list.  In first grade, I was supposed to have thick pencils for some reason.  The teacher kept telling me to use the fat pencils; my mother kept refusing to buy fat pencils because we had lots of regular pencils.  Why did they keep telling me instead of each other?   ???

I certainly understand getting frustrated with the sheer amount of stuff parents have to buy.  School supplies for two kids ran me almost $200, counting sturdy backpacks.  I had to buy the usual notebooks, paper, giant packs of pencils and pens, but I also had to buy plastic gallon bags, tissue, paper plates, paper cups, hand sanitizer, and dry erase markers for the classroom whiteboard. The amount of stuff that parents are expected to provide for classroom wide use is getting ridiculous. 


But I certainly don't condone the way the dad behaved

One of the things that got me was hand sanitizer and hand soap , it seemed repetitive(they did have a sink in the classroom)  dry erase makers would have made me batty ,is there something I don;t know about black boards?   I respect teachers several people in my family are teachers but I remember 1st grade no teachers aid , no student teachers , no twice daily parent volunteers, no wet wipes ect... I don't see that my son came out of 1st grade with an experience that was better by 500 man-hours and $3000 dollars in supplies more expensive. I'm not complaining just musing about all the 'improvements " and how much they actually enriched education.

dawnfire

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23120 on: August 26, 2013, 09:20:11 PM »

I remember one year when our daughter's list included playing cards and dice.  I joked that the teacher must be planning to teach them how to gamble.

cards and dice are great to teach arithmetic. pull 2 cards and do whatever function you like add, subtract,multiply or which is bigger)

PS :we taught our eldest addition by teaching him blackjack. :)

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23121 on: August 26, 2013, 09:23:48 PM »
Just an interesting note about popcorn: popcorn in live theaters in Australia doesn't include butter syrup. The butter flavor is a kind of powder with salt that's added to the popcorn somehow. I only have greasy popcorn at home.

There's one theatre DH and I can go to that's licensed. It's so nice (shows old movies a lot) that we really wish we lived closer or had a car. But we do clean up afterwards as wel like going there so much. :)

HoneyBee42

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23122 on: August 26, 2013, 09:28:17 PM »
Jerry Seinfeld had a rant about why he felt justified leaving his trash behind in the theater...he paid $7.50 (it's an old routine :-) ) for his ticket, the theater was making enough money, let them clean it up.

Except of course he wasn't hurting the theater owner one tiny bit, just adding one more little bit of aggravation to the lives of the minimum wage employees who have to clean up after his lazy, entitled millionaire butt.

If I drop the stuff, by mistake, then yeah, that is what the employees are paid for, though I feel pretty crummy that I've made their jobs harder. If I throw the stuff on the floor, or even LEAVE it there intentionally, I'm jist being a jerk.

Rob

I don't see how leaving an empty popcorn bag on the floor of a theatre is making someone's job harder.  Their job is to clean up.  I could see how stepping on popcorn and grinding it into the carpet, or spilling soda, or leaving it wedged in your seat, could be an issue.  In fact, if everyone took their trash with them and was perfectly clean, there would be people losing their jobs because there would be nothing to clean up.

Retail worker here. Actually, no. We wouldn't.

If you didn't leave trash around, we would be able to do other, more pleasant things. We would have more money - the company wouldn't spend half as much money on cleaning supplies or damaged stock, resulting in higher raises and bonuses (I think we lost close to a million dollars in shoplifting/customer damage last year in our store alone. And that comes out of OUR bonus, not the bosses). Since we would be doing more technical things, we would have more training and have a much better-looking resume if we wanted to go elsewhere.

And most important, I would never again reach into the back of a shelf and put my hand in someone's half-chewed leftover lunch. :( I'd be really happy with that!

Lucky--I once worked at Kmart where we'd find things like used disposable diapers stuffed behind some of the package socks.  Reach in too hastily, and ...  *erk*

School supplies--I went to school in the early 70s and never had supplies provided by my school, but they did very helpfully include the supply list for the next year with the final report card (the lists were also devoid of the stuff like "bag of wrapped hard candies" and "ziploc bags" [size specified by gender of child], and your supplies were *yours*).  I liked that ever so much better than the way it worked in the public schools back in Syracuse (where I used to live)--they wouldn't hand out the list until the first day of class and then there'd be a mad frenzy because day 1 was a Thursday and you needed to have everything by Friday.  Seriously, you can't--especially for lower grade--come up with x #of 1-subject notebooks, pencils, pens, erasers, and the general "basics"?? The excuse was that each teacher might have a different list of desired supplies (why they couldn't already know where the children would be and have "you'll be in 'Ms Jones' class, here's the next grade supply list" but I guess that'd make too much sense).

 Here, it's more like a compromise, there's registration some time before classes start (usually about 2.5 weeks, but this year it's closer to a month due to renovations in one of the buildings in the district that didn't get finished on time) and the lists are given then.  There's also a "stuff the bus" program (I think it's through United Way) where there's bins where people donate supplies, and then they're gathered into packs (my daughter went to get some volunteer hours sorting through the donations so that the backpacks would be ready) and anyone who needs assistance lets the school know and the packs are given out to those who need them.  Middle son is in high school and I did some minimal ink pens, mechanical pencils (his preference), looseleaf paper and folders, and then after the first day he had a few things he still needed for specific classes, but it wasn't over $20 (and that was because one class required a flash drive otherwise it'd be less than $10).



lady_disdain

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23123 on: August 26, 2013, 09:40:24 PM »

 *insert small vent*  I used to sometimes think the teacher went and looked at the sale prices and specifically and exactly described only items that were still full price the first weeks of school.   100 page spiral notebooks are $1.68-$2.68 , 70 page are 9-19 cents I've been buying school supplies for 14 years the 70 page ones are always almost free the 100 page are always full price. When you ask for 6 in different colors that's a difference of 6-12 dollars.  24 crayons 10 cents the 12 you asked for 2.49 , again every year same price ratio and so it went for all 20 or so items.   The first year I followed the list exactly I don't know why you asked for 12 crayons maybe 24 is just too many choices for 6 year olds maybe they kids with 24 crayons are mean to the kids with 12 I assumed you had a reason to specifically request the most expensive option. That's not to mention the 10 red , green and black pens of which I still have 9 red and 9 green (years after the first time red and green implements were requested) and he never once filled the entire 70 page notebook when you insisted on 100 pages.  Teachers please take the extra moments to say "6 colors suggested/exactly 6 colors must include green and yellow" or "crayons minimum 12 colors/exactly 12 colors" or suggest your school adds it to the downloadable supply lists.   

My guess is that it is the other way - the stores know what is on the school supply lists and discount everything else instead. They can still advertise away with low, low prices and know that most parents will be buying the other stuff. They may even have increased certain prices a little.

shhh its me

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23124 on: August 26, 2013, 09:51:24 PM »

 *insert small vent*  I used to sometimes think the teacher went and looked at the sale prices and specifically and exactly described only items that were still full price the first weeks of school.   100 page spiral notebooks are $1.68-$2.68 , 70 page are 9-19 cents I've been buying school supplies for 14 years the 70 page ones are always almost free the 100 page are always full price. When you ask for 6 in different colors that's a difference of 6-12 dollars.  24 crayons 10 cents the 12 you asked for 2.49 , again every year same price ratio and so it went for all 20 or so items.   The first year I followed the list exactly I don't know why you asked for 12 crayons maybe 24 is just too many choices for 6 year olds maybe they kids with 24 crayons are mean to the kids with 12 I assumed you had a reason to specifically request the most expensive option. That's not to mention the 10 red , green and black pens of which I still have 9 red and 9 green (years after the first time red and green implements were requested) and he never once filled the entire 70 page notebook when you insisted on 100 pages.  Teachers please take the extra moments to say "6 colors suggested/exactly 6 colors must include green and yellow" or "crayons minimum 12 colors/exactly 12 colors" or suggest your school adds it to the downloadable supply lists.   

My guess is that it is the other way - the stores know what is on the school supply lists and discount everything else instead. They can still advertise away with low, low prices and know that most parents will be buying the other stuff. They may even have increased certain prices a little.

I would have guessed this is not for the fact its the same supplies that are lost leader each year and they were not virtually never on a supply list.   

ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23125 on: August 26, 2013, 10:39:49 PM »
In the mid-1970s we were requested to bring in tissues, fat pencils and crayons and paper.

I don't mind bringing school supplies in, in fact I tell teachers to email me when they run out of something. I know that is a hard and often thankless job.

What irks me are the people in luxury cars with the latest fancy accessories that won't buy their children pencils and paper so they can go to public schools. Every class, every grade since my son started school in 2003, we have had at least one parent.

ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23126 on: August 26, 2013, 10:55:02 PM »
Also, none of the schools my son has attended, he is in 10th grade, have had black boards. They all have white boards in every class.

There is one building at my university that still has black boards.

Elfmama

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23127 on: August 26, 2013, 11:25:07 PM »

I remember one year when our daughter's list included playing cards and dice.  I joked that the teacher must be planning to teach them how to gamble.

cards and dice are great to teach arithmetic. pull 2 cards and do whatever function you like add, subtract,multiply or which is bigger)

PS :we taught our eldest addition by teaching him blackjack. :)
I taught Grandson#1 addition/subtraction with dominoes.  By the time he graduated from kindergarten, I stopped telling him which ones would make a score, because he was beating me!
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Xandraea

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23128 on: August 27, 2013, 12:02:16 AM »
A number of churches that I'm familiar with (I know of at least 3) have been collecting loaded backpacks for kids in poorer school districts.  You pick up a backpack from the church (not sure if you buy it from them or if they pay for them out of church funds) and then you load it up with school supplies from a list, and return it to the church.  They deliver hundreds of backpacks to various districts that need them.  So presumably those districts don't provide the supplies themselves and require the students to get them, but not all the students can afford to.

What I don't like is when parents are expected to foot the bill for the school supplies, but the supplies are then tossed into a communal pot and then the kids all share everything.  The crayons seem to get damaged a lot faster when they're "everybody's" property instead of one kid taking care of them.  And the so-carefully chosen favorite color of schoolbox or erasers gets lost and the girl ends up with a black schoolbox instead of the purple one she chose.

  That drives me wild.

Me too!! AFTER my child's markers had been dumped into the communal bin, she was told she could pull hers back out again (days later), but by then it would have been such a treasure hunt she didn't bother. I was irritated because I spent more to get her the better quality supplies and they'd been mixed in with all the cheaper brand, for the other kids to use and abuse.  I also disliked being instructed by the teacher to buy specific items, and label them with my child's name, and then the items were not used, but we couldn't return them to the store because her name was on them.  That was the same year we were to buy two three-inch binders, one royal blue, one white.  I looked all over creation for the right color, only to hear classmates had pink and purple and green and teachers didn't care. ARGH!

norrina

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23129 on: August 27, 2013, 01:12:59 AM »
Perhaps I'm a special snowflake, because when we did back-to-school shopping for DSS this year, we bought what we could find and could afford, and the exact specified parameters went by the wayside. 3 packs of notebook paper, 100 count became 3 packs of notebook paper, 150 count. they would have been 2 packs under the theory that 300 sheets of paper is 300 sheets of paper except that the packs were going 3 different places. 3 24-packs of sharpened pencils became 3 30-packs of unsharpened pencils that we opened and sharpened at home. The response to 2 highlighters was to send the kid digging through the big bag of them that I had at home for 2 that seemed new. And his 1" binders may have been 1 1/2" inch, because they were also whatever we had at home.

I'm noticing that the year before DSS' has been instructed to bring in one package of Brand X dry erase markers. Presumably the brand is specified to avoid getting inferior products. No explanation is given as to what constitutes a "package" however. I can buy one large marker, 2 small markers, 3 clickable markers, 4 large markers (for the princely sum of $5.99, and this is the package most commonly sold in the stores; we have nearly 200 students per grade level, does the school really need 800 dry erase markers?!?)... I also note that a 12 pack is available for a much lower per-marker price than any of the smaller packages, and I would imagine the school could get some sort of discount, not to mention the tax exemption. I would much rather just donate my 1/3 to the school and let them deal with the Walmart tax-free-weekend crowds!