Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 4404369 times)

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Elfmama

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23130 on: August 26, 2013, 11:25:07 PM »

I remember one year when our daughter's list included playing cards and dice.  I joked that the teacher must be planning to teach them how to gamble.

cards and dice are great to teach arithmetic. pull 2 cards and do whatever function you like add, subtract,multiply or which is bigger)

PS :we taught our eldest addition by teaching him blackjack. :)
I taught Grandson#1 addition/subtraction with dominoes.  By the time he graduated from kindergarten, I stopped telling him which ones would make a score, because he was beating me!
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Xandraea

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23131 on: August 27, 2013, 12:02:16 AM »
A number of churches that I'm familiar with (I know of at least 3) have been collecting loaded backpacks for kids in poorer school districts.  You pick up a backpack from the church (not sure if you buy it from them or if they pay for them out of church funds) and then you load it up with school supplies from a list, and return it to the church.  They deliver hundreds of backpacks to various districts that need them.  So presumably those districts don't provide the supplies themselves and require the students to get them, but not all the students can afford to.

What I don't like is when parents are expected to foot the bill for the school supplies, but the supplies are then tossed into a communal pot and then the kids all share everything.  The crayons seem to get damaged a lot faster when they're "everybody's" property instead of one kid taking care of them.  And the so-carefully chosen favorite color of schoolbox or erasers gets lost and the girl ends up with a black schoolbox instead of the purple one she chose.

  That drives me wild.

Me too!! AFTER my child's markers had been dumped into the communal bin, she was told she could pull hers back out again (days later), but by then it would have been such a treasure hunt she didn't bother. I was irritated because I spent more to get her the better quality supplies and they'd been mixed in with all the cheaper brand, for the other kids to use and abuse.  I also disliked being instructed by the teacher to buy specific items, and label them with my child's name, and then the items were not used, but we couldn't return them to the store because her name was on them.  That was the same year we were to buy two three-inch binders, one royal blue, one white.  I looked all over creation for the right color, only to hear classmates had pink and purple and green and teachers didn't care. ARGH!

norrina

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23132 on: August 27, 2013, 01:12:59 AM »
Perhaps I'm a special snowflake, because when we did back-to-school shopping for DSS this year, we bought what we could find and could afford, and the exact specified parameters went by the wayside. 3 packs of notebook paper, 100 count became 3 packs of notebook paper, 150 count. they would have been 2 packs under the theory that 300 sheets of paper is 300 sheets of paper except that the packs were going 3 different places. 3 24-packs of sharpened pencils became 3 30-packs of unsharpened pencils that we opened and sharpened at home. The response to 2 highlighters was to send the kid digging through the big bag of them that I had at home for 2 that seemed new. And his 1" binders may have been 1 1/2" inch, because they were also whatever we had at home.

I'm noticing that the year before DSS' has been instructed to bring in one package of Brand X dry erase markers. Presumably the brand is specified to avoid getting inferior products. No explanation is given as to what constitutes a "package" however. I can buy one large marker, 2 small markers, 3 clickable markers, 4 large markers (for the princely sum of $5.99, and this is the package most commonly sold in the stores; we have nearly 200 students per grade level, does the school really need 800 dry erase markers?!?)... I also note that a 12 pack is available for a much lower per-marker price than any of the smaller packages, and I would imagine the school could get some sort of discount, not to mention the tax exemption. I would much rather just donate my 1/3 to the school and let them deal with the Walmart tax-free-weekend crowds!



hjaye

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23133 on: August 27, 2013, 02:42:47 AM »
Heck, even in the Dark Ages, we started the year with school supplies.  I don't remember the teacher sending home a list; certainly it would have been a lot shorter (I'm pretty sure no one was expected to bring boxes of tissues, and hand sanitizer didn't exist.)  But we were expected to have pencils, notebook, eraser, crayons, etc. 

Come to think of it, there must of been some kind of list.  In first grade, I was supposed to have thick pencils for some reason.  The teacher kept telling me to use the fat pencils; my mother kept refusing to buy fat pencils because we had lots of regular pencils.  Why did they keep telling me instead of each other?   ???

I certainly understand getting frustrated with the sheer amount of stuff parents have to buy.  School supplies for two kids ran me almost $200, counting sturdy backpacks.  I had to buy the usual notebooks, paper, giant packs of pencils and pens, but I also had to buy plastic gallon bags, tissue, paper plates, paper cups, hand sanitizer, and dry erase markers for the classroom whiteboard. The amount of stuff that parents are expected to provide for classroom wide use is getting ridiculous.

 Agreed. But alternative is the teachers spend thousands to buy all this for all the  kids in their classes, that does not seem reasonable either. And I think there should be better ways to handle it than tax increases.  There are so many grants and programs ( I spent 5 years researching these for a friend ) that schools could use it's not funny.

unfortunately, the money for the grants and the programs does not just appear out of thin air.  If it's a federal program, then my federal taxes are what's paying for these programs, if it's a state program then it's my state taxes, or property taxes.  The fact is, if it's coming from the government, then we are paying for it.

blue2000

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23134 on: August 27, 2013, 03:36:21 AM »

And most important, I would never again reach into the back of a shelf and put my hand in someone's half-chewed leftover lunch. :( I'd be really happy with that!

Lucky--I once worked at Kmart where we'd find things like used disposable diapers stuffed behind some of the package socks.  Reach in too hastily, and ...  *erk*


I've done that. *Erk* indeed! ??? :P But only once, thank deity. The lunch thing happens a lot.

What kills me is that it is deliberate. We have trash cans and diaper changing facilities. And yet people very carefully hide their trash behind the goods on the shelves.
You are only young once. After that you have to think up some other excuse.

StarFaerie

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23135 on: August 27, 2013, 04:55:15 AM »
Heck, even in the Dark Ages, we started the year with school supplies.  I don't remember the teacher sending home a list; certainly it would have been a lot shorter (I'm pretty sure no one was expected to bring boxes of tissues, and hand sanitizer didn't exist.)  But we were expected to have pencils, notebook, eraser, crayons, etc. 

Come to think of it, there must of been some kind of list.  In first grade, I was supposed to have thick pencils for some reason.  The teacher kept telling me to use the fat pencils; my mother kept refusing to buy fat pencils because we had lots of regular pencils.  Why did they keep telling me instead of each other?   ???

I certainly understand getting frustrated with the sheer amount of stuff parents have to buy.  School supplies for two kids ran me almost $200, counting sturdy backpacks.  I had to buy the usual notebooks, paper, giant packs of pencils and pens, but I also had to buy plastic gallon bags, tissue, paper plates, paper cups, hand sanitizer, and dry erase markers for the classroom whiteboard. The amount of stuff that parents are expected to provide for classroom wide use is getting ridiculous. 


But I certainly don't condone the way the dad behaved

One of the things that got me was hand sanitizer and hand soap , it seemed repetitive(they did have a sink in the classroom) dry erase makers would have made me batty ,is there something I don;t know about black boards?   I respect teachers several people in my family are teachers but I remember 1st grade no teachers aid , no student teachers , no twice daily parent volunteers, no wet wipes ect... I don't see that my son came out of 1st grade with an experience that was better by 500 man-hours and $3000 dollars in supplies more expensive. I'm not complaining just musing about all the 'improvements " and how much they actually enriched education.

There is a concern that long term exposure to chalk dust may cause cancer.

RingTailedLemur

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23136 on: August 27, 2013, 06:02:02 AM »
Most schools here have interactive whiteboards now.

Catananche

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23137 on: August 27, 2013, 06:52:19 AM »
Even after living in the USA for a while and having to buy school supplies, the whole system doesn't make sense to me. I was pretty happy to not have to deal with it when we moved back to the Netherlands.

Wouldn't it be easier and cheaper for the school (the school, not the teachers!) to buy the supplies at wholesale prices? The school gets the stuff they need/want, there is enough for everyone, everyone gets the same stuff (no parents complaining that their more expensive supplies get used by everyone) and what's left over gets used the next year. Parents get charged a minimal fee (buying in bulk is cheaper!), the kids have their supplies on their desk at the start of the school year.
Having said all that there might be something glaringly obvious that I'm missing.

The only thing I have bought for my kids when they were in elementary school were pencil cases. Everything else was supplied by the school.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23138 on: August 27, 2013, 07:00:24 AM »
Here's a non-school related SS story.  My best friend lives next to a building that once was a rental property and behind it was a dumpster for the residents to use. 

Years ago, shortly before I flew out to visit her, I guess someone had been evicted and in emptying out the fridge, someone dumped a bunch of raw meat into the dumpster.  This was in August, so of course it didn't take long before it started to smell.  Friend called the rental properties to tell them about the awful smell and asking them to please, please take care of it!  They did empty the dumpster right before I came out and when she told me this story I admit just the thought of it made me nearly gag!

Yesterday however really took the cake.  Friend is used to people emptying things into that dumpster but yesterday two guys pulled up in a beat up pickup truck, pulled forward into the driveway and then used my friend's front yard to turn his truck around so that he could back the truck's bed up to the dumpster!  One guy had gotten out before the driver had done this.  My friend had been on her lunch break, walking her dog when she saw this and she said at first she was just stunned till the old guy says "Hey, how ya doin?"  She said "Okay, until that guy turned that thing of his around in my front yard!!!"

The guy said "Oh he didn't hurt nothin'! Lighten up, lady!"  She responded "Didn't hurt nothin'? That's my front yard and I try to keep it looking decent, and why couldn't he just back into the drive from the street?"   So the guy says "Go ahead, make my day, *female dog*!"  She pulled out her phone and called the owner of the rental properties only to find out that apparently that place is not a rental property anymore, landlord's son lives there now so that dumpster is off limits!

So these guys were dumping their stuff illegally and being really rude to friend in the process in addition to damaging her front yard.  So the guy told her if he sees these people again (she didn't get the license plate #) to call the cops on them.
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Twik

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23139 on: August 27, 2013, 09:46:03 AM »
One of the things that got me was hand sanitizer and hand soap , it seemed repetitive(they did have a sink in the classroom)  dry erase makers would have made me batty ,is there something I don;t know about black boards? 

If you have ever come home from a day of using a blackboard, you'd know! The dust gets into every pore and crevice.

I worked for a while where they used yellow chalk. I was actually convinced I was suffering from jaundice until I realized that the yellow dust had just settled into my skin.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

Kariachi

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23140 on: August 27, 2013, 09:49:23 AM »
Heck, even in the Dark Ages, we started the year with school supplies.  I don't remember the teacher sending home a list; certainly it would have been a lot shorter (I'm pretty sure no one was expected to bring boxes of tissues, and hand sanitizer didn't exist.)  But we were expected to have pencils, notebook, eraser, crayons, etc. 

Come to think of it, there must of been some kind of list.  In first grade, I was supposed to have thick pencils for some reason.  The teacher kept telling me to use the fat pencils; my mother kept refusing to buy fat pencils because we had lots of regular pencils.  Why did they keep telling me instead of each other?   ???

That reminds me of my first grade teacher. Okay, for background, my middle name has a ton of variations, the one I use is a slightly shorter, less formal, more modern one.

This woman decided that what I actually meant to spell was the longer, formal version. Think 'Kristin' versus 'Christine'.

For weeks I'd go to school (where we were learning to write out our names and therefor needed to put the full ones on all our work) and be told my name was spelled 'Christine', then go home and be told that it was 'Kristin'. This lasted until my mother had enough and went to the principal over it.

Worst part, it's not like she had to take my word. Our full names were in the school's computer. She knew how my name was spelled, she just thought her way was better.
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Elfmama

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23141 on: August 27, 2013, 09:50:22 AM »
 
Quote
She responded "Didn't hurt nothin'? That's my front yard and I try to keep it looking decent, and why couldn't he just back into the drive from the street?"
Tell your friend about the advantage of landscaping with large rocks.  Our property is at the end of a now dead-end road.  We had a constant problem of people chewing up the corner of our yard by making a U-turn, instead of pulling a bit into the driveway and making a 3-point turn.  I swapped a bottle of cinnamon-orange cordial for a rock about 2 1/2 - 3 feet around by 1 foot high.  We had the gentleman delivering it drop it in the corner of the yard where the most damage occurred.  It's too heavy to move by hand, and just large enough that if someone tries to drive over it, he will have severe undercarriage damage.  >:D   And it's spray-painted bright white, so there is no reason that someone wouldn't see it.
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exitzero

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23142 on: August 27, 2013, 10:01:58 AM »
There is a special snowflake in the news around here today.

A restaurant owner refused to allow a disabled veteran into his establishment, even after the police showed up and told him that the dog was legit, and he had to allow the man to eat breakfast there.

He then had the nerve to go on TV and MOCK the man and his disability, and act very proud of what he had done.

Now that a boycott and protest against the restaurant have been organized, he has gone an TV and cried about how losing business will hurt his family.

You don't get to have it both ways. You can act like a jerk to the public, or you can have the people patronize your establishment. You don't get to have it both ways.

Redwing

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23143 on: August 27, 2013, 10:32:19 AM »
Heck, even in the Dark Ages, we started the year with school supplies.  I don't remember the teacher sending home a list; certainly it would have been a lot shorter (I'm pretty sure no one was expected to bring boxes of tissues, and hand sanitizer didn't exist.)  But we were expected to have pencils, notebook, eraser, crayons, etc. 

Come to think of it, there must of been some kind of list.  In first grade, I was supposed to have thick pencils for some reason.  The teacher kept telling me to use the fat pencils; my mother kept refusing to buy fat pencils because we had lots of regular pencils.  Why did they keep telling me instead of each other?   ???

That reminds me of my first grade teacher. Okay, for background, my middle name has a ton of variations, the one I use is a slightly shorter, less formal, more modern one.

This woman decided that what I actually meant to spell was the longer, formal version. Think 'Kristin' versus 'Christine'.

For weeks I'd go to school (where we were learning to write out our names and therefor needed to put the full ones on all our work) and be told my name was spelled 'Christine', then go home and be told that it was 'Kristin'. This lasted until my mother had enough and went to the principal over it.

Worst part, it's not like she had to take my word. Our full names were in the school's computer. She knew how my name was spelled, she just thought her way was better.

My last name can be difficult to pronounce.  Very rarely does some one get it correct the first time.  When my daughter was in 6th grade, a substitute teacher was calling the role and pronounced it wrong.  When my daughter said, no, actually, it's *lastname*, the substitute said, no, that's wrong, it's pronounced *otherway*.  My daughter said, I think I know how my last name is pronounced and the teacher replied, well, you're wrong.

I didn't know about this until a few years after the fact. 

Slartibartfast

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23144 on: August 27, 2013, 10:56:36 AM »
Even after living in the USA for a while and having to buy school supplies, the whole system doesn't make sense to me. I was pretty happy to not have to deal with it when we moved back to the Netherlands.

Wouldn't it be easier and cheaper for the school (the school, not the teachers!) to buy the supplies at wholesale prices? The school gets the stuff they need/want, there is enough for everyone, everyone gets the same stuff (no parents complaining that their more expensive supplies get used by everyone) and what's left over gets used the next year. Parents get charged a minimal fee (buying in bulk is cheaper!), the kids have their supplies on their desk at the start of the school year.
Having said all that there might be something glaringly obvious that I'm missing.

The only thing I have bought for my kids when they were in elementary school were pencil cases. Everything else was supplied by the school.

The schools here have this option - you can pay a chunk at the end of the schoolyear and the school will provide your student with their needed supplies at the beginning of the next schoolyear.  This also helps disguise which students are receiving extra help from outside sources (churches, etc.) with their supplies.  It's not really cheaper, though, especially if you tend to buy things from back-to-school sales.