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Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 6548892 times)

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Jones

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23145 on: August 27, 2013, 04:54:18 PM »
You know those articles that used to occasionally appear in women's magazines about "Things I wish my kid's teacher knew about him" ? And how it was supposed to be a sentimental musing, not a literal suggestion to send in to the school ? Yeah, that's changed. Poor teachers  :P

http://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/notes-8-things-tell-childs-teacher-school-starts-155600747.html
She keeps calling her son a special snowflake in the article! I know she is using it as a term if endearment but I find it totally funny!

LadyDyani

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23146 on: August 27, 2013, 04:59:15 PM »
You know those articles that used to occasionally appear in women's magazines about "Things I wish my kid's teacher knew about him" ? And how it was supposed to be a sentimental musing, not a literal suggestion to send in to the school ? Yeah, that's changed. Poor teachers  :P

http://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/notes-8-things-tell-childs-teacher-school-starts-155600747.html
She keeps calling her son a special snowflake in the article! I know she is using it as a term if endearment but I find it totally funny!

Did you read some of the comments?  Wow.
English doesn't borrow from other languages, it follows them down dark alleys and beats them up and searches their pockets for loose grammar.

ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23147 on: August 27, 2013, 05:02:25 PM »
I can say that some of the comments made my day.

Elfmama

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23148 on: August 27, 2013, 05:49:57 PM »
You know those articles that used to occasionally appear in women's magazines about "Things I wish my kid's teacher knew about him" ? And how it was supposed to be a sentimental musing, not a literal suggestion to send in to the school ? Yeah, that's changed. Poor teachers  :P

http://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/notes-8-things-tell-childs-teacher-school-starts-155600747.html
Quote
There was a time when I didn't know enough about my students and that bit me in the butt when I made the grave mistake of using too much sarcasm in the classroom and one of my students had struggled with Autism. She wasn't able to read social clues and know when I was being literal and concrete or sarcastic and abstract. Her mother came in to tell me halfway through the school year, and I wish I had known right away so that I wouldn't have used so much sarcasm in the classroom.
A teacher should not have been using sarcasm toward elementary school-age kids anyway.  LOTS of kids, even those who aren't on the spectrum, don't understand it, well into their teens.
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squeakers

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23149 on: August 27, 2013, 05:58:30 PM »
You know those articles that used to occasionally appear in women's magazines about "Things I wish my kid's teacher knew about him" ? And how it was supposed to be a sentimental musing, not a literal suggestion to send in to the school ? Yeah, that's changed. Poor teachers  :P

http://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/notes-8-things-tell-childs-teacher-school-starts-155600747.html

We actually get questionnaires from the teachers asking those very questions.  It helps the teacher know that Brad is shy but smart, Torie likes math but hates reading and that Harry just lost his favorite uncle so might be on the sad/quiet side.
"I feel sarcasm is the lowest form of wit." "It is so low, in fact, that Miss Manners feels sure you would not want to resort to it yourself, even in your own defense. We do not believe in retaliatory rudeness." Judith Martin

poundcake

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23150 on: August 27, 2013, 06:13:59 PM »
You know those articles that used to occasionally appear in women's magazines about "Things I wish my kid's teacher knew about him" ? And how it was supposed to be a sentimental musing, not a literal suggestion to send in to the school ? Yeah, that's changed. Poor teachers  :P

http://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/notes-8-things-tell-childs-teacher-school-starts-155600747.html
She keeps calling her son a special snowflake in the article! I know she is using it as a term if endearment but I find it totally funny!

That article, and its grammatical problems, made me stabby. Shut up, Snowflake Mom, and let the teachers teach.

Black Delphinium

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23151 on: August 27, 2013, 06:22:25 PM »
You know those articles that used to occasionally appear in women's magazines about "Things I wish my kid's teacher knew about him" ? And how it was supposed to be a sentimental musing, not a literal suggestion to send in to the school ? Yeah, that's changed. Poor teachers  :P

http://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/notes-8-things-tell-childs-teacher-school-starts-155600747.html
She keeps calling her son a special snowflake in the article! I know she is using it as a term if endearment but I find it totally funny!

That article, and its grammatical problems, made me stabby. Shut up, Snowflake Mom, and let the teachers teach.
And she claims to have taught English, that's what kills me.
When angels go bad, they go worse than anyone. Remember, Lucifer was an angel. ~The Marquis De Carabas

lilfox

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23152 on: August 27, 2013, 06:45:24 PM »
A teacher should not have been using sarcasm toward elementary school-age kids anyway.  LOTS of kids, even those who aren't on the spectrum, don't understand it, well into their teens.

From GhostBusters:
Dr Ray Stantz: "Symmetrical book stacking. Just like the Philadelphia mass turbulence of 1947."
Dr. Peter Venkman: "You're right, no human being would stack books like this."

This exchange left me baffled at age 11 because I couldn't figure out why Venkman thought nobody could manage to stack books in a tower.

I would say these days kids might recognize sarcasm at a younger age because it's far more prevalent in pop culture, but they still can't really comprehend it or process it accurately.  Like knowing that someone told a joke but not really understanding why it's funny.

About the article, my dd's preschool sent home a parent survey asking the first four questions plus some other related ones.  Maybe this would be fine for older kids, but how does one define a typical 3-yr old's strengths or weaknesses in any way that makes her unique from most other kids her age?  Or hobbies?  She's 3, she likes picking up rocks. (Dang, I should have put that!)

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23153 on: August 27, 2013, 06:50:23 PM »
A teacher should not have been using sarcasm toward elementary school-age kids anyway.  LOTS of kids, even those who aren't on the spectrum, don't understand it, well into their teens.

From GhostBusters:
Dr Ray Stantz: "Symmetrical book stacking. Just like the Philadelphia mass turbulence of 1947."
Dr. Peter Venkman: "You're right, no human being would stack books like this."

This exchange left me baffled at age 11 because I couldn't figure out why Venkman thought nobody could manage to stack books in a tower.

I would say these days kids might recognize sarcasm at a younger age because it's far more prevalent in pop culture, but they still can't really comprehend it or process it accurately.  Like knowing that someone told a joke but not really understanding why it's funny.

About the article, my dd's preschool sent home a parent survey asking the first four questions plus some other related ones.  Maybe this would be fine for older kids, but how does one define a typical 3-yr old's strengths or weaknesses in any way that makes her unique from most other kids her age?  Or hobbies?  She's 3, she likes picking up rocks. (Dang, I should have put that!)
That's like that show Toddlers me Tiaras when they talk about babies likes, dislikes and ambitions.

I was very pleased that one episode where the boy beat all the girls!

RooRoo

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23154 on: August 27, 2013, 07:10:37 PM »
Actually, I kind of like #2. That is because, when my mother was working in a university's reading & study skills help department, she came across a student who was getting lousy grades; Ds and Fs. He didn't really deserve them, because he was brilliant, and knew his subjects - but his profs couldn't read what he wrote. Awful handwriting, and terrible spelling.

My mom, in spite of lacking credentials, had an instinct for detecting learning disabilities just from reading the students' papers. She suspected dyslexia and sent him for that testing.

Not only did he have dyslexia, but it was profound. It was stunning that he had even graduated from high school, let alone gotten Ds in college.

PCs weren't around then. She did get his profs to let him type all his papers, and to forgive his spelling. Yeah, she went above and beyond for him. He became a family friend. He has had to fight all his life against prejudices against him because he can't spell.  :'( >:(
…though he by no means wished to accept the invitation, he had not yet acquired the necessary power of decidedly saying No.
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Jocelyn

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23155 on: August 27, 2013, 07:25:17 PM »


 Agreed. But alternative is the teachers spend thousands to buy all this for all the  kids in their classes, that does not seem reasonable either. And I think there should be better ways to handle it than tax increases.  There are so many grants and programs ( I spent 5 years researching these for a friend ) that schools could use it's not funny.

But are there enough grants to provide for every school? I would doubt that. And I am not familiar with any grants that agree to provide for a program ad infinitum. Many grant applications now require the grantees to specify in the application how they plan to fund the program after the grant expires. Apparently funding sources are tired of funding the start-ups of promising programs, only to have them collapse when the grantor stops funding them.

Elfmama

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23156 on: August 27, 2013, 07:28:27 PM »
A teacher should not have been using sarcasm toward elementary school-age kids anyway.  LOTS of kids, even those who aren't on the spectrum, don't understand it, well into their teens.

From GhostBusters:
Dr Ray Stantz: "Symmetrical book stacking. Just like the Philadelphia mass turbulence of 1947."
Dr. Peter Venkman: "You're right, no human being would stack books like this."

This exchange left me baffled at age 11 because I couldn't figure out why Venkman thought nobody could manage to stack books in a tower.

I would say these days kids might recognize sarcasm at a younger age because it's far more prevalent in pop culture, but they still can't really comprehend it or process it accurately.  Like knowing that someone told a joke but not really understanding why it's funny.

About the article, my dd's preschool sent home a parent survey asking the first four questions plus some other related ones.  Maybe this would be fine for older kids, but how does one define a typical 3-yr old's strengths or weaknesses in any way that makes her unique from most other kids her age?  Or hobbies?  She's 3, she likes picking up rocks. (Dang, I should have put that!)
That's like that show Toddlers me Tiaras when they talk about babies likes, dislikes and ambitions.
Even newborns definitely have likes and dislikes, as most parents will tell you. One wants to be swaddled tightly, one not at all, one is fine as long as she has her arms free.  But ambitions? To fill as many diapers as possible, probably.  Ask a 3-year-old what she wants to be when she grows up, and she might tell you a ballerina-school teacher-astronaut. (Yes, all at once.) Or, as Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth reportedly did, that she wants to be a horse.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Common sense is not a gift, but a curse.  Because then
you have to deal with all the people who don't have it.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

Jocelyn

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23157 on: August 27, 2013, 07:32:16 PM »

One of the things that got me was hand sanitizer and hand soap , it seemed repetitive(they did have a sink in the classroom)  dry erase makers would have made me batty ,is there something I don;t know about black boards?   

The problem with handwashing is that it takes far longer than giving each kid a squirt of hand sanitizer. If you had 25 students and one sink, how long does it take for everyone to wash their hands? Keeping in mind that a class may have 25 minutes for lunch, even having each child wash their hands in 30 seconds will cut into the lunch time substantially. And trying to continue educational time while kids wash their hands (Susie, it's your turn now, the rest of you keep working) is disruptive.
As for blackboards...once they've been removed from the classroom and replaced with white boards, you're pretty much stuck. Chalkboards also create a lot of chalk dust, which can create a problem for people sensitive to it. Yes, we used to ignore that when I was a kid- but then, they also whipped the ADHD kids for fidgeting.

Jocelyn

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23158 on: August 27, 2013, 07:36:25 PM »
Most schools here have interactive whiteboards now.
The admins suggested our department put these in. The faculty voted unanimously not to do it. There may be some disciplines that find them useful or essential, but I've always found them to be a big pain, in that they rarely do what they're supposed to do.

shhh its me

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23159 on: August 27, 2013, 07:40:25 PM »
I have a very basic list of supplies and even then I get the SS parents who will NOT get the supplies.  2 70 page notebooks (.17 each), 2 pencils (10pack .50), 2 pens (10 pack .97), folder with prongs (.10 each).  I supply markers, color pencils, hand sanitizer, paper towel, copy paper, dry erase markers, extra paper, and so on.  There have been years where I get to itemize my taxes for the couple thousand that I spend on supplies. 

SS parent this year - child comes in every day with a bag of hot chips, a bottle of soda, a subway sandwich, and a few dollars for the afterschool concession stand.  I have spoken with the parents only to get the excuse that they cannot afford supplies.  How about you skip subway or the junk food one day and get your kid some paper and pencils?

Thank you for choosing the "sale" supplies.