Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5263325 times)

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MommyPenguin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23175 on: August 27, 2013, 11:18:33 PM »
Actually, I kind of like #2. That is because, when my mother was working in a university's reading & study skills help department, she came across a student who was getting lousy grades; Ds and Fs. He didn't really deserve them, because he was brilliant, and knew his subjects - but his profs couldn't read what he wrote. Awful handwriting, and terrible spelling.

My mom, in spite of lacking credentials, had an instinct for detecting learning disabilities just from reading the students' papers. She suspected dyslexia and sent him for that testing.

Not only did he have dyslexia, but it was profound. It was stunning that he had even graduated from high school, let alone gotten Ds in college.

PCs weren't around then. She did get his profs to let him type all his papers, and to forgive his spelling. Yeah, she went above and beyond for him. He became a family friend. He has had to fight all his life against prejudices against him because he can't spell.  :'( >:(

Sounds like a friend who has a daughter with what she calls "stealth dyslexia" (not sure if that's a real name or not).  Basically, her daughter is brilliant.  So brilliant, that the fact she's also extremely dyslexic was hidden really well as long as she was just reading, because her mind was able to make the huge leaps that it took to recognize words even without being able to process the order of the letters properly.  She was reading on something crazy, like college level, by third grade.  But in third grade, her mother started really working with her on spelling, and she realized that her daughter couldn't reliably spell the word "she."  In third grade.  After a MONTH of working on it.  And when her daughter could read on a college level!  That was when she realized that something was wrong.  I guess the daughter was just able to compensate for the issue so much that it didn't become apparent until she had to learn to spell.

Bellantara

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23176 on: August 28, 2013, 12:19:05 AM »
Can we please drop the school stories, or move them to their own thread? :) Thanks.

Minmom3

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23177 on: August 28, 2013, 12:23:25 AM »

Schools in California did supply almost everything you needed in Elementary school, at least through the end of the 1990s when no one in my family was in elementary school anymore. I grew up there and remember just getting a folder to bring stuff home because I didn't want it to get messed up. And later elementary buying pens with erasers because the school supplied one were just very plain ball points.

Middle school and up you did have to supply stuff, but you didn't get lists except maybe from the science teacher directly. Otherwise you just got what every pens, pencils, notebooks etc you wanted to use.

I have confirmed this memory with my Mother, because now I live in a state where you get a long list each year of specific school supplies to bring. The first year I had a child in Kindergarten I asked her as I wondered if I had just forgotten school lists.

Hah!  Maybe in YOUR neighborhood in California they supplied everything in the 90's, but not in the two widely separated school districts my children attended in California - from 1990 in Southern California to 2007 in Northern California - K-12 - I had a long list of things to supply for my kids.  The older they got, the shorter but more pricey the items were.

And as SOON as school supplies were all bought, they sent out fund raiser notices that you HAD to participate in, and during our tenure, opting out and giving them a check for "let's don't and say we did" wasn't possible.  We did that as soon as it became possible.  Free public schools in California went the way of the dodo decades ago.  I don't think there was a single month of the school year during which we weren't expected to spend for something.
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Mediancat

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23178 on: August 28, 2013, 08:12:34 AM »
"Fund raiser notices that you HAD to participate in"?

I don't get this.  As in "You will participate or we'll throw your kid/have you arrested?" Because that's the only "HAVE to" I can think of.

Rob
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Goosey

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23179 on: August 28, 2013, 08:19:45 AM »
Can we get away from the school supplies venting?

GregariousIntrovert

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23180 on: August 28, 2013, 08:30:39 AM »
Quote
From GhostBusters:
Dr Ray Stantz: "Symmetrical book stacking. Just like the Philadelphia mass turbulence of 1947."
Dr. Peter Venkman: "You're right, no human being would stack books like this."

This reminds me of a recent SS encounter.  A local theater shows classic movies and a few weeks ago they showed Ghostbusters - a favorite I never got to see on the big screen because I was only 3 when it came out.  I guess times have changed though because one couple brought their 2 toddlers (maybe 3/4 years old?).  For the ENTIRE movie, every 2 minutes I got to hear their little voices asking, "Mommy!! Why are they laughing??"  "Mommy!!! What is funny??" 

afbluebelle

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23181 on: August 28, 2013, 09:40:39 AM »
In the Air Force, we have Physical Fitness tests. I had one today. There I encountered SS inthewayandIdon'tcareus.

We do our 1 1/2 mile run on a 1/4 mile track. It has 6 running lanes, and runners are supposed to stay on the inside. Usually, the track closes for testers, but Miss SS intheway was walking in the outer lane and promised not to get in the way.

Test starts. We all start running. About 2 minutes into the test, Miss SS decides that she wants to jog, so she makes her way into the inner lane. She then gets huffy any time anyone passes her (right or left side). She also couldn't commit to a lane, so you were stuck bobbing and weaving trying to get around, or making a wide sweep around her.

We can't stop to remove her, because that will kill our run time. The testing officials were busy watching for cheating/people passing out/calling out run times. Eventually Miss SS was told sternly to move to the outer track again, but she pitched a fit because "we interrupted her intervals". I'd be more upset over the whole thing, but Miss SS didn't know that our Group Commander (2nd or 3rd highest rank guy on base) was testing that day. I left with my passing score with a huge grin on my face, because Colonel GC was ripping into her. She is not going to have a nice day. >:D


Fore the record, we have 2 outdoor tracks, and indoor track, and running trails. She could have just left and not been a pain in the butt. The green track is better anyway.
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ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23182 on: August 28, 2013, 09:51:12 AM »
"Fund raiser notices that you HAD to participate in"?

I don't get this.  As in "You will participate or we'll throw your kid/have you arrested?" Because that's the only "HAVE to" I can think of.

Rob

No, there is usually a special all-day event at the school for the kids that sold items for the fundraiser and the ones who didn't are kept in a class. That hasn't happened here since Elementary, but it does happen.

ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23183 on: August 28, 2013, 09:53:56 AM »
I nominate the students at my school that nearly run into poles, moving cars, other people, moving bicycles and skateboards with people on them, parked cars, and random fixed objects because they are so oblivious to the world while reading their phones, devices and books while often walking in the road.

Of course, 99% of them have headphones on or earbuds in and can't hear the horns or people objecting to them drifting into their path.

Mel the Redcap

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23184 on: August 28, 2013, 10:19:43 AM »
I nominate the students at my school that nearly run into poles, moving cars, other people, moving bicycles and skateboards with people on them, parked cars, and random fixed objects because they are so oblivious to the world while reading their phones, devices and books while often walking in the road.

Of course, 99% of them have headphones on or earbuds in and can't hear the horns or people objecting to them drifting into their path.

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ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23185 on: August 28, 2013, 10:35:47 AM »
I gasped.

Twik

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23186 on: August 28, 2013, 10:39:50 AM »
That's ... honestly, how can someone have that little sense of self-preservation?  :o
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LadyDyani

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23187 on: August 28, 2013, 10:44:07 AM »
I nominate the students at my school that nearly run into poles, moving cars, other people, moving bicycles and skateboards with people on them, parked cars, and random fixed objects because they are so oblivious to the world while reading their phones, devices and books while often walking in the road.

Of course, 99% of them have headphones on or earbuds in and can't hear the horns or people objecting to them drifting into their path.

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Sigh. Waiting for those pesky traffic lights just takes so long. I'll just cross right now in the middle of the intersection without looking.
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Cherry91

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23188 on: August 28, 2013, 10:57:16 AM »
Best thing is, from the way she turns to look after the vehicle, she probably thinks the driver is at fault and has learned nothing  >:(

pwv

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23189 on: August 28, 2013, 11:23:31 AM »
I'm not sure if this person qualified as a Special Snowflake, or was more of a clueless airhead, or some other term that probably wouldn't get past the filters and would possibly get me banned if I used it.

Today is the 50th anniversary of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech and it reminded me of this incident that happened many, many years ago.

I was watching Maury and he had on talented kids and had some talent scouts in the audience looking for new talent.  One mother became upset that her little precious wasn't picked.  She stood up in the audience and started berating Maury and the judges for not selecting her child, telling them that they were destroying her child's "dream" of becoming a star.   She said something to the effect that "just like Dr. King had a dream, my son also has a dream."  Everyone in the audience started booing her and trying to shout her down, but she just kept on yammering about her son's "dream" and trying to compare it to Dr. King's "I have a dream" speech.

I don't remember if she finally sat down and shut up, or walked out, or what, I was in shock that she actually said what she did.