Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5419891 times)

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Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23205 on: August 28, 2013, 02:21:46 PM »
A teacher should not have been using sarcasm toward elementary school-age kids anyway.  LOTS of kids, even those who aren't on the spectrum, don't understand it, well into their teens.

From GhostBusters:
Dr Ray Stantz: "Symmetrical book stacking. Just like the Philadelphia mass turbulence of 1947."
Dr. Peter Venkman: "You're right, no human being would stack books like this."


I remember seeing this movie when I was in college, thanks to the free movies shown to students on weekends.  As a child the movie had frightened me, but in my late teens suddenly it was hysterical and I was wishing I'd worn Depends or something.   So much of that movie flies over the heads of kids, I think.  I know the part you quoted wasn't fully appreciated till I was an adult.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

LadyDyani

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23206 on: August 28, 2013, 02:27:09 PM »
A teacher should not have been using sarcasm toward elementary school-age kids anyway.  LOTS of kids, even those who aren't on the spectrum, don't understand it, well into their teens.

From GhostBusters:
Dr Ray Stantz: "Symmetrical book stacking. Just like the Philadelphia mass turbulence of 1947."
Dr. Peter Venkman: "You're right, no human being would stack books like this."


I remember seeing this movie when I was in college, thanks to the free movies shown to students on weekends.  As a child the movie had frightened me, but in my late teens suddenly it was hysterical and I was wishing I'd worn Depends or something.   So much of that movie flies over the heads of kids, I think.  I know the part you quoted wasn't fully appreciated till I was an adult.

Haha, my son recently turned 13.  If we watch a movie he first saw as a young child, and something like that comes up, he's taken to pointing at the TV and yelling "I get that now!" and laughing hysterically. This especially happens with movies containing innuendo.
English doesn't borrow from other languages, it follows them down dark alleys and beats them up and searches their pockets for loose grammar.

emwithme

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23207 on: August 28, 2013, 04:26:02 PM »
Actually, I kind of like #2. That is because, when my mother was working in a university's reading & study skills help department, she came across a student who was getting lousy grades; Ds and Fs. He didn't really deserve them, because he was brilliant, and knew his subjects - but his profs couldn't read what he wrote. Awful handwriting, and terrible spelling.

My mom, in spite of lacking credentials, had an instinct for detecting learning disabilities just from reading the students' papers. She suspected dyslexia and sent him for that testing.

Not only did he have dyslexia, but it was profound. It was stunning that he had even graduated from high school, let alone gotten Ds in college.

PCs weren't around then. She did get his profs to let him type all his papers, and to forgive his spelling. Yeah, she went above and beyond for him. He became a family friend. He has had to fight all his life against prejudices against him because he can't spell.  :'( >:(

Sounds like a friend who has a daughter with what she calls "stealth dyslexia" (not sure if that's a real name or not).  Basically, her daughter is brilliant.  So brilliant, that the fact she's also extremely dyslexic was hidden really well as long as she was just reading, because her mind was able to make the huge leaps that it took to recognize words even without being able to process the order of the letters properly.  She was reading on something crazy, like college level, by third grade.  But in third grade, her mother started really working with her on spelling, and she realized that her daughter couldn't reliably spell the word "she."  In third grade.  After a MONTH of working on it.  And when her daughter could read on a college level!  That was when she realized that something was wrong.  I guess the daughter was just able to compensate for the issue so much that it didn't become apparent until she had to learn to spell.

Just like my husband.  He is *ridiculously* clever.  Scary clever.  However, his handwriting looks like a cross between a spider throwing up and a 13 year old boy's.  It hurts me to look at it sometimes - and to look at him when he's writing because he grips the pen SO HARD his whole hand turns white.  He also presses ridiculously hard.

He went to a good British public school and has a good degree in Biochemistry and has recently completed a Masters (in Meat Science - so "bugs on meat").  He has worked in cancer research at top level universities.  (Can you tell I am seriously proud of him?)  He LOVES to read.  However, it takes him SOOOO long to get through even the slimmest of books; even ones that he is interested in. 

It was only in the past two years that he has been tested for dyslexia, and  - what a surprise - he is Seriously Dyslexic.  His general academic levels came out on the 98th percentile - except for reading speed and comprehension, word choice and writing skill, where he didn't score higher than the 45th percentile, so there's a significant discrepancy. 

Fortunately, since he started the testing at the beginning of his Masters course, he was able to get adjustments, such as being given print outs of the slides used in presentations (in advance of the session so he can read through them at his own pace) rather than having to take his own notes at the time, being given extra time in exams and timed writing sessions and also he was allowed extra re-writes of his dissertation. 

However, he is so reluctant to ask for my help it took almost failing his course before he let me look over his dissertation; in the end we did have to have an argument before he let me assist.  Now he has let me re-word his CV and help him with online applications (and he now ticks the "do you need adjustments" box when applying for jobs) he is getting to interview rather than being rejected at the first hurdle. 

I just wish it was picked up on earlier - I really do wish the fact that he enjoyed reading and read for pleasure as a child meant that the school said that there was no way he was dyslexic.

On another point - why is dyslexic so hard to spell.  Surely that's cruel...

VorFemme

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23208 on: August 28, 2013, 05:32:45 PM »

From GhostBusters:
Dr Ray Stantz: "Symmetrical book stacking. Just like the Philadelphia mass turbulence of 1947."
Dr. Peter Venkman: "You're right, no human being would stack books like this."


I remember seeing this movie when I was in college, thanks to the free movies shown to students on weekends.  As a child the movie had frightened me, but in my late teens suddenly it was hysterical and I was wishing I'd worn Depends or something.   So much of that movie flies over the heads of kids, I think.  I know the part you quoted wasn't fully appreciated till I was an adult.
[/quote]

My MIL watched Phantom of the Opera at our house when her son was about 55, I was 51, and she was 75 or so.

We had to explain the subtexts to her as she did not get them.

She wanted to take our copy home and watch it again (musical version) but without us there, now that she understood that there was a lot of Scrabble type subtext going on.  Born in the 1930s and raised without a lot of explanations on birds, bees, babies in the cabbage patch, and all that pre s3xual revolution stuff....

She did still like the movie - just apparently wanted to watch it with just her husband to explain what was being referred to between the lines, as it were.
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

Carotte

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23209 on: August 28, 2013, 05:50:50 PM »

I just wish it was picked up on earlier - I really do wish the fact that he enjoyed reading and read for pleasure as a child meant that the school said that there was no way he was dyslexic.

On another point - why is dyslexic so hard to spell.  Surely that's cruel...

That's mostly what happened to me. I read fine and fast. They (the teacher) did have me see a speech therapist for a while when I started kindergarden I think - I guess it was one of those confunding the B and M sound or something like that.
But I don't remember seeing one in primary school, where they could have actually diagnose the dyslexia.
Turns out I most likely have  "dysorthographie" with a side of dyslexia (couldn't find the word in English) it's like dyslexia (who is more about reading/writting and the order of the letters) but for grammatical rules, conjugating and the likes. They just don't make any sense for me.
Maybe the English language doesn't have that word because it's so much easier than french, clearly those that laid the foundation to this dam*ed language only meant evil.
What is funny is that the only mistakes I do in English are those that I do in French, double letters and forgeting the 'S' of the third person.

At 25 I'm very slowly starting to learn the 'rules' or a few tricks to get by in writing, but don't ask me to remember that X turns out Y because of D unless T when V. I can only do X turns into Y.


ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23210 on: August 28, 2013, 05:59:36 PM »
DH and DS both have a mild form of dyslexia that is only a problem when letters and numbers are combined. Like algebra.

SS driver: I saw you behind me. I saw how fast you were going when you nearly rear-ended my car. I saw your hand gestures and the flipping of your hair that indicated you were upset. However, since I was passing other traffic legally and did not need to change lanes, I did not move over for you. When I did move over to exit, and you passed me, I had a very nice look at your license plate and reported you to the highway patrol along with the description of your car and you as the driver. I do hope they explain the rules of the road to you when they write that nice fat aggressive driving ticket.

This driver was swerving onto the shoulder, tailgating, and making gestures that would make my teen blush. Terrible driver in a very small sporty car. She did not intimidate me or my medium sized SUV.

whipeout

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23211 on: August 29, 2013, 01:21:21 AM »
So I have a question. Where or how can an adult get tested for dyslexia?  My DS2 was tested but to be truthful I felt that the tester didn't do a good job as it was done at the end of his junior year.  He was at the very bottom of his class and the school didn't care at all about him.

AuntieA

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23212 on: August 29, 2013, 04:44:48 AM »
Summer here brings out the shopping tourists - all headed for the largest mall in North America. My sighting today:

Pickup truck with Saskatchewan plates and a rear window decal advertising some company from Maui in a left-turn-only lane as I was in the straight-ahead lane, waiting for the light to turn green. On green, I proceeded straight ahead. Saskatchewan pickup also went straight (in a "MUST TURN LEFT" lane!), then began honking loudly at me. They pulled in behind me, signalling a right turn at the next light, while both the driver and front-seat passenger gave me the classic one-finger salute. I shook my head, laughed, and proceeded on my way when the light became green.
I dream of a world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned.

LadyRoxi

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23213 on: August 29, 2013, 07:54:40 AM »
SS There-is-no-one-but-me-in-the-parking-lot-us

So....I was exiting the parking lot from the hairs dresser. The last store in the fairly large strip mall is a Michaels. The parking lot driving area between the store curb and the begining of the actually parking lines is about three cars wide. This lady (thankfully about 75 feet in front of me) decides to stop. Now where did she decide to stop you ask? Next to the curb where her cart was you ask? Of course not. HA! That would be logical. She stops in the middle of the driving area. A car could have passed her on the outside or on the inside between her and the curb. She FLINGS open her drivers side door, does not look for any cars that might be coming. LEAVES it all the way open. Pops the trunk and goes to unload her cart on the curb. Who does that???? :o >:(

artk2002

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23214 on: August 29, 2013, 12:06:22 PM »
SS There-is-no-one-but-me-in-the-parking-lot-us

So....I was exiting the parking lot from the hairs dresser. The last store in the fairly large strip mall is a Michaels. The parking lot driving area between the store curb and the begining of the actually parking lines is about three cars wide. This lady (thankfully about 75 feet in front of me) decides to stop. Now where did she decide to stop you ask? Next to the curb where her cart was you ask? Of course not. HA! That would be logical. She stops in the middle of the driving area. A car could have passed her on the outside or on the inside between her and the curb. She FLINGS open her drivers side door, does not look for any cars that might be coming. LEAVES it all the way open. Pops the trunk and goes to unload her cart on the curb. Who does that???? :o >:(

By any chance, was the curb right in front of the store red and marked "no parking"? I can see the logic -- "look,  I didn't park in a no parking zone!"
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover. -Mark Twain

hjaye

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23215 on: August 29, 2013, 12:16:09 PM »
Summer here brings out the shopping tourists - all headed for the largest mall in North America. My sighting today:

Pickup truck with Saskatchewan plates and a rear window decal advertising some company from Maui in a left-turn-only lane as I was in the straight-ahead lane, waiting for the light to turn green. On green, I proceeded straight ahead. Saskatchewan pickup also went straight (in a "MUST TURN LEFT" lane!), then began honking loudly at me. They pulled in behind me, signalling a right turn at the next light, while both the driver and front-seat passenger gave me the classic one-finger salute. I shook my head, laughed, and proceeded on my way when the light became green.

I really wonder what people are thinking when they do that.  I had the same thing happen to me a few years ago when I was coming home from work.  I was in down town Dallas stopped at a light.  the lane to my left was a left turn only lane, my lane was a straight ahead lane.  the light turned green, I went straight and the car to my left went straight was well.  They honked long and loud at me and flipped me off because they had to slam on their brakes and get behind me.  they were the ones breaking the traffic laws, and how in Hades was I supposed to know they weren't going to turn, but somehow in their mind, I'm the one who is the bad driver.

On another note, I had a SS driver today.  I was on my motorcycle, I had turned right onto a service type road.  On the right was a Home Depot, if you went straight, you would turn left to get into the parking lot of a small strip mall.  I was slowing down for a stop sign, when a car zoomed past me on my right, and then cut me off.  It turned out she was going to the same location I was.  I didn't say anything to her but I was thinking, was it really worth risking my life just so we could get to the same place at the same time.  As a matter of fact, if she hadn't cut me off, she still would have arrived and parked at the same time as me.

MrTango

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23216 on: August 29, 2013, 12:47:12 PM »
Summer here brings out the shopping tourists - all headed for the largest mall in North America. My sighting today:

Pickup truck with Saskatchewan plates and a rear window decal advertising some company from Maui in a left-turn-only lane as I was in the straight-ahead lane, waiting for the light to turn green. On green, I proceeded straight ahead. Saskatchewan pickup also went straight (in a "MUST TURN LEFT" lane!), then began honking loudly at me. They pulled in behind me, signalling a right turn at the next light, while both the driver and front-seat passenger gave me the classic one-finger salute. I shook my head, laughed, and proceeded on my way when the light became green.

I assume you're talking about the Mall of America in Bloomington, MN?

If so, you might consider parking at the Park & Ride at Fort Snelling and riding the Light Rail to the mall (about $2.00/person and valid for 2.5 hours, or $4/person for a 6-hour pass).  Avoiding the crazy drivers around the MOA is well worth that cost.

snowdragon

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23217 on: August 29, 2013, 02:03:14 PM »
The bicyclist at school who insisted on riding between cars at the stop lights, turning on a red light and cutting off a bus.
  Then flipped off the bus because he had to slam on the brakes to avoid killing her.

MyFamily

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23218 on: August 29, 2013, 03:10:56 PM »
I live in a city that is associated with a certain type of motorcycle.  In fact, there is a fairly big party going on all weekend here celebrating this motorcycle and it means that devotees of these bikes are coming in from all around the world.  It doesn't really affect me much - more traffic, can't get a hotel room so my parents aren't coming this weekend as potentially discussed, but really - they come, they spend money, they have fun and then they leave. 

But there are a few SS riders.  Such as the ones today - a couple driving down the road, one bike in each lane, next to each other, going 5 - 10 miles below the speed limit (they'd speed up and slow down a lot).  During rush hour, on a major road...I was the first car behind them and the line of cars behind me was getting longer and longer. 

So annoying!!!


"The test of good manners is to be patient with bad ones" - Solomon ibn Gabirol

RegionMom

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23219 on: August 29, 2013, 06:10:44 PM »
My town has an annual bike fest, and every year, a local radio host BEGS the riders to "please wear clothes."

Not for safety of road rash or even sunburn, just, "ewww, my eyes, my eyes!"
Fear is temporary...Regret is forever.