Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5649560 times)

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Figgie

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23910 on: October 18, 2013, 08:40:00 PM »
My spouse taught me to drive and as we have never owned a car that wasn't manual transmission, that's what I learned to drive.  :)  And you should have heard the kids complain and complain and complain about having to pass their drivers license behind the wheel exam driving a car with a manual transmission.

Their father told them that these were the only cars we had and if they were going to drive, they needed to learn how to drive cars with  manual transmissions.  In fact, Toyota stopped making 4 door Corollas with manual transmissions and so we are now waiting for the 2014 Honda Civics to start production, as that will be our next car.

The current Corolla (a 2003) has 245,000 miles on it and so it is time for it to be retired to an around town car until if finally dies.  :)

soupmom

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23911 on: October 18, 2013, 09:18:40 PM »
Many, many years ago my DH and I were at a party with my work colleagues.  One of them became extremely inebriated.  Since she lived relatively close to us, we volunteered to drive her home, but she insisted that she had to drive her car home.  We said one of us would drive her until we discovered it was a stickshift, which neither of us knew how to drive.  So we followed her home (should have insisted on taking her home and picking up the car later, but we were young and she was a supervisor...). 

She was doing pretty well driving herself until we reached the place where the two lane country highway became a four-lane divided highway.  You guessed it, she immediately drove onto the wrong side of the road.  It was extremely fortunate that it was about 2 am and traffic was very light.  We drove alongside her in the correct lane, honking and flashing our lights for all we were worth until, at the next opportunity, she moved over into the right lane.  It scared years off our lives, and we weren't that old to begin with!

We decided right then that we'd learn to drive a stickshift as soon as possible.  It was a year or so later, when we were in the market for a second car, that we decided to buy one with a manual transmission.  Learning to drive it was very interesting.  The salesman taught DH just enough to enable him to drive the car home.  He then left it with me, with a quick explanation of how to change gears, and told me to practice while he went to work for a little while.  I drove the car around the neighborhood for almost half an hour before I remembered that I needed to depress the clutch when I changed gears.   When I told DH what I'd done, I thought he was going to faint.

When that car was ready for the junkyard, we bought a car with an automatic transmission to replace it.  However, not long before our sons reached driving age, we bought another stickshift so that they could learn how to drive one.  They loved the car and one son still owns a stickshift himself.  It's been a number of years since I've driven one, but I think could pick it up again pretty easily.

greencat

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23912 on: October 18, 2013, 09:40:25 PM »
One of my very close friends drives a manual transmission truck.  He specifically taught me and another friend to drive it just in case he was too inebriated to drive himself home. 

Resuming special snowflake stories:

I want to nominate every single one of my callers who are not visually impaired, but basically expect me to read everything on the screens they're looking at to them.  I no longer have to actually look at the aforementioned screens while on the calls - I can repeat every bit of text on them while practically asleep.

Iris

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23913 on: October 18, 2013, 09:54:15 PM »
My father taught me how to drive a stick when I was a teen, and I will always be grateful.  After not having driven one in 20 years, I was once able to drive one again with no problem.

Not to all contestants in The Amazing Race: there is a high probability that at some point they will make you drive a stick, so learn before you go.

But it's so funny when they try...
"Can't do anything with children, can you?" the woman said.

Poirot thought you could, but forebore to say so.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23914 on: October 18, 2013, 10:47:59 PM »
My mother tried to teach me to drive stick but she was terrible at explaining the process. It wasn't until DH bought a manual car when we were married that I finally learned how to drive one. I still stalled out a lot at first but it wasn't long before it became second nature. 

We have a van with automatic transmission now and I miss driving stick.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

drzim

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23915 on: October 18, 2013, 11:25:45 PM »
My spouse taught me to drive and as we have never owned a car that wasn't manual transmission, that's what I learned to drive.  :)  And you should have heard the kids complain and complain and complain about having to pass their drivers license behind the wheel exam driving a car with a manual transmission.

Their father told them that these were the only cars we had and if they were going to drive, they needed to learn how to drive cars with  manual transmissions.  In fact, Toyota stopped making 4 door Corollas with manual transmissions and so we are now waiting for the 2014 Honda Civics to start production, as that will be our next car.

The current Corolla (a 2003) has 245,000 miles on it and so it is time for it to be retired to an around town car until if finally dies.  :)

I have a 2008 Toyota Corolla with a manual transmission.  I got the best deal ever on it brand new.....no one wants a stick shift in San Francisco except me, I guess.

BarensMom

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23916 on: October 18, 2013, 11:27:21 PM »
My spouse taught me to drive and as we have never owned a car that wasn't manual transmission, that's what I learned to drive.  :)  And you should have heard the kids complain and complain and complain about having to pass their drivers license behind the wheel exam driving a car with a manual transmission.

Their father told them that these were the only cars we had and if they were going to drive, they needed to learn how to drive cars with  manual transmissions.  In fact, Toyota stopped making 4 door Corollas with manual transmissions and so we are now waiting for the 2014 Honda Civics to start production, as that will be our next car.

The current Corolla (a 2003) has 245,000 miles on it and so it is time for it to be retired to an around town car until if finally dies.  :)

I have a 2008 Toyota Corolla with a manual transmission.  I got the best deal ever on it brand new.....no one wants a stick shift in San Francisco except me, I guess.

I've driven stick shift in the City and you definitely deserve a medal.

drzim

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23917 on: October 18, 2013, 11:34:15 PM »
My spouse taught me to drive and as we have never owned a car that wasn't manual transmission, that's what I learned to drive.  :)  And you should have heard the kids complain and complain and complain about having to pass their drivers license behind the wheel exam driving a car with a manual transmission.

Their father told them that these were the only cars we had and if they were going to drive, they needed to learn how to drive cars with  manual transmissions.  In fact, Toyota stopped making 4 door Corollas with manual transmissions and so we are now waiting for the 2014 Honda Civics to start production, as that will be our next car.

The current Corolla (a 2003) has 245,000 miles on it and so it is time for it to be retired to an around town car until if finally dies.  :)

I have a 2008 Toyota Corolla with a manual transmission.  I got the best deal ever on it brand new.....no one wants a stick shift in San Francisco except me, I guess.

I've driven stick shift in the City and you definitely deserve a medal.

Ha! I *learned* to drive stick shift in the City.  I grew up in the suburbs, but my Dad would drive all the way to SF just to make me practice on the hills.
Good times......

BarensMom

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23918 on: October 18, 2013, 11:37:06 PM »
My spouse taught me to drive and as we have never owned a car that wasn't manual transmission, that's what I learned to drive.  :)  And you should have heard the kids complain and complain and complain about having to pass their drivers license behind the wheel exam driving a car with a manual transmission.

Their father told them that these were the only cars we had and if they were going to drive, they needed to learn how to drive cars with  manual transmissions.  In fact, Toyota stopped making 4 door Corollas with manual transmissions and so we are now waiting for the 2014 Honda Civics to start production, as that will be our next car.

The current Corolla (a 2003) has 245,000 miles on it and so it is time for it to be retired to an around town car until if finally dies.  :)

I have a 2008 Toyota Corolla with a manual transmission.  I got the best deal ever on it brand new.....no one wants a stick shift in San Francisco except me, I guess.

I've driven stick shift in the City and you definitely deserve a medal.

Ha! I *learned* to drive stick shift in the City.  I grew up in the suburbs, but my Dad would drive all the way to SF just to make me practice on the hills.
Good times......

Did you ever try driving up Moeser Lane in El Cerrito with a stick?  Now that was suicidal.

Isilleke

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23919 on: October 19, 2013, 02:57:50 AM »
Here it's the other way around. I know exactly one person who doesn't have a stick shift...

I always wondered why it was such an achievement on the web to know how to drive one, but now I know!

SS story:
This week on the bus a young girl refused to take her backpack off the seat next to her, while there were at least 15 people standing. No one said anything, but it irks me that she thinks that her having 2 seats is more important than at least one other person sitting.

perpetua

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23920 on: October 19, 2013, 03:03:51 AM »
I am nominating the person ahead of me in the left-turn-arrow governed lane earlier today.  The light turned green.  They lurched forward a few feet - so they obviously saw it - and then stopped.  There was nothing in the road that would have caused them to pause.


I honked a lot and they finally moved.


I'm sorry, but I would call you the SS in that situation.  The way you described it, it sounds like they were in a stick.  If they were new to it, or if something was wrong, it's very easy to have it stall after lurching forward a little like that.  You "honking a lot" made it no easier on that driver trying to get going again.  I was always so nervous while learning to drive a stick that I would have a driver react that way to me.  A little patience and giving the other person the benefit of the doubt goes a lot longer than laying on your horn.

Assuming that guess is correct: the only SS in this situation was the person who couldn't drive a manual car properly or safely, yet still thought she was entitled to go out on the road and put other road users at risk because of it.

It absolutely horrifies me that people are allowed out on the road while not in full control of their vehicles. If you don't know how to use the clutch you are not in full control.

SDG31000

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23921 on: October 19, 2013, 03:38:31 AM »
Yesterday DH drove me to "work" ( I volunteer at a charity shop ) at the local shopping centre.  Cue our encounter with a special snowflake who thought it was ok to be on his mobile phone while riding a bike.  He was weaving all over the road, including into the path of oncoming cars, turned into a car park without signalling in any way what so ever and then cut between parked cars to pull out in front of us forcing DH to apply the brakes.  Thankfully DH was watching him and was going very slowly otherwise he would have been hit.  DH muttered to himself about this person needing to get off his phone and pay attention to what he was doing and then stopped the car to let me out.  Cue this idiot being very aggressive, shouting and threatening to punch DH out and calling him a ginger offspring of unmarried parents or words to that effect.
I was really shaken up, but took DH's advice and just walked away as quickly as I could.  DH just drove away and left special snowflake shouting at himself.

KenveeB

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23922 on: October 19, 2013, 08:13:41 AM »
Assuming that guess is correct: the only SS in this situation was the person who couldn't drive a manual car properly or safely, yet still thought she was entitled to go out on the road and put other road users at risk because of it.

It absolutely horrifies me that people are allowed out on the road while not in full control of their vehicles. If you don't know how to use the clutch you are not in full control.

I'm with you, perpetua. If you don't know how to drive a stick, you practice in a parking lot or something. It's one thing if your car has a sudden malfunction, but to intentionally go out in a car you're not able to drive properly? And then blame people around you for being upset you are blocking the rest of them because you can't drive your own car? Definitely SS.

HorseFreak

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23923 on: October 19, 2013, 09:52:23 AM »
Yesterday DH drove me to "work" ( I volunteer at a charity shop ) at the local shopping centre.  Cue our encounter with a special snowflake who thought it was ok to be on his mobile phone while riding a bike.  He was weaving all over the road, including into the path of oncoming cars, turned into a car park without signalling in any way what so ever and then cut between parked cars to pull out in front of us forcing DH to apply the brakes.  Thankfully DH was watching him and was going very slowly otherwise he would have been hit.  DH muttered to himself about this person needing to get off his phone and pay attention to what he was doing and then stopped the car to let me out.  Cue this idiot being very aggressive, shouting and threatening to punch DH out and calling him a ginger offspring of unmarried parents or words to that effect.
I was really shaken up, but took DH's advice and just walked away as quickly as I could.  DH just drove away and left special snowflake shouting at himself.

A bicyclist once went completely psycho on my dad's car while we were driving up a mountain road that's part of a national park. We were driving on the correct side of the road doing the speed limit (25 mph) when Mr. Anger Issues came speeding down the WRONG side of the road directly at us going at least 50 mph. My dad stopped the car while the guy gestured and screamed at us to get out of the way. He nearly rode right into our stopped car despite having 15+ feet on the correct side to ride. He banged on the car and screamed obscenities about respecting bikes as he went by. I wish a ranger had been there because the speed limit applies to bikes as well.

mmswm

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23924 on: October 19, 2013, 11:00:35 AM »
Many, many years ago my DH and I were at a party with my work colleagues.  One of them became extremely inebriated.  Since she lived relatively close to us, we volunteered to drive her home, but she insisted that she had to drive her car home.  We said one of us would drive her until we discovered it was a stickshift, which neither of us knew how to drive.  So we followed her home (should have insisted on taking her home and picking up the car later, but we were young and she was a supervisor...). 

She was doing pretty well driving herself until we reached the place where the two lane country highway became a four-lane divided highway.  You guessed it, she immediately drove onto the wrong side of the road.  It was extremely fortunate that it was about 2 am and traffic was very light.  We drove alongside her in the correct lane, honking and flashing our lights for all we were worth until, at the next opportunity, she moved over into the right lane.  It scared years off our lives, and we weren't that old to begin with!

We decided right then that we'd learn to drive a stickshift as soon as possible.  It was a year or so later, when we were in the market for a second car, that we decided to buy one with a manual transmission.  Learning to drive it was very interesting.  The salesman taught DH just enough to enable him to drive the car home.  He then left it with me, with a quick explanation of how to change gears, and told me to practice while he went to work for a little while.  I drove the car around the neighborhood for almost half an hour before I remembered that I needed to depress the clutch when I changed gears.   When I told DH what I'd done, I thought he was going to faint.

When that car was ready for the junkyard, we bought a car with an automatic transmission to replace it.  However, not long before our sons reached driving age, we bought another stickshift so that they could learn how to drive one.  They loved the car and one son still owns a stickshift himself.  It's been a number of years since I've driven one, but I think could pick it up again pretty easily.

This is exactly why my father insisted that we learn to drive a stick if we wanted to learn how to drive. He wanted to make sure we were *never* in any situation where we might make unsafe decisions because of a vehicle we couldn't drive.

Of course that didn't help the other night when I had to leave my own car in a parking lot because I was in no shape to drive.  My companion could drive a stick, but we had both cars, so we left my car and went back for it the next day.  That particular parking lot is pretty much the only one in the county I'd feel safe leaving my car, which is one of the reasons that place is my primary hang out.
Some people lift weights.  I lift measures.  It's a far more esoteric workout. - (Quoted from a personal friend)