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Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 6744800 times)

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Psychopoesie

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23940 on: October 19, 2013, 09:55:33 PM »
I am nominating the person ahead of me in the left-turn-arrow governed lane earlier today.  The light turned green.  They lurched forward a few feet - so they obviously saw it - and then stopped.  There was nothing in the road that would have caused them to pause.


I honked a lot and they finally moved.


I'm sorry, but I would call you the SS in that situation.  The way you described it, it sounds like they were in a stick.  If they were new to it, or if something was wrong, it's very easy to have it stall after lurching forward a little like that.  You "honking a lot" made it no easier on that driver trying to get going again.  I was always so nervous while learning to drive a stick that I would have a driver react that way to me.  A little patience and giving the other person the benefit of the doubt goes a lot longer than laying on your horn.

Assuming that guess is correct: the only SS in this situation was the person who couldn't drive a manual car properly or safely, yet still thought she was entitled to go out on the road and put other road users at risk because of it.

It absolutely horrifies me that people are allowed out on the road while not in full control of their vehicles. If you don't know how to use the clutch you are not in full control.
I disagree with you on several points. First of all, having problems with your car, does not in any way mean that the person copuld not drive the car properly or safely. stuff happens.

Second of all OP was SS for honkin a lot. Honking, when not to prevent an immediat danger (and in case of imediate danger you usualy do not have the time and reactionspeed to honk) or a modest honk for a person stopped at a green light, is unnecesary and SS. I am personaly of the opinion that the horn is one of the most useless and most abused features on cars.

Agree with marcel.

Elfmama

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23941 on: October 19, 2013, 10:29:37 PM »
Better link: http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/co-ed-don-hate-rich-article-1.1489621
What an interesting assumption! She assumes that people are looking at her and judging her for being 'a little princess spending Daddy's money', instead of assuming they are looking at her because she is enchanting to look at.

Or that they're thinking "Oh, that poor girl.  She can only afford junk food.  So sad."
But maybe she's, like, a mind reader?  Because I, poor worthless peasant  that I am, don't live in NYC and don't even recognize the name of the store.   I assume, from Miss Princess's tone, that it is a pricey handbag/shoe store.  I, you see, would be looking at her and wondering "Mulberry?  What's that?  Some sort of bargain basement?"   Because her clothes aren't any different from the kind of stuff you see in Sears or Target.
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Winterlight

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23942 on: October 19, 2013, 10:34:07 PM »
I'd probably be thinking that wearing shorts with nylons underneath defeats the purpose.
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Addy

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23943 on: October 19, 2013, 10:52:00 PM »
I'd probably be thinking that wearing shorts with nylons underneath defeats the purpose.

I'd be thinking that is one of the most ill-fitting and unflattering outfits I have ever seen.

What I would like to know is what kind of look these women were giving her that she was immediately able to divine their contempt of her. That must have been one heck of a glare.

Ereine

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23944 on: October 19, 2013, 10:55:41 PM »
Smokers on the train. My mother came to visit me recently and her train was late. As the train door opened, the guard stood at the doorway and yelled at everyone to get back, refusing to let them out. She was quite brusque and shut the door in their faces after my mum got out.

Mum told me the story afterwards. They were meant to have two smoke breaks on the trip but they were instructed to make them short. Most of the smokers didn't stop at one cigarette and delayed the train, which could not leave until they were back on board. (Long distance train, they all had luggage which would have to be found and removed if they did not return.) There was a long announcement that because of the delay, the second smoke break was cancelled so they could try to make up time. The ten people who were at the entrance were the smokers who got up anyway, fully intending to push their way off the train and get their smoke break anyway.

I do feel sorry for any smoker who obeyed instructions at the first stop since they were punished for the others actions but most of them were totally willing to put their own need for a cigarette over several hundred people being on time.

There was a woman here who got left behind in a similar situation, while her ten year old child was in the train when it left. She went to the media about how unfair it was, how her daughter was so traumatized (apparently she just called her father, who called the train company) and how was she to know that if a train is delayed it's going to leave as soon as possible and there won't be time for a smoke break. It was a very busy station and it was impossible to know which people on the platform belonged to which train and if they were going to come back so the train just leaves (it seems that our trains are harsher too, they don't care about people's luggage, it would just be taken to lost and found at the end, if it wasn't stolen, unless the owner contacted the train, I guess that they'd probably put it in a safe place then).

Slartibartfast

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23945 on: October 19, 2013, 10:57:06 PM »
She does sound like a piece of work, but I can understand the underlying sentiment.  I spent several years in elementary through middle school refusing to wear flattering-looking or even new clothes, because my school was very homogeneous middle class and I, as a doctor's daughter, got quite a few snotty comments about being the "rich girl" from my peers.  This is despite my parents taking a fantastic attitude about money (we never knew how much dad earned, we always had enough for what we needed and a smattering of what we wanted but we were by no means spoiled, and my parents were careful to make sure we learned early on to make purchasing decisions based on quality and usefulness and not advertising/peer pressure/brand names/etc.)  I learned to never talk about money, ever, and to lie about how much things cost sometimes because people would judge me for them if I didn't.  (My sister and I shared a new car in high school, for example - we did get a fantastic price because my grandfather was a VP at GM, so the cost of a new car wasn't that much more than a used car.  We paid for gas, but my parents paid for the car.  I told everyone I was putting part of my summer job money toward the car, because that's what all my friends did . . .)

So yeah, long story short, I'm not trying to apologize for her - but I don't think she should have to defend her financial circumstances, either.  I'll admit I'm not comfortable with the tone of some of the comments here, in the "poor little rich girl" vein - she chose an irritating way to express her opinion, and she may well be spoiled/bratty/etc., but bullying about one's financial situation can go both ways.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23946 on: October 20, 2013, 12:13:15 AM »
 Wonder if she realizes her look is about 20 years old...

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_10aFhip_TXQ/SmiFfbDpzkI/AAAAAAAAAk4/pwP2ehCnu2k/s1600-h/Babysitters+Club.jpg

When I see girls wearing pantyhose under shorts, I think of this.

Iris

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23947 on: October 20, 2013, 12:46:47 AM »
She does sound like a piece of work, but I can understand the underlying sentiment.  I spent several years in elementary through middle school refusing to wear flattering-looking or even new clothes, because my school was very homogeneous middle class and I, as a doctor's daughter, got quite a few snotty comments about being the "rich girl" from my peers.  This is despite my parents taking a fantastic attitude about money (we never knew how much dad earned, we always had enough for what we needed and a smattering of what we wanted but we were by no means spoiled, and my parents were careful to make sure we learned early on to make purchasing decisions based on quality and usefulness and not advertising/peer pressure/brand names/etc.)  I learned to never talk about money, ever, and to lie about how much things cost sometimes because people would judge me for them if I didn't.  (My sister and I shared a new car in high school, for example - we did get a fantastic price because my grandfather was a VP at GM, so the cost of a new car wasn't that much more than a used car.  We paid for gas, but my parents paid for the car.  I told everyone I was putting part of my summer job money toward the car, because that's what all my friends did . . .)

So yeah, long story short, I'm not trying to apologize for her - but I don't think she should have to defend her financial circumstances, either.  I'll admit I'm not comfortable with the tone of some of the comments here, in the "poor little rich girl" vein - she chose an irritating way to express her opinion, and she may well be spoiled/bratty/etc., but bullying about one's financial situation can go both ways.

And if people expect her to defend her financial circumstances, then they're rude and bullies. That didn't happen here, though. This post just riffed off a look two women supposedly gave her which could have been indigestion as far as she knows.

Also, the reality is that if someone posts a blog about the problems associated with being lucky enough to be born into a wealthy family then that would be an interesting look into someone else's life and I would read that with interest. The moment they start looking for sympathy, though, they will have to look really *really* hard because I've been poor and I've been comfortable (though never wealthy) and although yes, there are real problems that come with more money they are nothing, nothing compared to the problem of worrying about the basic necessities of life. We can expect our friends to listen to our problems without saying "Yeah, but some people don't have enough food, you whinger!" but surely she should know by now that the internet is not populated by her friends. Overall I suspect she's not a bad person, just young and perhaps a unaware of what life is like for most people.

As to her clothes, meh. I wouldn't dress that way and I wouldn't spend a lot of money on clothes that seem from the photo to be equivalent to the Target version, but I'm not her and it's her money and her body so whatever floats her boat.
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kherbert05

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23948 on: October 20, 2013, 12:55:58 AM »
Smokers on the train. My mother came to visit me recently and her train was late. As the train door opened, the guard stood at the doorway and yelled at everyone to get back, refusing to let them out. She was quite brusque and shut the door in their faces after my mum got out.

Mum told me the story afterwards. They were meant to have two smoke breaks on the trip but they were instructed to make them short. Most of the smokers didn't stop at one cigarette and delayed the train, which could not leave until they were back on board. (Long distance train, they all had luggage which would have to be found and removed if they did not return.) There was a long announcement that because of the delay, the second smoke break was cancelled so they could try to make up time. The ten people who were at the entrance were the smokers who got up anyway, fully intending to push their way off the train and get their smoke break anyway.

I do feel sorry for any smoker who obeyed instructions at the first stop since they were punished for the others actions but most of them were totally willing to put their own need for a cigarette over several hundred people being on time.

There was a woman here who got left behind in a similar situation, while her ten year old child was in the train when it left. She went to the media about how unfair it was, how her daughter was so traumatized (apparently she just called her father, who called the train company) and how was she to know that if a train is delayed it's going to leave as soon as possible and there won't be time for a smoke break. It was a very busy station and it was impossible to know which people on the platform belonged to which train and if they were going to come back so the train just leaves (it seems that our trains are harsher too, they don't care about people's luggage, it would just be taken to lost and found at the end, if it wasn't stolen, unless the owner contacted the train, I guess that they'd probably put it in a safe place then).


She is the one that left the kid on the train. Someone obviously taught the child to handle a mix up like that. Good job to them.


I think you area is easier not harsher about the luggage. The luggage has to be taken off if owner isn't on board sounds like anti-terrorism rules not being nice and giving the passenger his/her luggage rules.
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Ereine

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23949 on: October 20, 2013, 02:59:01 AM »
Terrorism isn't really an everyday concern here. Also the way the trains are set up it can be impossible to know if the luggage has been abandoned or if the owner has spent the whole trip in the restaurant car (which isn't smart as there can be thieves but it happens) and the employees can't really keep track of every suitcase at every station.

greencat

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23950 on: October 20, 2013, 04:31:03 AM »
I am nominating the person ahead of me in the left-turn-arrow governed lane earlier today.  The light turned green.  They lurched forward a few feet - so they obviously saw it - and then stopped.  There was nothing in the road that would have caused them to pause.


I honked a lot and they finally moved.


I'm sorry, but I would call you the SS in that situation.  The way you described it, it sounds like they were in a stick.  If they were new to it, or if something was wrong, it's very easy to have it stall after lurching forward a little like that.  You "honking a lot" made it no easier on that driver trying to get going again.  I was always so nervous while learning to drive a stick that I would have a driver react that way to me.  A little patience and giving the other person the benefit of the doubt goes a lot longer than laying on your horn.

Assuming that guess is correct: the only SS in this situation was the person who couldn't drive a manual car properly or safely, yet still thought she was entitled to go out on the road and put other road users at risk because of it.

It absolutely horrifies me that people are allowed out on the road while not in full control of their vehicles. If you don't know how to use the clutch you are not in full control.
I disagree with you on several points. First of all, having problems with your car, does not in any way mean that the person copuld not drive the car properly or safely. stuff happens.

Second of all OP was SS for honkin a lot. Honking, when not to prevent an immediat danger (and in case of imediate danger you usualy do not have the time and reactionspeed to honk) or a modest honk for a person stopped at a green light, is unnecesary and SS. I am personaly of the opinion that the horn is one of the most useless and most abused features on cars.

I had, in fact, previously pointed out that it was highly unlikely that the person was having "problems with their car," as far as stalling due to not knowing how to drive a manual, as it was fairly obvious that they deliberately braked rather than stalled, especially since they were driving a vehicle that does not come with a manual transmission option.

The traffic signal in question is fairly short - so a "lot" of honking was maybe 10-15 seconds of me tapping the horn repeatedly, rather than laying on it - I don't use my horn very frequently, so perhaps my standards for "honking a lot" are a bit different than what people think when they read that.

The time to make a decision about which way you are traveling is prior to entering the turn lane, not after you've sat through a cycle of the light and started moving forward on the green arrow.  The decision to allow your own poor planning or lack of information to impede the flow of traffic is SS.  They had moved forward enough to not just impede the flow of the turn lane, but also enough to be sticking out into the crossing lane of traffic.  It is fairly within the bounds of etiquette for using the horn to apply it in the fashion that I did - to get a single driver to move on their traffic signal.
« Last Edit: October 20, 2013, 04:36:01 AM by greencat »

perpetua

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23951 on: October 20, 2013, 05:01:24 AM »
I am nominating the person ahead of me in the left-turn-arrow governed lane earlier today.  The light turned green.  They lurched forward a few feet - so they obviously saw it - and then stopped.  There was nothing in the road that would have caused them to pause.


I honked a lot and they finally moved.


I'm sorry, but I would call you the SS in that situation.  The way you described it, it sounds like they were in a stick.  If they were new to it, or if something was wrong, it's very easy to have it stall after lurching forward a little like that.  You "honking a lot" made it no easier on that driver trying to get going again.  I was always so nervous while learning to drive a stick that I would have a driver react that way to me.  A little patience and giving the other person the benefit of the doubt goes a lot longer than laying on your horn.

Assuming that guess is correct: the only SS in this situation was the person who couldn't drive a manual car properly or safely, yet still thought she was entitled to go out on the road and put other road users at risk because of it.

It absolutely horrifies me that people are allowed out on the road while not in full control of their vehicles. If you don't know how to use the clutch you are not in full control.
I disagree with you on several points. First of all, having problems with your car, does not in any way mean that the person copuld not drive the car properly or safely. stuff happens.

Agreed, problems can happen at any time but the PP specifically said 'if she was new to it' and that's what I was addressing. If you're that new to a manual that you can't drive it without bunny-hopping down the road (the 'lurching forward a few feet' then coming to a sudden halt is a classic symptom of letting the clutch up far too quickly because you don't know how to control it properly and stalling it), then you can't drive it safely and you shouldn't be out in it. Doing so at the inconvenience (and potential safety) of other road users is the definition of an SS in my book.
« Last Edit: October 20, 2013, 05:06:37 AM by perpetua »

mmswm

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23952 on: October 20, 2013, 08:20:48 AM »
She does sound like a piece of work, but I can understand the underlying sentiment.  I spent several years in elementary through middle school refusing to wear flattering-looking or even new clothes, because my school was very homogeneous middle class and I, as a doctor's daughter, got quite a few snotty comments about being the "rich girl" from my peers.  This is despite my parents taking a fantastic attitude about money (we never knew how much dad earned, we always had enough for what we needed and a smattering of what we wanted but we were by no means spoiled, and my parents were careful to make sure we learned early on to make purchasing decisions based on quality and usefulness and not advertising/peer pressure/brand names/etc.)  I learned to never talk about money, ever, and to lie about how much things cost sometimes because people would judge me for them if I didn't.  (My sister and I shared a new car in high school, for example - we did get a fantastic price because my grandfather was a VP at GM, so the cost of a new car wasn't that much more than a used car.  We paid for gas, but my parents paid for the car.  I told everyone I was putting part of my summer job money toward the car, because that's what all my friends did . . .)

So yeah, long story short, I'm not trying to apologize for her - but I don't think she should have to defend her financial circumstances, either.  I'll admit I'm not comfortable with the tone of some of the comments here, in the "poor little rich girl" vein - she chose an irritating way to express her opinion, and she may well be spoiled/bratty/etc., but bullying about one's financial situation can go both ways.

I couldn't figure out how to say this myself.  I agree with every word. This woman chose an extremely irritating way to express the thoughts, but I can understand the underlying sentiment. I'm broker than broke now, but my parents are not. I remember being almost embarrassed to bring friends home because of how big/fancy the house is.  Even recently, when my (now ex) boyfriend met my parents for the first time there were issues. He's a solidly blue-collar truck driver, and he took one look at the property, house and the stuff that's in it and had a major attack of insecurity over the difference in what my parents are able to provide and what he'd ever be able to provide. It's not that this kind of stuff makes any difference to me (and honestly, while I love the house, it's a royal pain to take care of because it's just so big).  All I care about is being able to keep a roof over my head and food in the fridge.  It took a while before he understood that. Neither of my parents grew up wealthy.  My mom was a farmer's kid and my dad was an Air Force brat.  Dad is self-made. And the world's biggest cheapskate.  He did splurge on the house, but he drives an 11 year old truck. My mom's washer and dryer are 10 years old.  The dishwasher is broken beyond repair but since it's not a necessity, and he hasn't found a good enough deal on a new one, he won't replace it. He could really use a new lawn mower, but since he can still fix the old one, he won't buy a new one.  He does all the work on his vehicles (a trait he passed to me), and all the repairs on the house.  The only time I've seen him hire somebody to do something was when the 700 foot driveway needed to be repaved.  Anyway, the point is that in spite of the fact that we were raised to not take money for granted, there are still issues that can crop up socially. This woman went about expressing it in all the wrong ways, but the sentiment is still true.
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NyaChan

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23953 on: October 20, 2013, 08:35:32 AM »
I get the sentiment: I had a colleague in law school who was super friendly and nice to me...until he figured out that I wasn't drowning in debt and came to school without a job already lined up.  Then he started associating me with the stupid rich kids who are worthless and lazy - and yes those are the words he used, well, the nicer ones at least. 

Despite running into people like that from time to time, you wouldn't ever find me writing a "Oh poor-not-poor me" piece.  Did it make me feel bad? Yes, because I thought that was a friend.  Other than that, I figure it is up to me to know that I worked hard to get where I am and if the words hit too close to home, maybe it is time to reevaluate how much I am doing for myself. 

Ereine

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #23954 on: October 20, 2013, 08:37:45 AM »
I think that there are many sentiments that are true behind special snowflakes and the way they are expressed is what makes someone ss. On the opposite side of the spectrum there might someone who's poor and resents not being able to afford things. That isn't ss until she thinks that it makes her entitled to her relatives' things or something.  Or being frustrated with customer service or hating traffic, it's not really the emotion behind the action that matter, just how it's handled.