News: All new forum theme!  See Forum Announcements for more information. 

  • September 04, 2015, 08:00:01 AM

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 6750007 times)

5 Members and 7 Guests are viewing this topic.

PastryGoddess

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6181
    • My Image Portfolio and Store
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24030 on: October 24, 2013, 10:04:05 PM »
I went back and looked at the video.  Despite the show stealingness, the little girl was actually still doing the choreography.  She just added some extra steps and movements to every single thing
Maryland

Iris

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3867
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24031 on: October 25, 2013, 01:35:24 AM »
This video is all over the internet currently:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ab9M_St6bPk

Almost all the comments abut the little girl are positive: about her enthusiasm, cuteness, and show-stealingness.

Honestly, I feel sorry for all the other girls who were trying to stick to their routine.  Especially that girl on the end, she was just about isolated out there and was really doing well, despite the disruption.


I have attended most of my niece's dance recitals and I have to say, this is perfectly normal.

There is always at least one kid (or more) with flair. There is always at least one kid who stands still and gapes at the audience, despite the best efforts of their class and the helpers to push them along. And there are all the kids in between, who sometimes get the routine and sometimes get distracted by their neighbour, the clapping, the lights, etc. You don't really see everyone dancing the exact same steps until the higher grades. Even then, there are still people who dance noticeably better than others.

The only thing the teachers ever suggested ( that I know of) was skipping the child ahead to a higher grade level or having private lessons at a higher level, because sometimes they were bored with the baby steps that their peers were doing.

This. One or the other of my DDs have been doing ballet consistently for 14 years. That's 28 concerts. In the tiny tots dance there is always one child like this, or one child who just gets overwhelmed and cries. The response to this actually surprised me a bit because it was just same old, same old to me.
"Can't do anything with children, can you?" the woman said.

Poirot thought you could, but forebore to say so.

kherbert05

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 11117
    • Trees downed in my yard by Ike and the clean up
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24032 on: October 25, 2013, 05:42:37 AM »
I agree the little girl is doing the steps just will extra flair. I suspect she is in her own kid logic way following the teacher's instructions to do the dance with pep or something. She also looks like in a kid logic way she is trying to pep up the others - who look overwelmed/scared.


I disagree with the they should have put her on the end idea. I think they should have put her front and center. I know at ON, Loren, Brett's recitals the confident, enthusiastic kid is often in the front and center. Their confidence tends to pep up the other kids. (Of course when they were Toddler to lower elementary that kid tended to be ON, Loren, Brett, and their first cousin those four have confidence to burn and energy to solve the world's power problems.)
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

flickan

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 192
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24033 on: October 25, 2013, 06:44:38 AM »
I agree the little girl is doing the steps just will extra flair. I suspect she is in her own kid logic way following the teacher's instructions to do the dance with pep or something. She also looks like in a kid logic way she is trying to pep up the others - who look overwelmed/scared.


I disagree with the they should have put her on the end idea. I think they should have put her front and center. I know at ON, Loren, Brett's recitals the confident, enthusiastic kid is often in the front and center. Their confidence tends to pep up the other kids. (Of course when they were Toddler to lower elementary that kid tended to be ON, Loren, Brett, and their first cousin those four have confidence to burn and energy to solve the world's power problems.)

I agree with this very much.

They're toddlers.  Whether they're having fun is the most important thing.  If you put the most enthusiastic one front and center then she's not in anyone's way.  She does seem to be doing the steps and not just goofing off.  I have a hard time believing the parents of the other girls could be that upset by it, it's all very silly and charming.  (Now whether they'd be upset about her getting the spolight is another issue but if you're that invested in your kid being prima donna at age 3 you've got bigger problems) 

Most importantly, this is not going to make or break anyone's ballet career.  It's just a kiddie dance class.  If it were a class of seven year olds it would be different but expecting kids this age to have stage discipline is crazy.  She's got stage presence at an early age-- and that's a credit to her if she continues in dance.

thunderroad

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 210
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24034 on: October 25, 2013, 06:50:59 AM »
This video is all over the internet currently:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ab9M_St6bPk

Almost all the comments abut the little girl are positive: about her enthusiasm, cuteness, and show-stealingness.

Honestly, I feel sorry for all the other girls who were trying to stick to their routine.  Especially that girl on the end, she was just about isolated out there and was really doing well, despite the disruption.


I have attended most of my niece's dance recitals and I have to say, this is perfectly normal.

There is always at least one kid (or more) with flair. There is always at least one kid who stands still and gapes at the audience, despite the best efforts of their class and the helpers to push them along. And there are all the kids in between, who sometimes get the routine and sometimes get distracted by their neighbour, the clapping, the lights, etc. You don't really see everyone dancing the exact same steps until the higher grades. Even then, there are still people who dance noticeably better than others.

The only thing the teachers ever suggested ( that I know of) was skipping the child ahead to a higher grade level or having private lessons at a higher level, because sometimes they were bored with the baby steps that their peers were doing.

This. One or the other of my DDs have been doing ballet consistently for 14 years. That's 28 concerts. In the tiny tots dance there is always one child like this, or one child who just gets overwhelmed and cries. The response to this actually surprised me a bit because it was just same old, same old to me.

I agree.  I have sat thru enough preschool  performances and recitals to know that at young ages, anything can happen--and in most instances, the audience is entranced both by the performances and by the outliers who are trying but end up doing their own thing.

Ever been to a T-ball game for 5-year-olds? The kids run to the wrong base, fight their teammates for the ball when they are fielding, sit down in the baseline to play in the dirt, wander off the field and have to be reminded to stay where they are put, and more.  It's all part of their learning process and development, as they learn both the rules of the game or activity and how to control their own impulses. 

And now, years and years later, after countless innings of baseless in which I proudly watched my son play and play well, somehow those fumbling early games are my favorites. 

o_gal

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 801
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24035 on: October 25, 2013, 07:16:26 AM »
Some of the parents of the Year 7 (12-year-old) students, who had just moved up from primary school, couldn't understand why their child couldn't be in the concert if they couldn't be at the rehearsal that day.

We had something similar in a community theather production. It was the first musical being put on by a new community theather organization, and a (high school aged) girl had been cast in our production of Fiddler on the Roof. But she was also in another theater production at the time, and since ours was not as high-level as the other production, she spent most of her time at the other production's rehearsals. Well, that should be an issue that she would work out between the directors - many times people would be in multiple productions because the performance dates didn't overlap. The only problem is that she auditioned for and got a small solo in "The Rumor". And since that is the hardest piece to pull off in the musical, they were doing extra rehearsals of it (a lot of community theater productions skip it because it's hard and it's not in the movie, so not recognizable if you drop it.)

So when she continued to only show up for the occasional rehearsal, they grabbed me and had me understudy the part. She was warned that if she missed rehearsals during the last week, she would lose the part. She came on Monday, then skipped Tuesday, then showed up briefly on Wednesday, then totally blew off the invited dress rehearsal on Thursday. I then sang "her" part, uncredited. She threw a fit when she showed up for opening night that she wasn't going to get to do it.

Winterlight

  • On the internet, no one can tell you're a dog- arf.
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 10419
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24036 on: October 25, 2013, 08:23:24 AM »
I know obviously the little girl didn't mean badly - it's hard to follow choreography at the age of 3. But I just feel, maybe if the dance teacher knew that particular girl had trouble following the routine, they could have placed her at the end? Then she wouldn't have confused the other little girl who was on the end, who really was trying her best to follow the others.
True, the girl who didn't follow the routine was pretty cute, and was most likely enjoying herself. But I just spent the video feeling so sorry for the little girl on the end. I'm not saying the other girl should stop dancing (especially if she enjoys it), but maybe find a class/method/form of dance where she isn't distracting someone else, or almost bumping into them?

Yeah, she might have been having fun but the girl next to her was looking pretty distressed at times. Her fun should not involve upsetting her classmates.
If wisdom’s ways you wisely seek,
Five things observe with care,
To whom you speak,
Of whom you speak,
And how, and when, and where.
Caroline Lake Ingalls

Twik

  • A Pillar of the Forum
  • *****
  • Posts: 29158
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24037 on: October 25, 2013, 08:32:49 AM »
I know obviously the little girl didn't mean badly - it's hard to follow choreography at the age of 3. But I just feel, maybe if the dance teacher knew that particular girl had trouble following the routine, they could have placed her at the end? Then she wouldn't have confused the other little girl who was on the end, who really was trying her best to follow the others.
True, the girl who didn't follow the routine was pretty cute, and was most likely enjoying herself. But I just spent the video feeling so sorry for the little girl on the end. I'm not saying the other girl should stop dancing (especially if she enjoys it), but maybe find a class/method/form of dance where she isn't distracting someone else, or almost bumping into them?

Yeah, she might have been having fun but the girl next to her was looking pretty distressed at times. Her fun should not involve upsetting her classmates.

She's three. Putting herself in other's shoes is a skill that would be extremely rudimentary at that stage.

The point of having 3 year olds do a recital is for them to be goofy and awkward and cute.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

PastryGoddess

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6181
    • My Image Portfolio and Store
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24038 on: October 25, 2013, 08:36:15 AM »
I know obviously the little girl didn't mean badly - it's hard to follow choreography at the age of 3. But I just feel, maybe if the dance teacher knew that particular girl had trouble following the routine, they could have placed her at the end? Then she wouldn't have confused the other little girl who was on the end, who really was trying her best to follow the others.
True, the girl who didn't follow the routine was pretty cute, and was most likely enjoying herself. But I just spent the video feeling so sorry for the little girl on the end. I'm not saying the other girl should stop dancing (especially if she enjoys it), but maybe find a class/method/form of dance where she isn't distracting someone else, or almost bumping into them?

Yeah, she might have been having fun but the girl next to her was looking pretty distressed at times. Her fun should not involve upsetting her classmates.

Which girl?  Because the two girls she was between were doing just fine following the choreography as best as they could.  There is no way to know that any of the kids were upset with her for dancing that way up on stage.

Again, the kids are 3 and up on a stage probably for the first time in their lives. 
Maryland

MissRose

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3078
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24039 on: October 25, 2013, 09:11:18 AM »
The teacher I had for choir taught at both the middle and high schools.  For us to get grade/credit for performances and concerts (middle school was 2 in a school year, high school we had 4 in a school year), we had to be there for the dress rehearsal and the concert itself.  Exceptions were made only for extenuating circumstances.  The teacher ensured we knew about it and enforced the rule.  Everyone showed up for both dress rehearsal and performance as it was an easy A to get for being present & trying your best.  The other class grades were for in class participation and learning to read music among other things.

Hmmmmm

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 7566
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24040 on: October 25, 2013, 09:13:32 AM »
I know obviously the little girl didn't mean badly - it's hard to follow choreography at the age of 3. But I just feel, maybe if the dance teacher knew that particular girl had trouble following the routine, they could have placed her at the end? Then she wouldn't have confused the other little girl who was on the end, who really was trying her best to follow the others.
True, the girl who didn't follow the routine was pretty cute, and was most likely enjoying herself. But I just spent the video feeling so sorry for the little girl on the end. I'm not saying the other girl should stop dancing (especially if she enjoys it), but maybe find a class/method/form of dance where she isn't distracting someone else, or almost bumping into them?

Yeah, she might have been having fun but the girl next to her was looking pretty distressed at times. Her fun should not involve upsetting her classmates.

She's three. Putting herself in other's shoes is a skill that would be extremely rudimentary at that stage.

The point of having 3 year olds do a recital is for them to be goofy and awkward and cute.

I think that depends on the 3 yr old. In my DD's 3 yr old dance class she had 4 other students.  One was the natural performer and star always trying to be the loudest and get the most attention, 2 were there having a good time, and then there was my DD and her best friend who were already focused on "getting it right". But my DD was also very shy so though she did fine in class, we, the teacher, and the other parents were convinced she was probably not going to even make it onto stage.

What actually happened is the "star girl" walked out on stage and sat down and cried, the 2 that were having a good time did ok. But my DD and her friend concentrated so hard on following the teacher and doing the performance perfectly we are not sure they even realized there was an audience in front of them. And if a girl had started waving her hands in front of my DD's face while she was trying to do a perfect job, I'm concerned my DD may have punched her. It would have been horribly distracting to her.  I'm fine with kid's having a good time but getting into the other girls personal space wasn't fair to her.

Virg

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5901
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24041 on: October 25, 2013, 09:29:07 AM »
Hmmmmm wrote:

"I'm fine with kid's having a good time but getting into the other girls personal space wasn't fair to her."

I agree that it's not fair, but I have to agree with Twik on this one.  Putting a group of three-year-olds on a stage and expecting anything more than the tiniest bit of order is a plan for failure, and if your child is going to participate in such an event you really have to expect that it's not going to go according to plan.  If every child who distracted another child during such a performance was to be moved to another class or method, your recital will quickly degenerate to a series of individual performances.  I definitely agree that her instructor should ask her to be more careful and not try to distract the other participants, but I do find myself wondering why this particular video made it into the "Special Snowflakes" thread when the girl was just acting like a typical three-year-old child.

Virg

Twik

  • A Pillar of the Forum
  • *****
  • Posts: 29158
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24042 on: October 25, 2013, 09:36:36 AM »
And if a girl had started waving her hands in front of my DD's face while she was trying to do a perfect job, I'm concerned my DD may have punched her. It would have been horribly distracting to her.  I'm fine with kid's having a good time but getting into the other girls personal space wasn't fair to her.

I'd think punching another child for getting in her way is *much* more "unfair" than invading someone's space. But they are three year olds. And three year olds are barely old enough to not be trying to eat their tap shoes, rather than perform in them. Expecting them to behave like polite adults is a set-up for major disappointment.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

Hmmmmm

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 7566
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24043 on: October 25, 2013, 10:14:35 AM »
And if a girl had started waving her hands in front of my DD's face while she was trying to do a perfect job, I'm concerned my DD may have punched her. It would have been horribly distracting to her.  I'm fine with kid's having a good time but getting into the other girls personal space wasn't fair to her.

I'd think punching another child for getting in her way is *much* more "unfair" than invading someone's space. But they are three year olds. And three year olds are barely old enough to not be trying to eat their tap shoes, rather than perform in them. Expecting them to behave like polite adults is a set-up for major disappointment.

OK, punch was probably the wrong word, but I do think she would have shoved her back. At 3, DD did not like hand waving in her face.

But as her parent's we saw this reaction often. DD would be concentrating on doing something, another todler would try to get her attention by waving hands in her face, tugging on her or even screaming in her face. When DD would react by pushing them away or another negative action, the encroaching child's parent's reaction was "oh, my child was just trying to get her to have some fun she wasn't trying to bother her." It was hard for them to understand their child's idea of "goofy" fun was not my serious child's idea of fun at all.  But society loves the clown so DD was perceived as the mean one.

Twik

  • A Pillar of the Forum
  • *****
  • Posts: 29158
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24044 on: October 25, 2013, 10:23:00 AM »
She's not "mean," but the other children are not being rude. They're at a stage where they're just learning the difference between "Me" and "Rest of the World". So, thinking "I wouldn't like it if someone did this to me, so I shouldn't do it to them," is often a very advanced concept to compete with the thought "I WANNA DO THIS!"
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."