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Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 6389391 times)

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purplerainbow

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24450 on: November 21, 2013, 02:31:27 PM »
Encountered a SS in the supermarket today.
The store is on my way home from work, so I popped in to get a few things - and I really mean a few. I tend to use the self-checkout machines if I'm not buying much, so I did.
So, I scanned my items, paid my money, waited a second for my change so I could put it in my purse. Fine... but I'd barely picked up my change, when some woman with a full basket (I didn't stop to look properly, I was so shocked) put her basket on the side of my scanner and stood right next to me while I was picking up the last few coins. I hadn't even picked up/bagged my THREE items yet. (2 tubs of goodies from the bakery section and a chocolate bar.)
Then she stood there, chatting away to her child (I think. She may have been on the phone), waiting  - impatiently, I felt - for me to finish and go.
I shoved my purchases into my bag as quickly as I could and moved away, but I was not happy. I mean, how completely rude/SS/self-absorbed do you have to be to do that?!  :o Once outside, I got really annoyed that I didn't use my spine and say anything, or even shoot her a filthy look, but at the time I was just so shocked that she'd actually done it, that I was speechless (and uncomfortable that she was standing so unnecessarily close to me).
I mean, I wasn't being slow - my change had literally just dropped down into the tray. The machine had not by a long shot got to the point of saying "Thank you for shopping at..." which is the usual cue that the self-checkout is now free. I know her basket was full, but could she not have held it for, ooh, 90 seconds longer?

Grrr.

siamesecat2965

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24451 on: November 21, 2013, 02:52:03 PM »
Woman in front of me at the grocery store last night. She's being checked out, and this one sell alcohol. But...if the cashier is underage, which this one was, they need to call a manager or someone who CAN ring up their bottle of wine, or whatever.

SS first is huffing and puffing after cashier politely explains she cannot ring it up as she is underage. Cashier tried to get a couple people over, and finally did. Mind you, this took MAYBE 3 minutes tops. SS finishes huffing and asks how she can avoid this in the future, so she doesn't have to wait. Cashier said red nametags are underage. THen SS said well, they really should have dedicated lines for alcohol purchases, but honeslty, I've shopped in other locations, and it takes very littel time to get someone to come ring it out. 

Then she asked for cash back, in specific denominations, and then told the cashiwer she didnt' get all her $$ back. Cashier politely said yes, SS said no, cashier begins to call for a manager. SS then says "oh, here it is, i found it, i put it somewhere in my purse" No apology or anything else. Just very rude and entitled.

mime

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24452 on: November 21, 2013, 05:17:13 PM »
Encountered a SS in the supermarket today.
The store is on my way home from work, so I popped in to get a few things - and I really mean a few. I tend to use the self-checkout machines if I'm not buying much, so I did.
So, I scanned my items, paid my money, waited a second for my change so I could put it in my purse. Fine... but I'd barely picked up my change, when some woman with a full basket (I didn't stop to look properly, I was so shocked) put her basket on the side of my scanner and stood right next to me while I was picking up the last few coins. I hadn't even picked up/bagged my THREE items yet. (2 tubs of goodies from the bakery section and a chocolate bar.)
Then she stood there, chatting away to her child (I think. She may have been on the phone), waiting  - impatiently, I felt - for me to finish and go.
I shoved my purchases into my bag as quickly as I could and moved away, but I was not happy. I mean, how completely rude/SS/self-absorbed do you have to be to do that?!  :o Once outside, I got really annoyed that I didn't use my spine and say anything, or even shoot her a filthy look, but at the time I was just so shocked that she'd actually done it, that I was speechless (and uncomfortable that she was standing so unnecessarily close to me).
I mean, I wasn't being slow - my change had literally just dropped down into the tray. The machine had not by a long shot got to the point of saying "Thank you for shopping at..." which is the usual cue that the self-checkout is now free. I know her basket was full, but could she not have held it for, ooh, 90 seconds longer?

Grrr.

So many times I am just so shocked by a situation that I don't react how I know I should. I then spend the next several minutes fuming and replaying the incident in my head wishing I had done a better job. I feel for you!

doodlemor

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24453 on: November 21, 2013, 08:29:03 PM »
 

Then she asked for cash back, in specific denominations, and then told the cashiwer she didnt' get all her $$ back. Cashier politely said yes, SS said no, cashier begins to call for a manager. SS then says "oh, here it is, i found it, i put it somewhere in my purse" No apology or anything else. Just very rude and entitled.

I think that the SS was trying to scam the cashier, and knew that her monkey business wouldn't stand up to manager scrutiny.

Last month I was directly behind a woman in Wegman's who was apparently trying to shoplift 3 small items of produce.  She looked like a regular shopper, and she wasn't dressed poorly.  The woman chatted nicely with the young checker as she was being checked out.  When most everything was rung up the young checker looked in her shopping cart and said, "What's that?"  The woman hemmed and hawed, and said that she didn't know.  I could see 3 smallish fruits in there about the size of kumquats, but they weren't kumquats. The woman had not put the little things into a produce bag, like is normally done for purchases - they were just loose in the cart like can happen with stray leaves of cabbage.   Finally the checker said, "How much do they cost?"  The woman scowled and sighed and said, "Three for $2," and the checker added them to the bill. 

I could be wrong, but I think that the woman wanted the things for a special recipe and just didn't want to pay $2 for them.  She was deceptive when she claimed that she didn't know how the little fruits got into her cart, but knew exactly how much the obscure items cost.

Virg

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24454 on: November 21, 2013, 08:41:42 PM »
siamesecat2965 wrote:

"SS first is huffing and puffing after cashier politely explains she cannot ring it up as she is underage. Cashier tried to get a couple people over, and finally did. Mind you, this took MAYBE 3 minutes tops. SS finishes huffing and asks how she can avoid this in the future, so she doesn't have to wait. Cashier said red nametags are underage. THen SS said well, they really should have dedicated lines for alcohol purchases, but honeslty, I've shopped in other locations, and it takes very littel time to get someone to come ring it out."

I can get behind rude and impatient, but I don't see SS behaviour in this.  If the store has situations where a normal purchase requires someone other than the cashier to complete, then it shouldn't take three minutes to get it done.  She then asked how to avoid the problem in the future, and made a reasonable suggestion for how the problem could be dealt with.  The huffing and puffing may be rude, but being irritated at a delay isn't SS.

Virg

PeterM

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24455 on: November 21, 2013, 10:55:22 PM »
I can get behind rude and impatient, but I don't see SS behaviour in this.  If the store has situations where a normal purchase requires someone other than the cashier to complete, then it shouldn't take three minutes to get it done.  She then asked how to avoid the problem in the future, and made a reasonable suggestion for how the problem could be dealt with.  The huffing and puffing may be rude, but being irritated at a delay isn't SS.

Virg

I don't think she had to wait overly long for her purchase. I definitely don't think a cashier lane devoted solely to alcohol at a grocery store is a reasonable suggestion, especially since they already have an easy way to tell if you're going to have to wait longer with your alcohol. Add in the attempt to scam the cashier, and I think you're being overly charitable.

Pen^2

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24456 on: November 21, 2013, 11:19:04 PM »
I had a parent yesterday who was very special.

I'd been teaching his son in reading about silent e, and how it makes vowels say their name rather than their short sound (e.g. hop vs hope, sit vs site, etc.) which is useful, since there are literally hundreds of such words in English, including a lot of very common ones. I had a big list and the son would read each word and I'd tick it off. Easy-peasy, right? Well, apparently not. The father came to see me after class yesterday and demanded an apology (!) for teaching his son a dirty word. I was gobsmacked--I don't swear even at home, out of habit from working with kids so much. The word was apparently on the silent e list. I had gone through it carefully and removed rude or unpleasant words, so this surprised me. Then he showed me the word. This adult man refused to say it. He just pointed at it as though that should explain everything.

The dirty word? "nude"

In his household, apparently, nudity is not discussed and does not happen. I'm not sure how this works, but he was adamant that that's how they do it. I tried as diplomatically as I could to point out that the son is likely to see the word in books, at school, and on television, so if anything, it's better for him to recogninse it so he knows what to avoid. I didn't want to go down the terrible path of criticising his parenting decisions, especially when they're hilariously stupid, and I'm all about teaching kids about dangers and bad stuff so they can avoid it rather than just pretending it doesn't exist so they don't know how to cope when something does go wrong, but this guy wasn't having any of it. In the end, all I could do was assure him that I wouldn't have his son read the word again (he wasn't going to anyway, since it was already ticked off, and it's uncommon enough to not be on any other worksheets).

I didn't apologise since I so obviously did nothing wrong, but moved the discussion so that this guy didn't notice.

I can't help but wonder how they bathe. But there's a star next to the kid's name, now. If there's another situation like this (e.g. if the parent gets upset because we use the word "toilet" in class when asking to use the toilet), then the son will be let go. Unfortunate, yes, and not fair on the boy. But parents like these pretty much always get worse, and in the end become a huge disability for their children by demanding ridiculous and often impossible things of their teacher. It's not fair on all the other children to not learn anything just because one boy's father doesn't want him to learn.

Ugh. I tell you, 90% of the stress from work is because of idiots like these. Thankfully, most parents are lovely. But the few who aren't are very special indeed.

CuriousParty

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24457 on: November 21, 2013, 11:58:34 PM »
I had a parent yesterday who was very special.

I'd been teaching his son in reading about silent e, and how it makes vowels say their name rather than their short sound (e.g. hop vs hope, sit vs site, etc.) which is useful, since there are literally hundreds of such words in English, including a lot of very common ones. I had a big list and the son would read each word and I'd tick it off. Easy-peasy, right? Well, apparently not. The father came to see me after class yesterday and demanded an apology (!) for teaching his son a dirty word. I was gobsmacked--I don't swear even at home, out of habit from working with kids so much. The word was apparently on the silent e list. I had gone through it carefully and removed rude or unpleasant words, so this surprised me. Then he showed me the word. This adult man refused to say it. He just pointed at it as though that should explain everything.

The dirty word? "nude"

In his household, apparently, nudity is not discussed and does not happen. I'm not sure how this works, but he was adamant that that's how they do it. I tried as diplomatically as I could to point out that the son is likely to see the word in books, at school, and on television, so if anything, it's better for him to recogninse it so he knows what to avoid. I didn't want to go down the terrible path of criticising his parenting decisions, especially when they're hilariously stupid, and I'm all about teaching kids about dangers and bad stuff so they can avoid it rather than just pretending it doesn't exist so they don't know how to cope when something does go wrong, but this guy wasn't having any of it. In the end, all I could do was assure him that I wouldn't have his son read the word again (he wasn't going to anyway, since it was already ticked off, and it's uncommon enough to not be on any other worksheets).

I didn't apologise since I so obviously did nothing wrong, but moved the discussion so that this guy didn't notice.

I can't help but wonder how they bathe. But there's a star next to the kid's name, now. If there's another situation like this (e.g. if the parent gets upset because we use the word "toilet" in class when asking to use the toilet), then the son will be let go. Unfortunate, yes, and not fair on the boy. But parents like these pretty much always get worse, and in the end become a huge disability for their children by demanding ridiculous and often impossible things of their teacher. It's not fair on all the other children to not learn anything just because one boy's father doesn't want him to learn.

Ugh. I tell you, 90% of the stress from work is because of idiots like these. Thankfully, most parents are lovely. But the few who aren't are very special indeed.

Or, you know, become pregnant....or deliver...or...or...

Pen^2

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24458 on: November 22, 2013, 12:18:37 AM »

<snip>

I can't help but wonder how they bathe.

<snippety>

Or, you know, become pregnant....or deliver...or...or...

I always wondered about how the boy in this Fry and Laurie sketch existed, also: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xmb1DT62FVc

Virg

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24459 on: November 22, 2013, 02:48:03 AM »
PeterM wrote:

"I don't think she had to wait overly long for her purchase."

If you take the post at face value, she had to wait three minutes while the cashier tried and failed to corral a coworker to handle it.  That's a long time for a transaction that should take less than a minute to begin with.

"I definitely don't think a cashier lane devoted solely to alcohol at a grocery store is a reasonable suggestion, especially since they already have an easy way to tell if you're going to have to wait longer with your alcohol."

My take on that request is not a lane that rings up alcohol exclusively, but telling customers that they should always go to lane 5 if they're buying alcohol.  Many stores already do this with tobacco products, and that way they could always put a cashier in that lane who can sell alcohol.

"Add in the attempt to scam the cashier, and I think you're being overly charitable."

Rude isn't always SS.  Impatient isn't always SS.  Scamming isn't always SS.  That's my point.  This story fits several threads on this board, but I don't think it's a good fit for this one because the core of it revolves around the store dropping the ball so her complaint was legitimate.

Virg

poundcake

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24460 on: November 22, 2013, 05:32:23 AM »
Quote
I didn't want to go down the terrible path of criticising his parenting decisions, especially when they're hilariously stupid,

I do.

I really wish, on behalf of my fellow educators and teachers, that we could have a "my class, my rules" dynamic again. If you don't want your children to read ___ or hear ___ or think about ___? Homeschool them. The idea that the rest of the world has to conform to your nutty beliefs is the epitome of SSness.

Pen^2

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24461 on: November 22, 2013, 06:47:54 AM »
Quote
I didn't want to go down the terrible path of criticising his parenting decisions, especially when they're hilariously stupid,

I do.

I really wish, on behalf of my fellow educators and teachers, that we could have a "my class, my rules" dynamic again. If you don't want your children to read ___ or hear ___ or think about ___? Homeschool them. The idea that the rest of the world has to conform to your nutty beliefs is the epitome of SSness.

Is it kind of sad that I actually dream about this? Every older coworker (teacher by occupation) I've had has complained that as we've moved away from that kind of culture, entitlement has soared while discipline and respect have plummeted. But it's probably a correlation thing, not causation. At any rate, it's both the kids and the teachers who are worse off here.

Mal

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24462 on: November 22, 2013, 07:14:45 AM »
The train I ride to work each day is always very crowded, no matter if I get on at 6 AM or 9 AM. Standing for the full duration of the ride is the usual MO and it's all anyone can do to try not to stand in anyone's way or inadvertently hit them.

I was positioned by the door, which, at times when the train isn't crowded, is wide enough to let two grown people enter or exit at once. I tried to tuck myself into the corner between the door and the seats but that wasn't enough for one elderly gentleman with a walker who was standing behind another person when the double doors opened at one stop.

He was determined to enter simultaneously with the person in front of him and thus veered his walker to the right where I was standing, rolling it over my foot first, then shoving the metal frame into my shin with full force, all the while grunting angrily. I was so surprised that all I managed to utter was a a whimper; I had people and obstacles to both sides and behind me so there was no way for me to yield or dodge.

Had he waited for the person in front of him to enter, he would have been able to get on the train without having to assault anybody.

Needless to say, I was a tiny bit miffed when he was offered a seat right away while I was rubbing my bruised shin.

Carotte

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24463 on: November 22, 2013, 07:20:23 AM »
Quote
I didn't want to go down the terrible path of criticising his parenting decisions, especially when they're hilariously stupid,

I do.

I really wish, on behalf of my fellow educators and teachers, that we could have a "my class, my rules" dynamic again. If you don't want your children to read ___ or hear ___ or think about ___? Homeschool them. The idea that the rest of the world has to conform to your nutty beliefs is the epitome of SSness.

The problem with that is that while the OP has a very normal curriculum who simply includes the very normal and acceptable word Nude (which is only bothering say 1% of the population), you might get teachers with weird preferences or believes that 99% of the population would frown upon.
How do you define who's nutty?
I guess you can only go by the established state/country/national curriculum to decide if you want or need to homeschool your kids.
If you're against the curriculum, homeschool, if you're OK with the curriculum but the teacher is going off base, you do have a right to complain.

Now, I'm sure Poundcake was only talking about the normal teachers that yeah, should have the right to say "My class (my imposed curriculum the state said I had to follow)/ my rules (that I need to do my job)", but I've heard and seen a few 'horror' stories and thought "hey, can he actually say/teach that? shouldn't we tell the administration on him?".

o_gal

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24464 on: November 22, 2013, 07:58:39 AM »
 

Then she asked for cash back, in specific denominations, and then told the cashiwer she didnt' get all her $$ back. Cashier politely said yes, SS said no, cashier begins to call for a manager. SS then says "oh, here it is, i found it, i put it somewhere in my purse" No apology or anything else. Just very rude and entitled.

I think that the SS was trying to scam the cashier, and knew that her monkey business wouldn't stand up to manager scrutiny.

Last month I was directly behind a woman in Wegman's who was apparently trying to shoplift 3 small items of produce.  She looked like a regular shopper, and she wasn't dressed poorly.  The woman chatted nicely with the young checker as she was being checked out.  When most everything was rung up the young checker looked in her shopping cart and said, "What's that?"  The woman hemmed and hawed, and said that she didn't know.  I could see 3 smallish fruits in there about the size of kumquats, but they weren't kumquats. The woman had not put the little things into a produce bag, like is normally done for purchases - they were just loose in the cart like can happen with stray leaves of cabbage.   Finally the checker said, "How much do they cost?"  The woman scowled and sighed and said, "Three for $2," and the checker added them to the bill. 

I could be wrong, but I think that the woman wanted the things for a special recipe and just didn't want to pay $2 for them.  She was deceptive when she claimed that she didn't know how the little fruits got into her cart, but knew exactly how much the obscure items cost.

I had an incident similar to this a few weeks ago, and I really hope that I was misinterpreting the situation, but the cashier told me that they get lots of people trying to steal things by using the self-checkouts.

I was waiting for 2 women in front of me at the large self-checkout - the kind where you can do a whole cartload of groceries. The first woman was checking out with multiple boxes of shoes. The second woman also had some shoe boxes in the bottom of  her cart, and at one point I thought I saw them talking to each other, so I thought they were together. First woman finishes and picks up her stuff - she goes off to the side to rearrange bags, further making me think that they're together and first woman is waiting for second woman.

Second woman starts checking out her stuff, and keeps running into snags where the items won't scan easily. She keeps apologizing to me about how long she's taking. At one point, where the shoe boxes are still in the bottom of her cart, and she's only scanned 2 of the 5 or 6 packs of 8 bottled sodas/pop, she starts to pay. She has multiple change purses from which she's taking out cash. I thought she was doing multiple transactions, like she's buying stuff for someone else. Nope, she continues apologizing to me (distracting me?) about how long it's taking. Then she bags up what she has scanned, and leaves.

She never scanned the 2 (at least) shoe boxes at the bottom of her cart. She hasn't scanned all of the soda/pop packs in the cart. She just bagged up and left. First woman has also left. So when I was scanning and getting through all my stuff, I called the cashier over and explained. 1 or 2 cashiers oversee the 10 self-checkouts, and she says that she sees people do this all.the.time. I gave her a description of the woman and the fact that she was the immediate transaction at this register before me. But since she was paying cash, they have no record of who she might be. The most they could do is pull security tapes of the checkout line, and if she really was stealing, then try to pull tapes in the parking lot to get a license plate number if she drove there. But it's a long shot and as I said, I'm really hoping I misinterpreted the situation. But I don't think I did  :(