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Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 6247993 times)

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Hmmmmm

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24480 on: November 22, 2013, 04:50:55 PM »
When I worked retail for one year, I ended up needing abdominal surgery the day before Thanksgiving. It was scheduled before the work schedule was out for that week, and as I wasn't going to be in to work the next few days, I called the manager. I told him I needed Black Friday off, and before I could even explain why, he interrupted me with, "Sorry, we just went over this in the meetings the past few days, nobody is getting that day off. If you need a specific shift talk with someone to switch once the schedule comes out. Nobody's getting that day off." I had to wait a full minute while he explained that everyone had to be there. When he finally finished I said, "Well, that's nice, but I think recovering from surgery would count as a good reason to miss work. I'll be two days out of surgery at that point, and the doctor said I'm likely to need a week. Sorry, I won't make it."

Everyone at work was giving me dirty looks when the schedule came out and I wasn't on it for the day before Thanksgiving, Black Friday, or that entire weekend. I had to go and explain to all of them that I wasn't just making it hard for them, I was honestly having surgery. Some of them still didn't believe me until I came back to work with the scars to prove it!

This reminded me of a friend of mine who normally wasn't a SS but in this instance was.

My sister was a manager of a large retail department store and they often hired seasonal staff. My friend needed some additional income and my sister hired her for the season starting in mid October. All seasonal staff were hired with the knowledge they'd need to work black Friday, all weekends, Christmas Eve, the day after Christmas, New Years Eve, New Years Day, and Jan 3rd of that year because that was when the store closed early and they did year end inventory.

Friend first came and asked Sis if she could have Black Friday off because her full time job had offered to let her have Wed before Tday off and she decided she'd like to go home for the holiday. Sis told her no but she'd schedule her for the late shift so that she could work from 1 to 9pm and could drive in that morning. Friend wasn't thrilled but didn't complain too much.

Next friend asked if she could have a Saturday off to attend her company party. Sis offered to reschedule her for a morning shift so she could attend but friend declined because she said she'd be too tired after working a full Saturday to go anyway.

Then friend asked if she could have a half morning Xmas Eve shift so she could leave early by 1pm. Sis said no, that all seasonal employees were required to work till closing on Xmas Eve but that the store would be closing by 4pm. Friend got really pouty. Sis got very ticked.

Friend works on NYE but calls in sick on NY's Day and again on inventory day. Sis is really, really ticked now but the season is over and she just leaves it alone because this was a friend of mine and she knew she'd be around her in social situations. Sis didn't tell me about the issues until the next year.

Why does Sis tell me about the issues the next year. Because friend calls sis up the next October and asks if she can come back as a seasonal employee. This was Sis. :o >:( ::)

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24481 on: November 22, 2013, 04:59:57 PM »
People think they can work during the holiday season and have holidays off?

GlitterIsMyDrug

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24482 on: November 22, 2013, 05:12:56 PM »
And of course, insulting the person you are asking a favor of always works so well. I am sure that if you didn't have parents and grandparents to see, you would be willing to do backflips in order to accomodate her request, right?

Why yes of course! The best way to get me to do a favor is to insult me while asking me to do it!

I think she saw I'd swap around a lot with other people and figured I'd just do this for her. She might have thought I was a push over (I'd ran into this with a prior co-worker), she was very surprised that in fact I did favors for people who were nice and did favors in return for me. I actually have a lovely spine, and I have no issue saying no to people.

When I had trained her (I'd been there awhile and the boss often had me help train people) she kept telling me she knew how to do all of this she had finished college after all and was going to be a teacher. Ok, great. I didn't get why she kept telling me she had finished college (I mean good for you, but it's not like you cured cancer), until someone pointed out to me she'd heard I was still in college and we were the same age (I was in grad school getting my PhD). The theory was that she was trying to tell me she was smarter then me. My word, if you wanna rub my nose in how brilliant you are start by telling me you're brilliant. A lot of people finish college. I started turning around on her "Oh, you went to college, you know how this works, right?" and force her to admit that no she needed help. She really looked down on our supervisor. A wonderful woman, kind, helpful, but she'd never been college and in fact had dropped out of high school to support her family. So SS was always talking down to her, which I always thought was just stupid, this woman had worked her way up from a part-time housekeeper to second in command at the front desk, she knew everyone. She's now the general manager of the hotel. I don't know what happened to SS. I'd heard she was pregnant and going to be a stay at home mom, which seems like a good fit for her. Though I doubt her kid(s) will care she graduated from college.

artk2002

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24483 on: November 22, 2013, 05:30:11 PM »

...   

I'd been teaching his son in reading about silent e, and how it makes vowels say their name rather than their short sound (e.g. hop vs hope, sit vs site, etc.) which is useful, since there are literally hundreds of such words in English, including a lot of very common ones.

The dirty word? "nude"   ...


I loved your story, but I'm sitting here wondering what a 'nud' would be?   ;D

I take it that some words were just random words without a "no silent e" counterpart?

Of course there's the fact that for many of us, "nude" doesn't fit the silent-e-makes-vowels-say-their name "rule." I pronounce it "nood" not "newd"; (to keep it on topic) how about "rude"? Pretty much all of those "rules" are worthless in English. It would be fine if there were just a couple of exceptions but there are almost as many exceptions as examples that conform.  I may be weird, but I think i-before-e is another worthless one; who needs a "rule" that has two exceptions built in and lots of counter-examples, even to the exceptions? But perhaps I should rein in my irritation and stop being so scientific about it.
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Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24484 on: November 22, 2013, 06:02:44 PM »

...   

I'd been teaching his son in reading about silent e, and how it makes vowels say their name rather than their short sound (e.g. hop vs hope, sit vs site, etc.) which is useful, since there are literally hundreds of such words in English, including a lot of very common ones.

The dirty word? "nude"   ...


I loved your story, but I'm sitting here wondering what a 'nud' would be?   ;D

I take it that some words were just random words without a "no silent e" counterpart?

Of course there's the fact that for many of us, "nude" doesn't fit the silent-e-makes-vowels-say-their name "rule." I pronounce it "nood" not "newd"; (to keep it on topic) how about "rude"? Pretty much all of those "rules" are worthless in English. It would be fine if there were just a couple of exceptions but there are almost as many exceptions as examples that conform.  I may be weird, but I think i-before-e is another worthless one; who needs a "rule" that has two exceptions built in and lots of counter-examples, even to the exceptions? But perhaps I should rein in my irritation and stop being so scientific about it.

So that it rhymes with (for example) "wood" and not "food"?  That's a new one for me, seriously!
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Slartibartfast

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24485 on: November 22, 2013, 06:16:39 PM »

So that it rhymes with (for example) "wood" and not "food"?  That's a new one for me, seriously!

I think it's more the difference between "food" and "ewwwww!"

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24486 on: November 22, 2013, 06:23:48 PM »

So that it rhymes with (for example) "wood" and not "food"?  That's a new one for me, seriously!

I think it's more the difference between "food" and "ewwwww!"

Ahhh.  THAT makes a lot more sense, yes.
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Pen^2

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24487 on: November 22, 2013, 06:32:54 PM »

...   

I'd been teaching his son in reading about silent e, and how it makes vowels say their name rather than their short sound (e.g. hop vs hope, sit vs site, etc.) which is useful, since there are literally hundreds of such words in English, including a lot of very common ones.

The dirty word? "nude"   ...


I loved your story, but I'm sitting here wondering what a 'nud' would be?   ;D

I take it that some words were just random words without a "no silent e" counterpart?

Of course there's the fact that for many of us, "nude" doesn't fit the silent-e-makes-vowels-say-their name "rule." I pronounce it "nood" not "newd"; (to keep it on topic) how about "rude"? Pretty much all of those "rules" are worthless in English. It would be fine if there were just a couple of exceptions but there are almost as many exceptions as examples that conform.  I may be weird, but I think i-before-e is another worthless one; who needs a "rule" that has two exceptions built in and lots of counter-examples, even to the exceptions? But perhaps I should rein in my irritation and stop being so scientific about it.

As someone who teaches this sort of thing, and who has observed literally hundreds of children learn and practice such rules before picking up a book and being able to read it for the first time, let me assure you that there are several extremely useful rules in English, where it's much easier to learn a single rule and a dozen exceptions than to just memorise the spelling and pronunciation of several hundred otherwise easy-to-learn words. I before e is not such a rule--it's often used as an example of English spelling rules and it's a terrible one, because the exceptions greatly outnumber the adherents. It's out of date and isn't even taught here or in Australia any more, nor has it been for decades, because it's so useless. Actual rules like whether or not a c is soft (basically always unless it's followed by an e, i, or y) are tremendously useful, and their exceptions are terribly few and often not words a child would even know. Silent k and g is another rule we teach: if a word starts with kn/gn, then the k/g is silent. The exceptions are incredibly few, and aren't words that even the majority of adults would know.

Here, "nude" is pronounced "nyood", if that helps. And I didn't go into detail because I felt it wasn't relevant to my original post, but the magic e and u actually has two options: u can either say "yoo" or just "oo" depending on the word. There is a reason for this which is technical and irrelevant here. But of the two options, only ever one is an actual word, and the other is gibberish, so you always know what to go with. I have lists of all English words (found in the dictionary, anyway) for each rule (typically hundreds or thousands depending on the rule) and all their exceptions (often a few dozen at most). So let me please assure you that there are not "almost as many exceptions as examples that conform" at all.

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24488 on: November 22, 2013, 06:42:51 PM »
To quote comedian Brian Regan:

"I before E except after C
And when sounding like A as in neighbor and weigh
And on weekends and holidays and all throughout May
And you'll never be right no matter what you say!"
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Iris

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24489 on: November 22, 2013, 06:43:09 PM »

...   

I'd been teaching his son in reading about silent e, and how it makes vowels say their name rather than their short sound (e.g. hop vs hope, sit vs site, etc.) which is useful, since there are literally hundreds of such words in English, including a lot of very common ones.

The dirty word? "nude"   ...


I loved your story, but I'm sitting here wondering what a 'nud' would be?   ;D

I take it that some words were just random words without a "no silent e" counterpart?

Of course there's the fact that for many of us, "nude" doesn't fit the silent-e-makes-vowels-say-their name "rule." I pronounce it "nood" not "newd"; (to keep it on topic) how about "rude"? Pretty much all of those "rules" are worthless in English. It would be fine if there were just a couple of exceptions but there are almost as many exceptions as examples that conform.  I may be weird, but I think i-before-e is another worthless one; who needs a "rule" that has two exceptions built in and lots of counter-examples, even to the exceptions? But perhaps I should rein in my irritation and stop being so scientific about it.

As someone who teaches this sort of thing, and who has observed literally hundreds of children learn and practice such rules before picking up a book and being able to read it for the first time, let me assure you that there are several extremely useful rules in English, where it's much easier to learn a single rule and a dozen exceptions than to just memorise the spelling and pronunciation of several hundred otherwise easy-to-learn words. I before e is not such a rule--it's often used as an example of English spelling rules and it's a terrible one, because the exceptions greatly outnumber the adherents. It's out of date and isn't even taught here or in Australia any more, nor has it been for decades, because it's so useless. Actual rules like whether or not a c is soft (basically always unless it's followed by an e, i, or y) are tremendously useful, and their exceptions are terribly few and often not words a child would even know. Silent k and g is another rule we teach: if a word starts with kn/gn, then the k/g is silent. The exceptions are incredibly few, and aren't words that even the majority of adults would know.

Here, "nude" is pronounced "nyood", if that helps. And I didn't go into detail because I felt it wasn't relevant to my original post, but the magic e and u actually has two options: u can either say "yoo" or just "oo" depending on the word. There is a reason for this which is technical and irrelevant here. But of the two options, only ever one is an actual word, and the other is gibberish, so you always know what to go with. I have lists of all English words (found in the dictionary, anyway) for each rule (typically hundreds or thousands depending on the rule) and all their exceptions (often a few dozen at most). So let me please assure you that there are not "almost as many exceptions as examples that conform" at all.


Going off on yet another angle, I learnt "i before except after c when the sound is ee" which always worked really well for me. Am I just not noticing the exceptions because I haven't actually relied on the rule for 30+ years? I saw a long rant about the rule on QI one night but they were using words like concierge and hacienda as their counter examples and I was left vaguely staring at the tv saying "But they don't say ee! The rule isn't even ABOUT them!?" and wondering why the big fuss when they weren't even doing it right...
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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24490 on: November 22, 2013, 06:43:44 PM »
Ah yes, "I before E except after C.  Or when you're running a feisty heist with your weird beige foreign neighbours called Keith and Sheila".

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24491 on: November 22, 2013, 06:51:40 PM »
Ah yes, "I before E except after C.  Or when you're running a feisty heist with your weird beige foreign neighbours called Keith and Sheila".

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Pen^2

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24492 on: November 22, 2013, 06:56:07 PM »
Going off on yet another angle, I learnt "i before except after c when the sound is ee" which always worked really well for me. Am I just not noticing the exceptions because I haven't actually relied on the rule for 30+ years? I saw a long rant about the rule on QI one night but they were using words like concierge and hacienda as their counter examples and I was left vaguely staring at the tv saying "But they don't say ee! The rule isn't even ABOUT them!?" and wondering why the big fuss when they weren't even doing it right...

That rule actually is okay, but the one much more commonly taught is just, "I before e except after c. No matter what. End of story." On its own, and without reference to the "ee" sound, this 'rule' is pretty worthless. It's incorrect much more often than not. On QI they were talking about this more common 'rule' rather than the version that actually works but is, unfortunately, largely unknown and not taught.

siamesecat2965

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24493 on: November 22, 2013, 06:57:33 PM »


My sister was a manager of a large retail department store and they often hired seasonal staff. My friend needed some additional income and my sister hired her for the season starting in mid October. All seasonal staff were hired with the knowledge they'd need to work black Friday, all weekends, Christmas Eve, the day after Christmas, New Years Eve, New Years Day, and Jan 3rd of that year because that was when the store closed early and they did year end inventory.

 

This reminds me of a lot of our customers, who think it will be "fun" to work in their favorite store. But its not just playing with the clothes. Esp if you close. there's actual work to be done! and then there are those, who even when hired, and agree weekends are fine, then suddendly can't work weekends. And they all end up quitting with a short period of time.

I've been there 8 years, and paid my dues.Yes, I don't work sundays but I have a FT job, and work 2 nights and every Sat, and only ask for those off if I'm going away, or have something going on. But if its at night, I'll try and work during the day, and vice versa.

LadyClaire

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #24494 on: November 22, 2013, 07:15:02 PM »


My sister was a manager of a large retail department store and they often hired seasonal staff. My friend needed some additional income and my sister hired her for the season starting in mid October. All seasonal staff were hired with the knowledge they'd need to work black Friday, all weekends, Christmas Eve, the day after Christmas, New Years Eve, New Years Day, and Jan 3rd of that year because that was when the store closed early and they did year end inventory.

 

This reminds me of a lot of our customers, who think it will be "fun" to work in their favorite store. But its not just playing with the clothes. Esp if you close. there's actual work to be done! and then there are those, who even when hired, and agree weekends are fine, then suddendly can't work weekends. And they all end up quitting with a short period of time.

I've been there 8 years, and paid my dues.Yes, I don't work sundays but I have a FT job, and work 2 nights and every Sat, and only ask for those off if I'm going away, or have something going on. But if its at night, I'll try and work during the day, and vice versa.

I worked at Macy's last year over the holidays, mostly doing recovery (which was cleaning up displays, re-folding clothes and such). There were so many people on the recovery team who would just find a secluded corner of the store and just hang out there talking, not actually working. It would irritate the crud out of me because that meant more work for the rest of us.