Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5291049 times)

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ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25320 on: February 03, 2014, 11:06:08 AM »
Georgia Aquarium is the same way. Many exhibits don't allow strollers and people sneak them in anyway. They then get upset that the walkways are not wide enough for gigantic strollers plus people.

Nikko-chan

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25321 on: February 03, 2014, 11:54:32 AM »
Yesterday, my region held its annual Free Museum Day. Just about every museum in the area was either free or half-price. The history museum where I volunteer was one of them. Because the crowds are so heavy, we have volunteers all over the place doing traffic control. We don't allow strollers inside on this day, so we set up an attended place outside where you can check your stroller for free. There are also some railings if you want to lock up a bike there.

My role was running a hands-on activity in front of the museum. I happened to look at the front door just as a woman walking a bicycle went right by the volunteer at the door and barged into the museum, bike and all. I got a full view of her arguing with museum staff that she couldn't leave her expensive and wonderful bike, so she absolutely positively had to take it inside the museum with her. 

I thought she had gone away, but about 5 minutes later, one of the student volunteers shyly asked me if it was OK to lock up a bike over there. Same woman. She was in the process of locking her bike to the hand rail on the disabled access ramp, effectively blocking about a third of the ramp, and, of course, blocking access to the hand rail.

She was very annoyed when I told her she absolutely could not put the bike there. She complained that her lock would not go around the fence in the stroller parking area (really? then how did those other bikes get looked up there?). She finally and huffily agreed to put her bike in the appropriate place, although she was sure I was just picking on her.

But her bike was special!!! It couldn't park by all the normal bikes. It might catch something!

This reminded me of a story about an aquarium that opened in...some town and state I don't live in and can't for the life of me remember (I wanna say Michigan, but that doesn't sound right either...). It was this huge massive aquarium that a lot of people were super excited for. So for opening weekend (and maybe the whole first week it was opened), the aquarium knew it was going to be crazy busy. So to make sure everyone could safely walk around, and see all they wanted to see, they weren't going to allow strollers for just opening week (or weekend). Now, after that week past, strollers would be allowed. Cue the SS parents coming out in droves of "Aquarium doesn't want children!!!!" and "How dare you, we will never come!!" ect, ect. I couldn't help but think, I'm sure the aquarium staff is quite please you and your probably entitled children won't darken their doorway.

I believe that was Cleveland, OH :)

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25322 on: February 03, 2014, 07:35:15 PM »
Georgia Aquarium is the same way. Many exhibits don't allow strollers and people sneak them in anyway. They then get upset that the walkways are not wide enough for gigantic strollers plus people.

The National Aquarium in the Inner Harbor, Baltimore is the same way, I found when we went this summer. Quite possible it's always been that way and it was just my first opportunity to find that out.  It makes sense though as there are a lot of escalators and while they do have elevators, they're small and though not exclusively for the handicapped, I guess it's rather implied. 
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kckgirl

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25323 on: February 03, 2014, 07:39:47 PM »
I hated going through the National Aquarium in Baltimore with a toddler and no stroller. If I had known, we would have left the toddler at home.
Maryland

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25324 on: February 03, 2014, 07:54:32 PM »
I hated going through the National Aquarium in Baltimore with a toddler and no stroller. If I had known, we would have left the toddler at home.

It's definitely no fun. I used my moby wrap but either I didn't wrap him against me well enough or something cause it got uncomfortable for both of us and I eventually gave up and tried to lead him around by the hand but that could get to be a pain as well as I also had my purse, though at least the older boys shared the responsibility of toting the diaper bag.

I'm glad the next time we go he'll be older and easier to keep track of.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Elfmama

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25325 on: February 03, 2014, 08:24:47 PM »
Georgia Aquarium is the same way. Many exhibits don't allow strollers and people sneak them in anyway. They then get upset that the walkways are not wide enough for gigantic strollers plus people.

The National Aquarium in the Inner Harbor, Baltimore is the same way, I found when we went this summer. Quite possible it's always been that way and it was just my first opportunity to find that out.  It makes sense though as there are a lot of escalators and while they do have elevators, they're small and though not exclusively for the handicapped, I guess it's rather implied.
Not always been that way, since I remember taking one of the now-teenagers in there in a stroller when he was a toddler.   This would have been about 15 years ago, though, so plenty of time for them to change their policy.
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siamesecat2965

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25326 on: February 04, 2014, 11:38:56 AM »
Georgia Aquarium is the same way. Many exhibits don't allow strollers and people sneak them in anyway. They then get upset that the walkways are not wide enough for gigantic strollers plus people.

The National Aquarium in the Inner Harbor, Baltimore is the same way, I found when we went this summer. Quite possible it's always been that way and it was just my first opportunity to find that out.  It makes sense though as there are a lot of escalators and while they do have elevators, they're small and though not exclusively for the handicapped, I guess it's rather implied.

Yes, it has. I went to school near there in the 80's and it was no strollers back then.

nutraxfornerves

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25327 on: February 04, 2014, 11:49:49 AM »
Mr. Nutrax used a wheelchair. We found that he was often "invisible" to stroller pushers. I'm not sure what it was, perhaps only looking straight ahead for adults who might be in the way.  In crowded places like a museum or aquarium, he was often banged into. The offender would almost always apologize, saying "I'm sorry. I didn't see you," but it still was surprising that they didn't see him. There were also were toddlers pushing their own strollers, who could not really be expected to look around. A crowded museum is not the place to let a toddler drive alone.

Then there were the snowflakes who would push children in front of Mr. Nutrax at an exhibit, saying something like "my kids need to get in front so they can see." Didn't you notice that your kids are about as tall as someone in a wheelchair who also needs to get in front so he can see?

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Lorelei_Evil

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25328 on: February 04, 2014, 11:55:21 AM »
I walk with a stick and am frequently rammed by strollers and shopping carts. 

ladyknight1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25329 on: February 04, 2014, 12:05:07 PM »
I have chronic back issues and frequently use a stick, less frequently use a wheelchair. Many people have no concept of space, and will try to squeeze a cart/stroller/their body through a few inches of space instead of waiting a few seconds.

I gave up my annual pass to Walt Disney World because it is getting worse and my tolerance for being run over is limited.

melicious

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25330 on: February 04, 2014, 01:20:12 PM »
Yesterday, my region held its annual Free Museum Day. Just about every museum in the area was either free or half-price. The history museum where I volunteer was one of them. Because the crowds are so heavy, we have volunteers all over the place doing traffic control. We don't allow strollers inside on this day, so we set up an attended place outside where you can check your stroller for free. There are also some railings if you want to lock up a bike there.

My role was running a hands-on activity in front of the museum. I happened to look at the front door just as a woman walking a bicycle went right by the volunteer at the door and barged into the museum, bike and all. I got a full view of her arguing with museum staff that she couldn't leave her expensive and wonderful bike, so she absolutely positively had to take it inside the museum with her. 

I thought she had gone away, but about 5 minutes later, one of the student volunteers shyly asked me if it was OK to lock up a bike over there. Same woman. She was in the process of locking her bike to the hand rail on the disabled access ramp, effectively blocking about a third of the ramp, and, of course, blocking access to the hand rail.

She was very annoyed when I told her she absolutely could not put the bike there. She complained that her lock would not go around the fence in the stroller parking area (really? then how did those other bikes get looked up there?). She finally and huffily agreed to put her bike in the appropriate place, although she was sure I was just picking on her.

I don't get people like this: who believe their convenience trumps the safety of others. I guess as long as it doesn't affect them, they don't care. I guess that's the definitive trait of an SS: a lack of awareness that there are other people on the planet.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2014, 01:22:01 PM by melicious »

Tosca

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25331 on: February 04, 2014, 05:13:56 PM »
Yesterday I was driving along a major road at peak hour, and noticed it was even more congested than usual.  The reason why became apparent when I came upon the car stopped in the lane with its hazard lights flashing and people having to go around it.  Poor guy, what a place to break down.  The driver was talking on the phone...no worries, probably calling the breakdown service. 

But then, in my rear vision mirror, I saw the hazard lights stop flashing, and the car start driving merrily down the road like nothing had happened.

The driver had apparently blocked a lane of traffic at peak hour to take a phone call.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25332 on: February 04, 2014, 05:22:31 PM »
Then there were the snowflakes who would push children in front of Mr. Nutrax at an exhibit, saying something like "my kids need to get in front so they can see." Didn't you notice that your kids are about as tall as someone in a wheelchair who also needs to get in front so he can see?
That's stupid, if kids are that small you can hold them up.

There's an SS old lady who lives in our building. DH says an ambulance came one, and he heard them say as we were coming down the stairs to use the ambulance to call it for emergencies only.

The other day she blocked the driveway to our very small parking lot. The grounds keeping people were here and she stopped her car on the driveway and got out to talk to them, all the whole was someone directly behind her trying to get in. He had to convince her to get back into her car.

Another time I've seen her attempt to drive in while someone is coming out. There only really room for one car at a time to go in and out so her response was to drive up close and beep her horn.  ::)

Tosca

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25333 on: February 04, 2014, 05:28:52 PM »
The stories about the strollers triggered these memories...

I used to play a Bb bass in a brass band.  This is an enormous instrument, bigger than a tuba.  He (his name was Arnie, after the esteemed former governor of California) lived in a hard plastic case, with two little wheels like a suitcase.  The whole shebang was about 1.5 metres long, 70cm wide and weighed nearly 20kg.  Maneuverable he was not.

Many and vivid are the memories of trying to make my way along crowded footpaths to the band mustering point, towing Arnie.  Conversations usually went something like this...

ME; Excuse me, can I get past please?
THEM; blank stare.
ME; Excuse me please?
THEM; shuffle one step to the left when I need them to move two metres to the right.
ME; Can you move over further please?  That gap is not big enough, I'll hit you if I try to get through there.
THEM; blank stare.  Move another half step.

Repeat every couple of metres.

Inside my head I was screaming, "LOOK AT WHAT I'M TOWING, YOU MORON!  Arnie and I could crush you like a bug meeting a freight train!  I am giving you three seconds to get out of my way BEFORE I MOW YOU DOWN WHERE YOU STAND!"

Fortunately etiquette won.  But it took self control.   

Frog24

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25334 on: February 04, 2014, 05:38:09 PM »
I just remembered this one:  We took our little one to see the Santa Clause parade back in December.  In-laws, and DH found a spot where it was *only* 3 people deep.  :P  So they're standing there, and a family (several adults) wends their way through the crowd. 

The family didn't say "excuse me", just used their hands to gently move people out of the way.  The in-laws thought the family wanted to cross the street, so they moved back half a step to make room. Since we're in this thread, you know what happened.  The family stopped right in front of my family.  They just wanted to get as close to the front of the crowd as possible, and didn't even notice/care that they stopped in front of other people and blocked the view.  My in-laws were not impressed, and neither was my DH, who had to boost our little one onto his shoulders for the length of the parade just so she could see the floats.

 
« Last Edit: February 04, 2014, 06:07:25 PM by Frog24 »