Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5354666 times)

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VorFemme

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25545 on: February 14, 2014, 09:06:56 AM »
We left San Angelo in 1992, never to return to live there (knock on mesquite, live oak, or pecan wood) - VorGuy's parents and sister's family live there.  We visit.

Seriously, folks, in college in the 1970s, 1/4" (yes, that is one quarter of an inch) of snow caused accidents as people spun out of control on icy streets.
San Angelo was where I first drove on snow, about 2-3 inches, IIRC.  Same time frame.   DH, then DF, a Syracuse NY native, taught me to just let the idling of the engine pull the car along in the city, with no accelerator pedal at all.  And to brake BEFORE a turn, not as you go into it.  Keeps you from fishtailing. 

After that, 2 winters in Alaska finished the learning.

It was 1/4" of an inch when classes started....I think that it kept falling that day and we woke up on a Saturday morning with a lot more snow...

I don't remember how long it stuck around....it's been a long, long time.

Were you at ASU from 1975 to 1979?  We might have been on campus at the same time at some point....

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SCMagnolia

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25546 on: February 14, 2014, 09:52:53 AM »
Yesterday, we got hit with the western edge of that winter storm that hit the south this week.  This is on top of the snow that's already been here.  Most of the municipalities in this area have been struggling to keep their road salt supplies up -- salt is delivered by barge on the rivers, which are not completely frozen over, but have enough ice on them to make barge traffic a real pain in the backside.

The township I live in is mostly rural.   We are out of road salt here, so the township supervisors declared a state of emergency and requested that everyone stay home and off the roads today unless they need to travel to work, school (and the school district cancelled classes), or to medical appointments.    For the most part, those of us who live in the most rural parts of the township don't see any difference from when they're stocked full of salt -- our roads don't get plowed or salted until the main roads are bone-dry.  We've all learned to deal with driving on white-knuckle-gettin'-right-with-your-chosen-diety roads.

Well...  The local stations in Pittsburgh are having a FIELD DAY with this.  Every. Single. One of them has sent a news crew out to report on our salt disaster.  This would be all good and fine if they didn't all camp out in front of the friggin' Walmart, which is on a STATE highway.  The state has salt galore.  The highway they're reporting from is just wet.   So one of these dingbats says the emergency declaration is "just a precaution since the roads in the township ** cue grand motion to the highway behind her ** are just wet."   Another one felt it was necessary to point out that where the Turnpike passes through the township is all clear.  Well, hell.  It had better be!  They have their own road crew and lots of salt to throw around!!! None of these folks were anywhere NEAR a township road on their way out here to report on the situation. 

The parking lot in front of Walmart looks like an idiots' convention, much more than usual....

Meanwhile, as I'm venturing to work, I watch a UPS truck slide sideways for about 50 feet down the road in front of me.  I decided that was enough fun and games for one day, pushed the little 4WD button, and had me a nice long chat with The Man Upstairs until He got me safely to some clean road.   I'll never do a single naughty thing ever again!!!
« Last Edit: February 14, 2014, 11:20:20 AM by SCMagnolia »

MrTango

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25547 on: February 14, 2014, 11:09:37 AM »
That is a BRIDGE???   :o

Where I live, we'd call that a culvert.

Kariachi

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25548 on: February 14, 2014, 11:43:50 AM »
Okay, here's a snowy weather snowflake. A few eeks ago my area had a white-out. As in, my mom's work opened late because everybody called in to say they weren't coming in till it cleared up enough to see more than twenty feet level of white-out. My dad does not have that luxury (this is the same place the requires you to clock out when you use the bathroom so they can be sure you aren't using it too often).

He heads out to work. Halfway there, he has to go through a hamlet.

Now tell me, visibility is low, you're at a full stop, someone is on the road you want to turn onto and is about ten feet away, there's a good inch of ice and several inches of snow on the road, what do you do?

What do you think Mr. Snowflake did?

Someday some idiot is going to kill themselves on these roads and I just hope they don't take any innocents with them.
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EMuir

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25549 on: February 14, 2014, 11:48:25 AM »
I wish she had pressed charges; I would have! She was really rattled by it - even talking about it got her upset! The guy is a menace and he thought he was completely justified! Classic Snowflake!

I actually disagree.  In a perfect world, he would have been punished and life would have gone on. 

In our imperfect world, "do not engage the crazy" may apply here.  If he was that enraged at someone who he thinks cut him off, how angry would he get at someone who pressed charges against him?  He might see it as her personally attacking him.  Combine that with her admitting she's scared and he could easily take the chance to harass and intimidate her personally. 

Should he be able to do that? No.  But it may have simplified that poor woman's life considerably to just drop it.

jaxsue

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25550 on: February 14, 2014, 11:48:32 AM »


Jersey Girl here...the first time you have to pump gas I assure you that you are convinced that you are convinced you are going to blow everything up!   Also our gas is cheapter and you don't have to pump it..I can see why one would not want to have to pay more to pump it yourself!

I need that t-shirt (another NJ resident).  :)

jaxsue

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25551 on: February 14, 2014, 11:50:11 AM »
That is a BRIDGE???   :o

Where I live, we'd call that a culvert.

"Culvert" for me, too. You see a lot of those in rural upstate NY.

guihong

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25552 on: February 14, 2014, 12:40:34 PM »
I find it very hard to believe that woman has been driving for even a SHORT amount of time and hasn't encountered a self-serve gas station before! 

My parents used to own a garage/gas station/convenience store and I started working there when I was about 13.  Pumping gas is NOT difficult. 

However, figuring out what side your gas tank is on.....  that's a whole other story.

Quote
Our local gas station is set up with quite narrow lanes which I first observed at Costco, and now are popping up all over the place. You are only supposed to enter from one end, and exit on the other. Each gas lane has two pumps - forward and rear, and several HUGE yellow arrows indicating the direction, and which way you turn when you pull forward to "EXIT==>" per the big huge sign and arrow. The single exit lane is a narrow drive which is hard to pass two cars through, and also has another gigantic arrow and "EXIT" on the pavement. I'm pulling up to a "front" pump when some huge minivan comes squealing around the blind side of the pumps to try to go the wrong-way down my gas lane.


I can't tell you how many people I saw driving around the pump islands because they got out and realized their tank was on the OTHER side....  They'd then come around to the next island, get out, and OOPS!  Other side again!!!  We'd get quite a chuckle out of the folks who did this quite a few times before just driving off....  Apparently our pumps didn't work with their cars.   I can only imagine how this one-ways thing will mess with more than a few minds out there!

I didn't learn how to pump gas until I was 21 (started driving at 17) I'm from NJ, land of full-serve only, and although I went to school out of state, I didn't have my own car until then. And if I was with my parents, which I was, on plenty of out of state trips, my dad always filled up the car.

But, knowing I didn't have a clue, when I got to school, I asked a friend who did know how to go with me, and show me how to do it. so that when I had to, I wouldn't stand there going, duh, duh, what do I do?  even now, 30+ years later, when I travel out of state, I still have a moment of "how does THIS pump work?"

As for the gas tank side, I bought a new car last spring, with the gas on the opposite side of every other car I've owned. I can't tell you how many times as I drive up to the gas station, I'm telling myself "driver side, driver side"

So it is possible to go through life not knowing how to pump gas, but, its easy enough to learn, if you choose to.

I live in NJ, too, and love the full-service stations! However, I grew up elsewhere, so I learned how to pump gas at a very young age. What's funny is when you see an out-of-state car at a NJ pump, and the driver gets out and starts doing it himself/herself.  :)

I've done that while visiting Oregon  :-[.  The first time I visited my brother there, we pulled up at a gas station.  The attendant came out and began pumping the gas.  I asked DB, "Isn't it cheaper to go through self-service?"



Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25553 on: February 14, 2014, 01:18:18 PM »
I find it very hard to believe that woman has been driving for even a SHORT amount of time and hasn't encountered a self-serve gas station before! 

My parents used to own a garage/gas station/convenience store and I started working there when I was about 13.  Pumping gas is NOT difficult. 

However, figuring out what side your gas tank is on.....  that's a whole other story.

Quote
Our local gas station is set up with quite narrow lanes which I first observed at Costco, and now are popping up all over the place. You are only supposed to enter from one end, and exit on the other. Each gas lane has two pumps - forward and rear, and several HUGE yellow arrows indicating the direction, and which way you turn when you pull forward to "EXIT==>" per the big huge sign and arrow. The single exit lane is a narrow drive which is hard to pass two cars through, and also has another gigantic arrow and "EXIT" on the pavement. I'm pulling up to a "front" pump when some huge minivan comes squealing around the blind side of the pumps to try to go the wrong-way down my gas lane.


I can't tell you how many people I saw driving around the pump islands because they got out and realized their tank was on the OTHER side....  They'd then come around to the next island, get out, and OOPS!  Other side again!!!  We'd get quite a chuckle out of the folks who did this quite a few times before just driving off....  Apparently our pumps didn't work with their cars.   I can only imagine how this one-ways thing will mess with more than a few minds out there!

I didn't learn how to pump gas until I was 21 (started driving at 17) I'm from NJ, land of full-serve only, and although I went to school out of state, I didn't have my own car until then. And if I was with my parents, which I was, on plenty of out of state trips, my dad always filled up the car.

But, knowing I didn't have a clue, when I got to school, I asked a friend who did know how to go with me, and show me how to do it. so that when I had to, I wouldn't stand there going, duh, duh, what do I do?  even now, 30+ years later, when I travel out of state, I still have a moment of "how does THIS pump work?"

As for the gas tank side, I bought a new car last spring, with the gas on the opposite side of every other car I've owned. I can't tell you how many times as I drive up to the gas station, I'm telling myself "driver side, driver side"

So it is possible to go through life not knowing how to pump gas, but, its easy enough to learn, if you choose to.

I live in NJ, too, and love the full-service stations! However, I grew up elsewhere, so I learned how to pump gas at a very young age. What's funny is when you see an out-of-state car at a NJ pump, and the driver gets out and starts doing it himself/herself.  :)

I've done that while visiting Oregon  :-[.  The first time I visited my brother there, we pulled up at a gas station.  The attendant came out and began pumping the gas.  I asked DB, "Isn't it cheaper to go through self-service?"

It's actually cheaper full-serve, presumably because having a dedicated specialist reduces the chances of bad things.
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jedikaiti

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25554 on: February 14, 2014, 01:24:05 PM »
I remember being confused the first time I drove a new car and I went to pump my gas and I couldn't flip the tank cover open. It was completely smooth! How was I supposed to pull it ajar so I could fill the gas tank? Luckily for me, a kind person saw my dilemma and explained to me that many cars now have buttons on the interior that you need to press in order to open the gas tank cover.  ::)  Boy, did I feel dumb.

I had a heck of a time filling up my Mom's car once. I could NOT get the stupid gas door open! Turns out that my habit of locking the doors when I got out of the car was also locking her gas door. Oops.
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RingTailedLemur

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25555 on: February 14, 2014, 02:00:01 PM »
I remember being confused the first time I drove a new car and I went to pump my gas and I couldn't flip the tank cover open. It was completely smooth! How was I supposed to pull it ajar so I could fill the gas tank? Luckily for me, a kind person saw my dilemma and explained to me that many cars now have buttons on the interior that you need to press in order to open the gas tank cover.  ::)  Boy, did I feel dumb.

I had a heck of a time filling up my Mom's car once. I could NOT get the stupid gas door open! Turns out that my habit of locking the doors when I got out of the car was also locking her gas door. Oops.

I did that the first time I filled up my first car.  I forced it open, hurt myself, and didn't realise until the cashier pointed it out that I'd ended up with blood all over my hand.

jolyan

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25556 on: February 14, 2014, 03:00:14 PM »
I don't remember anyone ever teaching me.  Maybe my dad did when I was too little to remember, or I just watched him and my mom.  I did make sure my girls learned by filling up the car once or twice when they were grade schoolers.

Why anyone would want a woman to be so helpless in this day and age is beyond me.  It's a scary world out there and being stranded on the road due to not being able to put gas in your car is ludicrous.

Come to think of it, teaching them how to put on a spare tire would be a good idea too.  Hmmm...


My dad taught me to change a tire as a condition of learning to drive.

When I was a teenager, my parents taught me how to change a tire and check fluids and pump gas among other things.  Its rare to find a full service gas station in Michigan.  I have AAA for towing etc as my current car tires are hard to change so it is best to leave it in the hands of pros instead.

I know of one in Michigan. Its in a small town.

athersgeo

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25557 on: February 14, 2014, 05:33:36 PM »
I remember being confused the first time I drove a new car and I went to pump my gas and I couldn't flip the tank cover open. It was completely smooth! How was I supposed to pull it ajar so I could fill the gas tank? Luckily for me, a kind person saw my dilemma and explained to me that many cars now have buttons on the interior that you need to press in order to open the gas tank cover.  ::)  Boy, did I feel dumb.

I had a heck of a time filling up my Mom's car once. I could NOT get the stupid gas door open! Turns out that my habit of locking the doors when I got out of the car was also locking her gas door. Oops.

I did that the first time I filled up my first car.  I forced it open, hurt myself, and didn't realise until the cashier pointed it out that I'd ended up with blood all over my hand.

Clearly this is something really quite common, because the dealer who sold me my brand new car made quite a big deal out of how to get into the petrol tank. At the time I was feeling vaguely patronised, but given this thread I'm actually now quite pleased! Now, if only I could remember that the filler cap is on the other side... (Twelve years of driving with the filler cap on the left vs two months of driving with the cap on the right... Still, I have got the hang of where reverse gear is, so there's probably hope for me yet!)

Sirius

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25558 on: February 14, 2014, 05:53:07 PM »
I grew up in a state that has all self serve stations so it always takes me a minute when I go up to visit family in NJ to remember I'm not supposed to pump it myself.

I'm in WA state, I have to remember that in OR they aren't self serve either.

I live in Oregon, and it took some getting used to when I moved here from California.

Sirius

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #25559 on: February 14, 2014, 06:02:22 PM »
SS: Well, hell, I'm E! The light is on!! And it's been on for awhile! I can't pump my own gas! I mean...do I look like someone who knows how to pump gas?
Me: Um...(Well, you're driving a car so I'd assume yes but clearly...no?)
SS: Screw it, I'm just gonna call triple A.
Me: Ok great, sounds like you have a plan, have a nice day!

How'd you like to be the AAA operator taking that call?

"So you say you're at Bob's Gas Station... Parked in front of one of the pumps... "

I suspect that the obnoxious driver expected Me to offer to pump it for her, and would probably have fussed the whole time about how long it was taking, etc. etc. etc.

When I worked at a place that had gas pumps, it was California where everyone pumps their own.  If someone had come up there and leaned on the horn and/or insisted I pump their gas, they'd have been out of luck.  Once my sister pumped gas for someone who didn't understand the signs that were in English and also didn't understand that she was trying to pump regular into a car with an unleaded tank.  Sis happened to be waiting at the store for me to get off work so that I could give her a ride home, and she did me a favor by helping because I had a line of customers 10 deep at the register.