Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5555287 times)

2 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

VorFemme

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 13079
  • Strolls with scissors! Too tired to run today!
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26235 on: April 09, 2014, 12:20:21 PM »
A vacuum cleaner hose to remove what you can from the lint filter opening and the exhaust will speed drying.  Excess lint blocks air intake & exhaust to slow drying AND can be a fire hazard - cleaning is a good idea.  Taking less time means less power used when running the dryer.  So - an all around GOOD idea - but I will admit that it is only slightly more fun than a root canal....

I try to do it every year...or so...because Houston in the summer is hot enough without having to run the dryer even an extra ten minutes with each load of wash...and drying clothes without a dryer takes too long without a clothesline - the Home Owners' Association does NOT approve them. 

VorGuy did NOT know the questions to ask when he was looking at houses - and found out after his signature (and mine - he had POA) was already on the mortgage & deed what he had gotten into since he didn't ask first.  He loves the house.  I think it's okay - but it doesn't match MY list as well as it matches his list of preferences. 
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

Lorelei_Evil

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2043
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26236 on: April 09, 2014, 12:27:53 PM »
Also, you can put a dry beach towel in with a wet load of washing to speed drying.

Slartibartfast

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 11785
    • Nerdy Necklaces - my Etsy shop!
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26237 on: April 09, 2014, 12:33:57 PM »
Okay, yeah, this one is a bit of a doozy, so you might want to be sitting down . . .

FIL has joined a local chapter of a large organization.  The kind mostly populated by old white guys who like to show off how rich they are.  (FIL and MIL aren't, not really, but FIL can keep up appearances well enough and he likes rubbing shoulders with this crowd.)  MIL absolutely hates being forced to socialize with them, but they have pretty frequent events for which bringing your spouse is strongly encouraged, so she's gone to quite a few.  There's a fancy dinner coming up, and she wants to skip it, but FIL got really grumpy because she skipped the last one.  He said she "wasn't being supportive."

The reason she skipped was because SIL1 was in the hospital having emergency surgery, having come home after living in a homeless camp a thousand miles away for the last year or so, and someone had to make sure SIL1 didn't up and walk out of the hospital as soon as she was mobile and SIL's kids aren't speaking to her at the moment.

But no, MIL is "not supportive."  Not at all.

knitwicca

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 219
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26238 on: April 09, 2014, 02:22:49 PM »
I know I've mentioned this but I don't remember where:

A co-worker of mine told me that when she had her wisdom teeth pulled her husband woke her up and made her cook dinner for him, which she did.  She asked me if my husband did that; she and I had each gotten married at about the same time and we'd often compare notes as to what it was like being a newlywed in our respective decades, as I was about 20 years older than her.  I told her, "My husband would either make his own dinner or bring home takeout, and then he'd leave me some."  She couldn't believe that I wouldn't just hop out of bed when I was sick and cook for my husband.  I see her husband as the SS in this situation, because I felt that it was appalling that he made her get up when she was high on pain meds and cook dinner for him.  I asked her why he didn't just make himself a sandwich, and she told me, "He says that's my job."

I had a co-worker who had a major surgery scheduled.
She spent every evening for a week cooking and cleaning so that she would not have to do so during her recovery....because her husband was the same. No way would he have "lowered" himself to make a sandwich or pick up take-out.
Oh...their 10-year-old daughter was responsible for the heating, serving and cleaning up of the meals my co-worker prepared.

The worst (in my view) was the husband worked with us as well. He was proud of the fact he never lifted a finger for household chores.

AfleetAlex

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 490
  • Proud cat mom and Auntie
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26239 on: April 09, 2014, 02:24:49 PM »
You know, that would really affect my respect for him in a professional setting even though this was happening in his personal life. If he does that at home, what is he like at work to the women he works with??
I have a chronic case of foot-in-mouth disease.

TootsNYC

  • A Pillar of the Forum
  • *****
  • Posts: 30953
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26240 on: April 09, 2014, 02:29:18 PM »
You know, that would really affect my respect for him in a professional setting even though this was happening in his personal life. If he does that at home, what is he like at work to the women he works with??

Or, even more powerfully from a work point of view: what sort of "That's not MY job" stuff is he going to pull? What things will he just not pay attention to because they're not "his"?

jedikaiti

  • Swiss Army Nerd
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2807
  • A pie in the hand is worth two in the mail.
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26241 on: April 09, 2014, 02:30:16 PM »

Ours is about 30 years old. The advantage of the older machines is there's so little to go wrong. And I prefer my clothes to be practical rather than just looking good. Nothing that requires special treatment exists in my wardrobe.
Mine is about 20 years and I agree with you. No computer chips, so less to fail. It looks a bit bashed about, but it works fine.

Our last ones were nowhere near that old, and not working so well. I knew the dryer was on its last legs (it was hit or miss if it would get hot, or if it did, how hot), but to see how much CLEANER our clothes suddenly were with the new washer was impressive.

Some machines are clearly built to last more than others. :-)
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

knitwicca

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 219
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26242 on: April 09, 2014, 02:30:55 PM »
You know, that would really affect my respect for him in a professional setting even though this was happening in his personal life. If he does that at home, what is he like at work to the women he works with??


He made the unfortunate mistake of addressing me as "sweetie" once.... >:D once was adequate.  (he had to resort to a dictionary to determine whether I was insulting him)


GlitterIsMyDrug

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1120
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26243 on: April 09, 2014, 02:36:54 PM »
I know I've mentioned this but I don't remember where:

A co-worker of mine told me that when she had her wisdom teeth pulled her husband woke her up and made her cook dinner for him, which she did.  She asked me if my husband did that; she and I had each gotten married at about the same time and we'd often compare notes as to what it was like being a newlywed in our respective decades, as I was about 20 years older than her.  I told her, "My husband would either make his own dinner or bring home takeout, and then he'd leave me some."  She couldn't believe that I wouldn't just hop out of bed when I was sick and cook for my husband.  I see her husband as the SS in this situation, because I felt that it was appalling that he made her get up when she was high on pain meds and cook dinner for him.  I asked her why he didn't just make himself a sandwich, and she told me, "He says that's my job."

I had a co-worker who had a major surgery scheduled.
She spent every evening for a week cooking and cleaning so that she would not have to do so during her recovery....because her husband was the same. No way would he have "lowered" himself to make a sandwich or pick up take-out.
Oh...their 10-year-old daughter was responsible for the heating, serving and cleaning up of the meals my co-worker prepared.

The worst (in my view) was the husband worked with us as well. He was proud of the fact he never lifted a finger for household chores.

I can't understand this. I make breakfast for us everyday. Every morning we walk the dogs, and when we get home she goes to shower and I make us our breakfast. But then I was sick. This was awhile back, but I could barley climb the stairs to go to bed. I ended up camping in the living room. Partner made her own breakfast. She made me breakfast too (though I couldn't eat it most days), then she'd go to work after making sure I had something easy to make/eat for lunch, and then she'd come home and make us dinner. Because we are a team. And of course daily duties are split up. If I make breakfast it makes her morning easier. But when a team mate is down, you help that team mate. Not pout until the team mate gets up and helps you.

What did these men do for food prior to being married? Did they just go hungry? Call up mom for dinner delivery?

TootsNYC

  • A Pillar of the Forum
  • *****
  • Posts: 30953
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26244 on: April 09, 2014, 02:38:34 PM »
They probably got married right away. Or they made their own meals so badly that they wanted to get a maid wife right away.

Free Range Hippy Chick

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 766
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26245 on: April 09, 2014, 02:44:20 PM »
You know, that would really affect my respect for him in a professional setting even though this was happening in his personal life. If he does that at home, what is he like at work to the women he works with??

Or, even more powerfully from a work point of view: what sort of "That's not MY job" stuff is he going to pull? What things will he just not pay attention to because they're not "his"?

When we were newly married, we used to take it in turn to cook, or cook together, because we were both going out to work, and we had the habit that the last one out in the morning started the washing machine, and the first one home emptied it. My DH at the time worked in a rather old-fashioned environment, and when his co-workers learned this, they were inclined to barrack him about 'women's work' and 'not being head of his own household'. He felt that it got old quite quickly, and one day when somebody gave him grief and asked why he did it, he said calmly 'well, I thought that it wasn't smart to put myself completely into somebody else's power through sheer incompetence. If the Hippy Chick leaves me, at least I can feed myself and keep myself clean.'

He said the two men whose marriages were known to be less than altogether stable were suddenly very, very thoughtful.

jedikaiti

  • Swiss Army Nerd
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2807
  • A pie in the hand is worth two in the mail.
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26246 on: April 09, 2014, 02:45:03 PM »
As my Grandfather said to my Dad (after he'd complimented my Mom's less-than-stellar cooking): "You've been eating in greasy spoons too long."

*Mom did learn to cook and was quite good at it by the time I entered the picture.
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

siamesecat2965

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8788
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26247 on: April 09, 2014, 02:56:25 PM »
My mom did all the cooking when I was growing up, and quite honestly, and self-admittadly, she isn't very good, beacuse she loathes it, so puts very little effort into it.

My dad took early retirement when he was 58, and promptly took over the cooking. Mom LOVED this since he also took over grocery shopping, another loathsome chore to her. She did the dishes, and everyone was happy!  Dad also was capable (but didn't have to) of cleaning, dusting, vacuuming etc. At that point, they had someone come in to do it.

MissRose

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2940
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26248 on: April 09, 2014, 03:07:42 PM »
Since my dad retired, my mom has made things simple since it is just the 2 of them now.  She pre-makes and freezes many things like soups, stews, etc.  She makes my dad go to the freezer and pick on most days for the following day something from the freezer, put it in the fridge to thaw, then either one can warm up it to eat for supper.   My dad has learned to do simple cooking of items like baking french fries/tater tots with chicken nuggets or fish sticks then open a can of veggies to be heated in the microwave.  He does wash dishes, goes grocery shopping, takes out trash, and knows how to put things in the dryer to dry.

Harriet Jones

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6723
  • Yes, we know who you are.
Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26249 on: April 09, 2014, 03:17:36 PM »


What did these men do for food prior to being married? Did they just go hungry? Call up mom for dinner delivery?

 
Or ate a lot of cereal or sandwiches.   Or pizza.