Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5753517 times)

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alkira6

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26250 on: April 09, 2014, 03:23:56 PM »
One of the guys my husband works with as giving him a hard time about being the "little woman" because he took over cooking and grocery shopping in January.  My husband finally just looked at him and said that at the end of the night he got into bed with a well fed, rested, and happy woman.  What did he get?  >:D

Shalamar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26251 on: April 09, 2014, 03:59:02 PM »
Quote
(he had to resort to a dictionary to determine whether I was insulting him)

And now I HAVE to know what you called him.   ;)

VorFemme

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26252 on: April 09, 2014, 04:11:16 PM »
I tried telling a coworker who complained that I did not know how to cuss that if I needed to insult someone that I would tell them that they were the illegitimate miscegenetic offspring of a priapic orangutan with the mange and a flea bitten she-camel.  If nothing else, they wouldn't try punching me until after they got through looking up all the long words...giving me time to hit them over the head with the collegiate dictionary (which is large enough to make a good weapon, in my opinion) and escape.

Or, at work, to call in the first sergeant, who was much better at being intimidating than I was.

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Thipu1

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26253 on: April 09, 2014, 04:34:09 PM »


What did these men do for food prior to being married? Did they just go hungry? Call up mom for dinner delivery?

 
Or ate a lot of cereal or sandwiches.   Or pizza.

This was a classic problem with men of my parents' generation. 

These were men who lived at home until they were drafted during WW II and married soon after the
 war. At home, their mother saw to all their needs.  In the Army, the army took care of all their needs.  Once they got married, new wives were schooled by the man's family to take care of all their needs.  It was pathetic. 

My father and many of his friends weren't exactly sure how much money they were bringing home
because the pay envelope went directly into the hands of the women and the men were given a weekly allowance.

When the wives of these men died, they were at a complete loss.  Many of them didn't know what size clothes they wore or how many spoons of sugar they liked in their tea because there was always a woman to do it for them.  Heck, my mother had to teach some of them how to balance a
checkbook and write a check to pay a bill.       

blue2000

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26254 on: April 09, 2014, 04:57:58 PM »
I saw that with my own generation in my first year of college. People standing lost in the laundry room or the kitchen because they had never even watched their parents do things. And OK, they can order a pizza. But not store/reheat the leftovers, make coffee, wash a dirty cup, etc.

And we had our share of guys who wanted to get married so the 'little woman' could warm their bed, wash their socks, and cook dinner. ::) Because, you know, that's a wife thing. They shouldn't have to do it themselves.
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Kiwichick

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26255 on: April 09, 2014, 05:17:42 PM »


What did these men do for food prior to being married? Did they just go hungry? Call up mom for dinner delivery?

 
Or ate a lot of cereal or sandwiches.   Or pizza.

This was a classic problem with men of my parents' generation. 

These were men who lived at home until they were drafted during WW II and married soon after the
 war. At home, their mother saw to all their needs.  In the Army, the army took care of all their needs.  Once they got married, new wives were schooled by the man's family to take care of all their needs.  It was pathetic. 

My father and many of his friends weren't exactly sure how much money they were bringing home
because the pay envelope went directly into the hands of the women and the men were given a weekly allowance.

When the wives of these men died, they were at a complete loss.  Many of them didn't know what size clothes they wore or how many spoons of sugar they liked in their tea because there was always a woman to do it for them.  Heck, my mother had to teach some of them how to balance a
checkbook and write a check to pay a bill.     

Some men of your parents' generation. 

My Dad, born in the late 20s parented us as much as, if not more than my Mum.  He crocheted my cot blankets, made fab strawberry jam, did his share of the housework and more. 

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26256 on: April 09, 2014, 05:27:22 PM »
I was so pleased when I found out DH knows how to cook, and when he does put a meal together it's not bad at all, but these days he's usually so tired on his days off that when I say I'm not in the mood to cook, he either orders dinner or asks one of the boys to make something, which typically means bland pasta. :P

Note to self, make sure boys know how to cook other dishes.  I've told them how to make sure meats and poultry are done, and usually 350 for 30 minutes will do the trick, but time perhaps to teach them a bit more, perhaps.
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Wulfie

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26257 on: April 09, 2014, 05:33:27 PM »
My great grandma was at a loss when my great grandpa passed away in the late 1990s.  He always took care of all the bills, she had accounts at all the stores they used or used cash. She had no clue how to write a check, what a utility bill was or even what bank they used.  My grandma had to sit her down and teach her all of that kind of stuff.  Mom made sure that we all knew how to do all of that before we were in high school.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26258 on: April 09, 2014, 05:40:16 PM »
I read somewhere that it's healthy for boys to have a gap between living at home with parents and living with a spouse. A man who knows his way around a kitchen is a keeper. When DH and I were dating he cooked for me, not frozen food or pizza but a nice piece of grilled salmon and vegetables. We share kitchen duties, though I'm the one who insists on a clean kitchen before I start and keep washing up all the way through. I do like how our son is going to grow up seeing both his parents cook, and I plan to start early with him just like with me.

Yarnspinner

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26259 on: April 09, 2014, 06:25:11 PM »
More helpless library not-quite-snowflakes-but-still...

Are there THAT many people in the world who have NO idea how a copy machine works?  I could have paid off the mortgage in dimes today for every one I had to show how to place the paper, how to put the coins in the slot, how to hit the button, how to retrieve the paper from the printer and on and on and on.

One woman insisted up and down I was doing it wrong, but declined to spend money to show me that it was wrong.  These printers are old enough to vote, may even be eligible for social security....you use them to make prints of things you want to read later or make copies of the GOOD original before you send it off.  They aren't for making creamy clean gorgeous resume worthy copies you are going to send to prospective employers.  We tell people this up front.  But they, who have no clue how to use these machines, seem to know better than we do.

And then there was the lady who couldn't decide if she wanted me to have the ONLY circulating copy of a very necessary text sent from another branch or if she wanted to go there and pick it up.  Seriously, ma'am, if you need it tonight, then go get it tonight.  Otherwise, it's a two day wait.  Deliberating on this for twenty minutes still doesn't make it rocket science. 

This was all on the inside of course.  She's a very nice lady and I wanted to make her happy....but TWENTY MINUTES ASKING ME ABOUT IT?  REALLY?  Happily, my nice and calm and naive coworker was there to take over when the steam started coming out of my ears.

GlitterIsMyDrug

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26260 on: April 09, 2014, 06:26:40 PM »
I read somewhere that it's healthy for boys to have a gap between living at home with parents and living with a spouse.

I'm of the thought that that's a good idea for anyone. I love Partner and I love living with her, but I'm proud of the time I was on my own. I paid my own bills, kept up my own house, stood on my own two feet. Gave me a sense of satisfaction and pride to know I could do that.

Shea

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26261 on: April 09, 2014, 06:38:11 PM »
I read somewhere that it's healthy for boys to have a gap between living at home with parents and living with a spouse. A man who knows his way around a kitchen is a keeper. When DH and I were dating he cooked for me, not frozen food or pizza but a nice piece of grilled salmon and vegetables. We share kitchen duties, though I'm the one who insists on a clean kitchen before I start and keep washing up all the way through. I do like how our son is going to grow up seeing both his parents cook, and I plan to start early with him just like with me.

Absolutely. BF and I live together, and I do most of the cooking, but he's perfectly capable in the kitchen, and our rule is whoever doesn't cook is the one to do the dishes.

Anyway, a special snowflake (and possible Darwin Award candidate) I saw on my way to work the other day: a young woman driving along at around 120-125 km/h (speed limit in that area is 100 km/h) while putting on her make up, looking in the rearview mirror, using one hand to hold her makeup brush and the other to hold the makeup :o. Goodness knows how she was managing to steer. I got out of her way and let her get well ahead of me, I didn't want to get anywhere near that kind of crazy.


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greencat

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26262 on: April 09, 2014, 07:14:45 PM »
I lived with a roommate who told us, when he was embarrassed at not being able to function on a normal adult level, that his extremely religious parents believed that he would only move out of their house to move in with a wife, and therefore they never taught him to do anything at all around the house.

My ex who lived with me the longest never learned to cook, and quite frankly, given how his grandmother (who raised him, his bio-parents weren't in the picture) cooked, I'm not surprised.  I tried to teach him, but the effort proved to be dangerous for my kitchen!

I dated a different guy and worked with a woman who were second-generation non-cookers - both of them decided to correct that when they were faced with living off only their own income.

Today's special snowflake was the big industrial truck that couldn't wait one second for the car in front of him to turn into the parking lot at the bank - he almost hit the guy, not just once, but riding his bumper for the minute or two it took them to make the right turn into the lot.  I thought I was about to witness a road rage incident!

jedikaiti

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26263 on: April 09, 2014, 07:20:35 PM »
I lived with a roommate who told us, when he was embarrassed at not being able to function on a normal adult level, that his extremely religious parents believed that he would only move out of their house to move in with a wife, and therefore they never taught him to do anything at all around the house.

My ex who lived with me the longest never learned to cook, and quite frankly, given how his grandmother (who raised him, his bio-parents weren't in the picture) cooked, I'm not surprised.  I tried to teach him, but the effort proved to be dangerous for my kitchen!

I dated a different guy and worked with a woman who were second-generation non-cookers - both of them decided to correct that when they were faced with living off only their own income.

Today's special snowflake was the big industrial truck that couldn't wait one second for the car in front of him to turn into the parking lot at the bank - he almost hit the guy, not just once, but riding his bumper for the minute or two it took them to make the right turn into the lot.  I thought I was about to witness a road rage incident!

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magicdomino

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26264 on: April 09, 2014, 07:26:47 PM »
I know I've mentioned this but I don't remember where:

A co-worker of mine told me that when she had her wisdom teeth pulled her husband woke her up and made her cook dinner for him, which she did.  She asked me if my husband did that; she and I had each gotten married at about the same time and we'd often compare notes as to what it was like being a newlywed in our respective decades, as I was about 20 years older than her.  I told her, "My husband would either make his own dinner or bring home takeout, and then he'd leave me some."  She couldn't believe that I wouldn't just hop out of bed when I was sick and cook for my husband.  I see her husband as the SS in this situation, because I felt that it was appalling that he made her get up when she was high on pain meds and cook dinner for him.  I asked her why he didn't just make himself a sandwich, and she told me, "He says that's my job."

I had a co-worker who had a major surgery scheduled.
She spent every evening for a week cooking and cleaning so that she would not have to do so during her recovery....because her husband was the same. No way would he have "lowered" himself to make a sandwich or pick up take-out.
Oh...their 10-year-old daughter was responsible for the heating, serving and cleaning up of the meals my co-worker prepared.

The worst (in my view) was the husband worked with us as well. He was proud of the fact he never lifted a finger for household chores.

My mother scornfully referred to people like this as chickens who'd starve beside a pile of corn.