Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5756889 times)

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Shalamar

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26685 on: May 05, 2014, 04:42:38 PM »
Oh, yes.  I drive (no pun intended) my 17-year-old daughter nuts because I can't stop hitting the imaginary brake when she's driving.  Now that she has her license, I never have to drive with her again if I don't want to, and that suits me.  The silly thing is, she's actually a very good driver - I just HATE not being the one in control.

Funnily enough, I drove her somewhere recently, and she kept saying "Mum, slow down" and "Mum, you're too close to that car" - while hitting the imaginary brake.  :)

mmswm

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26686 on: May 05, 2014, 05:23:01 PM »
I try to keep my use of the passenger side brake pedal to a minimum.  Sometimes though, bracing for impact is involuntary.  I went with a friend to work one week.  He's a truck driver.  There was this one incident where I was sure there was no way he could avoid impact.  A guy in a  delivery van cut him off on a downhill mountain grade then brake checked my friend. We were in a fully loaded semi.  In the less than a second I had to think I was sure there was no way to avoid an impact.  I was wrong.  My friend is a very, very good driver and handles that truck better than most people can handle a small car.  Impact was avoided, but instinct still kicked in and I couldn't help gasping and bracing for the worst.
Some people lift weights.  I lift measures.  It's a far more esoteric workout. - (Quoted from a personal friend)

wheeitsme

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26687 on: May 05, 2014, 05:48:02 PM »
When I was learning to drive, my mother used what I called her "air brakes". That sharp intake of air between her teeth.  ;)

rose red

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26688 on: May 05, 2014, 06:59:12 PM »
This is about my sibling's coworker, but I know her too. She is a real mooch. The latest is that a fast food place is giving out a free small coffee. She ordered two and the cashier told her it was one per customer and she'll have to pay for the second cup. She threw a fit and then continued to complain to her coworkers at work all morning. It doesn't help explaining that if customers can have more than one for free, there's nothing to stop everyone from ordering 20 small coffees and they'll lose money. She doesn't care because that won't affect her. She has such zero empathy that it's a bit scary.

VorFemme

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26689 on: May 05, 2014, 07:32:16 PM »
Not the worst SS - but I was at the doctor's office & waiting in my room (having been weighed, blood pressure, and temperature taken) when I realized that I really ought to go to the bathroom if the doctor was not coming in to see me in the next, oh, ten minutes.

Went into hallway & the single bathroom door was locked.  The door across the hall from it opened and the guy in that room was standing in the door, looking at the bathroom door.  I told him that it was locked and went back to stand in my door (only place out of the way in the hallway without being in either someone else's room or the lab with the lab tech getting ready to do a blood draw....).

The person in the bathroom comes out and the closer guy swoops in ahead of me while making a half heard comment about "maybe *mumble* selfish of me"...

I went back to the doorway of my room to concentrate on NOT doing the dance of the impatient four year old...bouncing makes the need worse at my age.  When he came out, I made a low voiced comment as I went in along the lines of "there was a reason that I already knew that the door was locked"...

When I came out, he mumbled something about "sorry about that"...I got the impression that HE thought that I had been leaving the room when someone else went in behind me....instead of I was checking the door because I wanted to be "next".  Either that or he thought that he'd be done faster, since he wasn't going to have to disrobe to the same degree, being male.  Or he just didn't think about it...bathroom empty, he's closest, and he didn't think that anyone else was in line...because my door was further away...

Never mind that most people don't stand in the doorway & watch the bathroom door waiting for the door knob to twitch unless they would like to be NEXT in that room....

I'm still not sure if he's Captain Oblivious or figured that he was closer & could "finish" faster. 

But I'm glad that there wasn't anyone in the hallway waiting to swoop into the bathroom after he got out before I could get to it....
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

Jones

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26690 on: May 05, 2014, 08:31:50 PM »
He did apologize though, it sounds like.

BB-VA

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26691 on: May 05, 2014, 09:52:00 PM »
I refused to teach my daughter to drive.  As a teenager, I watched my father teaching my stepsister, and decided he was NOT going to teach me.  After that, I decided it is something that was best left to a third party, and as I told the kid, I want us to be speaking when you get your license.   

"The Universe puts us in places where we can learn. They are never easy places, but they are right. Wherever we are, it's the right place and the right time. Pain that sometimes comes is part of the process of constantly being born."
- Delenn to Sheridan: "Babylon 5 - Distant Star"

gmatoy

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26692 on: May 05, 2014, 10:02:31 PM »
He did apologize though, it sounds like.

Yes, but I think it was one of those "easier to apologize than to ask permission" apologies.

marcel

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26693 on: May 05, 2014, 11:39:15 PM »
I refused to teach my daughter to drive.  As a teenager, I watched my father teaching my stepsister, and decided he was NOT going to teach me.  After that, I decided it is something that was best left to a third party, and as I told the kid, I want us to be speaking when you get your license.
I personaly still find the concept of letting amateurs teach people to drive baffling, and then I hadn't even thought about what it would do to the relationship between parents and children to do this :)
Wherever you go..... There you are.

TootsNYC

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26694 on: May 05, 2014, 11:41:38 PM »
We sent our kid to a pro instructor, but she needs a lot more driving time, just for practice. I refuse to pay through the nose for that!

I had lessons through school, but I got my driving practice w/ my parents, and I actually mentally think that my mother taught me to drive. She didn't, but the coaching she did as I practiced with her is the instruction I remember most.

MommyPenguin

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26695 on: May 06, 2014, 12:40:17 AM »
I refused to teach my daughter to drive.  As a teenager, I watched my father teaching my stepsister, and decided he was NOT going to teach me.  After that, I decided it is something that was best left to a third party, and as I told the kid, I want us to be speaking when you get your license.
I personaly still find the concept of letting amateurs teach people to drive baffling, and then I hadn't even thought about what it would do to the relationship between parents and children to do this :)

I had a friend whose dad was *not* very good at teaching her to drive.  Whenever she did something he didn't like, he'd elbow her really hard.  She got bruises all up and down her side and was terrified of getting in a car and terrified of driving.  He was not normally abusive (although rather strict and authoritarian and didn't have a good relationship with her), but the car just pushed him over the top.  She went off to college without having learned to drive or gotten her license.  Interestingly, both my dad *and* the boy who was to become my husband ended up giving her driving lessons, and she got her license at 19 or 20 I think.  And my husband had only gotten his own license at 18 and was a year younger than us, so he'd just gotten his license himself before teaching her.

It is odd in some ways that an amateur teaches you to drive, but I think part of the problem is that it takes a *lot* of driving time and practice to get good at driving, it's best done naturally (i.e. driving to pick little sister up from soccer, driving to the mall, driving to and from your job), and it would just get too expensive to pay somebody to teach you all of those hours.

Of course, I read a book that talked about a guy sending his kids to a special driving academy (in Colorado?) where they do things like deliberately put you into a skid on a greased track and have you pull out of it, etc., so that they would really truly be safe and proficient drivers in any circumstances.  They'd already had licenses and been driving for years, but he said their minds were blown at their experiences there and they became *way* more confident and controlled behind the wheel.

nuit93

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26696 on: May 06, 2014, 01:47:05 AM »
My mom hated having to practice driving with me (because, wasn't that what Driver's Ed was for?  Never mind that I would have failed if I didn't get enough practice outside of that...), so as soon as I'd learned enough to pass Driver's Ed and the driving test she handed me the keys to the subcompact I'd be driving. 

This was the same car I learned to drive a manual in...needless to say I didn't know she even knew certain curse words until she tried to teach me to drive a stick.  Basically it was "you're 18 and you have a license, stick to the less busy roads until you have a better idea of what you're doing".  So, after school most days I'd drive around the neighborhood practicing and perfecting my driving skills.  MUCH more relaxing than having a parent in the car.

Harriet Jones

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26697 on: May 06, 2014, 07:16:58 AM »
The laws in my state require a certain amount of practice driving time -- that can be expensive if you're paying a driving school.  The one near us charges $55/hour to use their car for extra driving practice. 

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26698 on: May 06, 2014, 07:56:35 AM »
DH's mother drove trucks for a living for a while and she was the one who taught him to drive, including taking him to an icy parking lot to learn how to handle a car on ice if he were to encounter it. 
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Hollanda

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26699 on: May 06, 2014, 08:18:32 AM »
Took DS to the farm yesterday.  It was a fab day until we got beseiged by a flurry of snowflakes who decided that the picnic area was theirs and theirs only. No, no it's not.
 
Yes, we moved for this "family" of at least 4 kids...not because we really wanted to, but because we felt sorry for the kids having parents like that.  Smoking in an area full of babies and kids (there are notices asking people politely to stand just to the right of the main entrance to smoke, to protect those who don't want to breathe in cigarette fumes), shouting the odds to anyone who would listen, telling the children to "just sit there, they'll move cos people do for kids, innit?"
 
Ditto when it came to feeding the lambs with the milk.  The same family shoved their ways in front of DS and I, so that DS was forced to wait until the next intake (only 4 people allowed in at a time and then they were out, next children in). Fair enough, DS has to learn to wait. But what is this mother teaching her children by encouraging them to push into queues like that? "You're special, you don't have to wait, you can just go straight to the front."
 
That isn't how life works, dearie.
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Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.