Author Topic: Special Snowflake Stories  (Read 5554474 times)

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HoneyBee42

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26700 on: May 06, 2014, 08:36:22 AM »
I nominate a driver I saw last night.

I work in a hospital (I'm in the business office, but we're physically in the hospital), and driving cross town from work on a road which is semi-country (fields most of the way, but there are some businesses here and there, mostly towards one end or the other of the road), two lanes (one each direction) although wide enough that they could put a third lane in.  This road is quite straight, and mostly flat, so you can see almost all the way to the other end of the road from where the hospital is.

As I'm driving on this road about a half mile from work, I see coming toward me an ambulance with lights and siren on.  There's a car in front of the ambulance which did *not* pull over, but did take a turn after about a quarter of a mile (so they left the road in question).  Everyone in my direction of travel had pulled over and everyone else in the other direction had also, so once the SS departed, the ambulance came down the middle of the road to get to the hospital.

Because clearly, being delayed for, at most two minutes, is just absolutely intolerable for a SS.  I can't imagine where one might be going that is more important than getting a patient to the ER (I know that not all ambulances come in with lights and siren, so when they do, you know it's quite serious and one of those 'every minute counts' situations).


gingerzing

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26701 on: May 06, 2014, 11:00:37 AM »
(More silly one)
I nominate the Mama and Papa goose that were taking their fluffy gossling for a walk this morning across a busy rush hour road.  And little fluff goose was checking out the road for bugs.  SIGH.

Mal

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26702 on: May 06, 2014, 11:23:09 AM »
Yes, we moved for this "family" of at least 4 kids...not because we really wanted to, but because we felt sorry for the kids having parents like that.  Smoking in an area full of babies and kids (there are notices asking people politely to stand just to the right of the main entrance to smoke, to protect those who don't want to breathe in cigarette fumes), shouting the odds to anyone who would listen, telling the children to "just sit there, they'll move cos people do for kids, innit?"

Side note, I will never forget my mom addressing the man blowing smoke right in her face on a train platform: "Excuse me, do you mind? I mean, I don't fart right in your face, now do I?"

Elisabunny

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26703 on: May 06, 2014, 05:43:30 PM »
Yes, we moved for this "family" of at least 4 kids...not because we really wanted to, but because we felt sorry for the kids having parents like that.  Smoking in an area full of babies and kids (there are notices asking people politely to stand just to the right of the main entrance to smoke, to protect those who don't want to breathe in cigarette fumes), shouting the odds to anyone who would listen, telling the children to "just sit there, they'll move cos people do for kids, innit?"

Side note, I will never forget my mom addressing the man blowing smoke right in her face on a train platform: "Excuse me, do you mind? I mean, I don't fart right in your face, now do I?"

I think I love your mom. ;D
You must remember this: a ghoti is still a fish...

gmatoy

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26704 on: May 06, 2014, 07:54:58 PM »
Yes, we moved for this "family" of at least 4 kids...not because we really wanted to, but because we felt sorry for the kids having parents like that.  Smoking in an area full of babies and kids (there are notices asking people politely to stand just to the right of the main entrance to smoke, to protect those who don't want to breathe in cigarette fumes), shouting the odds to anyone who would listen, telling the children to "just sit there, they'll move cos people do for kids, innit?"

Side note, I will never forget my mom addressing the man blowing smoke right in her face on a train platform: "Excuse me, do you mind? I mean, I don't fart right in your face, now do I?"

I think I love your mom. ;D
Elisabunny, I agree!

BB-VA

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26705 on: May 06, 2014, 09:46:58 PM »
I refused to teach my daughter to drive.  As a teenager, I watched my father teaching my stepsister, and decided he was NOT going to teach me.  After that, I decided it is something that was best left to a third party, and as I told the kid, I want us to be speaking when you get your license.
I personaly still find the concept of letting amateurs teach people to drive baffling, and then I hadn't even thought about what it would do to the relationship between parents and children to do this :)

I had a friend whose dad was *not* very good at teaching her to drive.  Whenever she did something he didn't like, he'd elbow her really hard.  She got bruises all up and down her side and was terrified of getting in a car and terrified of driving.  He was not normally abusive (although rather strict and authoritarian and didn't have a good relationship with her), but the car just pushed him over the top. 
<snip>

Dad would slap Stepsister on the leg whenever she used her left foot on the brake.   She was learning to drive in summer and was wearing shorts.  She would have a red leg when she got out of the car.

That said, she did learn to drive and had her license by the end of the year.  Still, I didn't want him to teach me.   So I did take Driver Ed and my DH (then boyfriend) taught me to drive a stick.
"The Universe puts us in places where we can learn. They are never easy places, but they are right. Wherever we are, it's the right place and the right time. Pain that sometimes comes is part of the process of constantly being born."
- Delenn to Sheridan: "Babylon 5 - Distant Star"

lisat

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26706 on: May 07, 2014, 12:13:02 AM »
We live out in the country-farm land. Our area is fast being developed into subdivisions. People like to buy houses out in the country because it is soo peaceful. Because it is farm land we use alot of fertilizer in the fall/spring. It is manure and it does stink at first. Cows do moo and chickens do cackle. The amount of complaints about how we are ruining their happiness with these aspects are incredible. Our crops end 10' from the road. This gives you plenty of room to look for traffic, it does not mean that you can willy nelly decide to cut down the corn to see farther down. We are county folk and do hunt. We help keep the deer population under control-which in turn will help you keep all that lovely landscaping that you are paying for to last at least a little bit longer. The deer thank you. Seriously-what do people think when they move into farm lands?

CrazyDaffodilLady

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26707 on: May 07, 2014, 12:23:36 AM »
(More silly one)
I nominate the Mama and Papa goose that were taking their fluffy gossling for a walk this morning across a busy rush hour road.  And little fluff goose was checking out the road for bugs.  SIGH.
Canadian geese are God's most arrogant creatures.  They enjoy taking their time crossing the road when you're waiting.  But those fuzzy goslings sure are cute, and the parents are so proud of them.
It takes two people to play tug of war. If you don't want to play, don't pick up the rope.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26708 on: May 07, 2014, 06:44:48 AM »
We live out in the country-farm land. Our area is fast being developed into subdivisions. People like to buy houses out in the country because it is soo peaceful. Because it is farm land we use alot of fertilizer in the fall/spring. It is manure and it does stink at first. Cows do moo and chickens do cackle. The amount of complaints about how we are ruining their happiness with these aspects are incredible. Our crops end 10' from the road. This gives you plenty of room to look for traffic, it does not mean that you can willy nelly decide to cut down the corn to see farther down. We are county folk and do hunt. We help keep the deer population under control-which in turn will help you keep all that lovely landscaping that you are paying for to last at least a little bit longer. The deer thank you. Seriously-what do people think when they move into farm lands?

I wish I could say that surprised me, but I've known of people like this.  We moved from a well developed area to one with a lot more farms around. Now we do live in the city limits but I've seen trailers with farm animals pass through town, and on more than one occasion I've caught whiffs of manure being used for fertilizer.   I may be weird but I kinda like it as it means we are in a less developed area and that there are farms nearby.  It tickles me to walk out of the movie theater and see cows across the street. :) And as you said, all farmers keep their crops from blocking the view of oncoming traffic.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Talley

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26709 on: May 07, 2014, 07:06:12 AM »
We live out in the country-farm land. Our area is fast being developed into subdivisions. People like to buy houses out in the country because it is soo peaceful. Because it is farm land we use alot of fertilizer in the fall/spring. It is manure and it does stink at first. Cows do moo and chickens do cackle. The amount of complaints about how we are ruining their happiness with these aspects are incredible. Our crops end 10' from the road. This gives you plenty of room to look for traffic, it does not mean that you can willy nelly decide to cut down the corn to see farther down. We are county folk and do hunt. We help keep the deer population under control-which in turn will help you keep all that lovely landscaping that you are paying for to last at least a little bit longer. The deer thank you. Seriously-what do people think when they move into farm lands?
I guess, these are the same kind of people who buy a house right next to a church - a well-known and very active church, which has been there for many, many years - and then complain that the church bells ring at certain times and that there are cars parked on the street on Sunday mornings and special occasions, like Christmas, during service times... My father has lived across the street from that church for over 70 years and is good friends with the current care-taker (who has been there for 40 years or so) - the stories they could tell...


athersgeo

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26710 on: May 07, 2014, 07:11:55 AM »
Special Snowflake "Didn't Check The Location When She Moved" edition

A cricket team in Oxfordshire have been forced to ban hitting sixes* because of one resident who has threatened to sue them if any more balls come into her back garden.

The reason I say she's a special snowflake is this: The cricket ground has been there 80 odd years. She is (so the news article said) in her 60s. In other words, the cricket ground is older than she is - or, to put it another way, the cricket ground was there when she bought the house. Given that, I'm not sure she'd get anywhere if she did attempt to sue** - but the cricket club, like a lot of amateur sports clubs, can't afford to take that risk.


*a six is when the ball reaches the boundary without touching the ground - I think it's probably equivalent to a home run in baseball
**not legal opinion; just an observation from having dealt with similar situations in the past

LadyJaneinMD

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26711 on: May 07, 2014, 08:01:26 AM »
Dad would slap Stepsister on the leg whenever she used her left foot on the brake.   She was learning to drive in summer and was wearing shorts.  She would have a red leg when she got out of the car.

That said, she did learn to drive and had her license by the end of the year.  Still, I didn't want him to teach me.   So I did take Driver Ed and my DH (then boyfriend) taught me to drive a stick.

That's why it's a very good idea to learn how to drive a stick shift in the first place. The left foot never gets used for anything but the clutch.

I learned to drive, and took my test on a stick.  In the 70s, when I learned, gas prices were just starting to climb, and at the time, stick shifts were better on gas. (Nowadays, automatics are so efficient that it doesn't matter anymore).  HOWEVER....when I was in my 20s, driving a stick meant that I never had to loan my car to my friends, and now that I'm old and gray, driving a stick means that my car is less likely to be stolen!

Mediancat

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26712 on: May 07, 2014, 08:15:12 AM »
We live out in the country-farm land. Our area is fast being developed into subdivisions. People like to buy houses out in the country because it is soo peaceful. Because it is farm land we use alot of fertilizer in the fall/spring. It is manure and it does stink at first. Cows do moo and chickens do cackle. The amount of complaints about how we are ruining their happiness with these aspects are incredible. Our crops end 10' from the road. This gives you plenty of room to look for traffic, it does not mean that you can willy nelly decide to cut down the corn to see farther down. We are county folk and do hunt. We help keep the deer population under control-which in turn will help you keep all that lovely landscaping that you are paying for to last at least a little bit longer. The deer thank you. Seriously-what do people think when they move into farm lands?

I wish I could say that surprised me, but I've known of people like this.  We moved from a well developed area to one with a lot more farms around. Now we do live in the city limits but I've seen trailers with farm animals pass through town, and on more than one occasion I've caught whiffs of manure being used for fertilizer.   I may be weird but I kinda like it as it means we are in a less developed area and that there are farms nearby.  It tickles me to walk out of the movie theater and see cows across the street. :) And as you said, all farmers keep their crops from blocking the view of oncoming traffic.

Up where I used to live in Southern York County, there was a housing development that looked over some rolling farmland. Until the farmer decided to scale back and donate some of his land to, I think, a church youth center, which would remove the crops and put in a couple of buildings.

Well, this was intolerable to the people in the development. They loved their views! Didn't the farmer know they;d come up there for the relaxing countryside! And besides, they said triumphantly, that land was zoned for farms! Not youth centers! So take that, farmer!

The farmer said, fine. Instead of donating it to my church, I'll turn it into a pig farm. Lots of mud and pigs roaming around. Plus, there'll be a slaughterhouse right on the premises, and gee, I hope the smell doesn't bother you nice folks up on the hill . . .

The church got its youth center.

Rob
"In all of mankind's history, there has never been more damage done than by someone who 'thought they were doing the right thing'." -- Lucy, Peanuts

Cherry91

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26713 on: May 07, 2014, 08:17:17 AM »
Special Snowflake "Didn't Check The Location When She Moved" edition

A cricket team in Oxfordshire have been forced to ban hitting sixes* because of one resident who has threatened to sue them if any more balls come into her back garden.

The reason I say she's a special snowflake is this: The cricket ground has been there 80 odd years. She is (so the news article said) in her 60s. In other words, the cricket ground is older than she is - or, to put it another way, the cricket ground was there when she bought the house. Given that, I'm not sure she'd get anywhere if she did attempt to sue** - but the cricket club, like a lot of amateur sports clubs, can't afford to take that risk.


*a six is when the ball reaches the boundary without touching the ground - I think it's probably equivalent to a home run in baseball
**not legal opinion; just an observation from having dealt with similar situations in the past

I'm going to play devil's advocate here and say I can partly see her side of this.

Yes, she should have done more research into the area, and yes, threatening to sue is never a nice thing to do, and yes, it's an overreaction in this case but I can understand her frustration if balls coming into her garden is a regular occurrence. She could be concerned about the possibility of pets or grandchildren getting hurt (if she has them) or her plants or windows getting damaged. Not to mention, as a 60 year old woman, she could be quite intimidated by strange men she doesn't know either knocking on her door to retrieve a ball or trying to jump her fence to grab it, and even if they don't do so, she could be worried they might.

Without more info, all I can make is assumptions, but most people don't go from 0 - "I'll sue!" It's entirely possible that she has tried the polite approach first and been shrugged off, and is now having to resort to more drastic action to make sure the club is paying attention.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Special Snowflake Stories
« Reply #26714 on: May 07, 2014, 08:24:13 AM »
My mother tried to teach me to drive a stick and it just didn't go very well.  She had been saying for a while, "you should just learn by watching!" But I'm not very good at learning simply by watching someone else do it. It's one thing if they're explaining as they drive why they're shifting at a certain time.  Or with anything else, I want to know what it is they're doing rather than simply watching. 

So when DH bought a car with a manual transmission once we were married, he put me behind the wheel, told me how to start it off, when to shift and how to tell by the sound of the engine when to shift.  He taught the basics of starting and getting it going, then let me figure out the rest.  Now that frustrated me but oh man I learn and I have to say, now we have a van with automatic, I actually miss driving a stick.

It's funny too, I could be driven to a location several times but not remember how to get there, but after I've driven myself there once I rarely forget.

As for living near a ball park, that's one reason I wonder why someone would live near a golf course, as I'd be worried about stray balls breaking windows or hitting people in the head, or people wandering into a yard to get the balls.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata