Author Topic: Home Buying Etiquette  (Read 13286 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

bridalviolet

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 19
Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #75 on: March 22, 2014, 06:06:05 PM »
We just sold our house. We had a number of showings and one thing I did every single time was to put out fresh-baked cookies and fresh-perked coffee on the counter with a note saying "Please help yourself." They always did, of course!  :) Our agent loved it, the prospective buyers loved it, and one agent who came through said, "In fourteen years selling homes this is the first time I've ever been offered treats!" We got a ton of positive feedback and our house sold in about three months (starting in the winter, the worst time for showings!).

lofty

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 63
    • My blog and shops
Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #76 on: March 28, 2014, 01:19:24 PM »
It may have been mentioned before, but it bears repeating; buyers, when you schedule a showing, please show up. If you cannot show up, please call. If you cannot call that moment because something horrible has happened, please at least respond to the message we sent asking if you were still coming so we know we didn't dream the entire appointment!

Grrrrr... >:(
Coffee and paper make everything better, hence why my blog is www.CaffeinatedPapercuts.com

MrTango

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2041
Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #77 on: March 29, 2014, 08:38:41 PM »
It may have been mentioned before, but it bears repeating; buyers, when you schedule a showing, please show up. If you cannot show up, please call. If you cannot call that moment because something horrible has happened, please at least respond to the message we sent asking if you were still coming so we know we didn't dream the entire appointment!

Grrrrr... >:(

Same thing goes for Realtors.

We had a showing scheduled for a house, and apparently the seller accepted an offer the evening before our showing was to happen.  I never got a phone call from the Realtor that was supposed to show me the house.

We waited around for 15 minutes after our showing was to happen, and then I went and checked my email.  10 minutes after the appointment time, he sent me an email letting me know the situation and that since an offer had been accepted, he couldn't show us the house.

shortstuff

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 48
Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #78 on: March 30, 2014, 09:40:34 AM »
If you are not planning on moving, don't put your house on the market...or at least let the buyer's agent know that you are not taking offers.

My fiance and I put an offer on a house on Sunday. It turns out that the man who was selling the house refused to sign the contract because he didn't want to move.  Thank you, sir, for wasting my time, my fiance's time, my agent's time, your agent's time, and your wife's time. It's nice that you are retired, but some of us still work and would rather not spend our weekends looking at and making offers on houses that the owners have no intention of selling.

 >:(


They might not want to move, but sometimes they have to.  Did the owner realize that he had to move but figured that the offer was not high enough?

The first house that Dh bought (before we were married) had had really weird selling-conditions.  The wife and her husband had separated/divorced years earlier but she was still living in it with three kids - older teens through early 20s.  Apparently the separation agreement stated that she could stay in the house till the youngest kid reached age 19 - that's the age-of-majority here - or, moved out.  Then the house would have to be sold.

What ended up happening was that the youngest kid, at 18, was ready to move out.  Then, the mother was stuck having to move herself and the two older kids out.  To put it mildly, she had absolutely no motivation in encouraging a sale.  The carpets were absolutely filthy, the house had many places where painting had been started and suddenly stopped - etc. - you get the idea.  Never mind the shoddy maintenance and sometimes scary DIY repairs - even I could see the absolutely dangerous electrical "repairs" the previous owner had done.

Not wanting to get into legal issues here, but is it possible that it's an "ordered sale" and the owner just doesn't want to face it?  Or perhaps he's figuring that his home is worth way more $$$  than the evaluated value and is insisting on more?

I encountered something similar when trying to view a house for sale.  The owner was upside down on his mortgage (owed more to the bank than the house could sell for) and was somehow forced by the bank negotiations to have the house for sale.  But when we tried to view it, he stayed home during the appointment and dead-bolted the inside door, so even with our buyer's agent having the key from the lock box, we couldn't get in. 

When our agent caller the seller's agent to complain, the seller's agent was very confused and tried to tell us we had the wrong time.  After some Realtor back and forth snark, they told us that, yes, we had an appointment, but no, the owner didn't want to sell so wasn't going to let us in.  It was such a waste of a day.  I felt bad for the poor owner, he obviously wanted to keep his home, but don't take it out on us.

Mopsy428

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1813
Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #79 on: April 10, 2014, 10:05:34 PM »
If you are not planning on moving, don't put your house on the market...or at least let the buyer's agent know that you are not taking offers.

My fiance and I put an offer on a house on Sunday. It turns out that the man who was selling the house refused to sign the contract because he didn't want to move.  Thank you, sir, for wasting my time, my fiance's time, my agent's time, your agent's time, and your wife's time. It's nice that you are retired, but some of us still work and would rather not spend our weekends looking at and making offers on houses that the owners have no intention of selling.

 >:(


They might not want to move, but sometimes they have to.  Did the owner realize that he had to move but figured that the offer was not high enough?

The first house that Dh bought (before we were married) had had really weird selling-conditions.  The wife and her husband had separated/divorced years earlier but she was still living in it with three kids - older teens through early 20s.  Apparently the separation agreement stated that she could stay in the house till the youngest kid reached age 19 - that's the age-of-majority here - or, moved out.  Then the house would have to be sold.

What ended up happening was that the youngest kid, at 18, was ready to move out.  Then, the mother was stuck having to move herself and the two older kids out.  To put it mildly, she had absolutely no motivation in encouraging a sale.  The carpets were absolutely filthy, the house had many places where painting had been started and suddenly stopped - etc. - you get the idea.  Never mind the shoddy maintenance and sometimes scary DIY repairs - even I could see the absolutely dangerous electrical "repairs" the previous owner had done.

Not wanting to get into legal issues here, but is it possible that it's an "ordered sale" and the owner just doesn't want to face it?  Or perhaps he's figuring that his home is worth way more $$$  than the evaluated value and is insisting on more?
No. The comps were right within what they were asking for, and we offered full asking price plus a few thousand in closing costs. The male owner was 89 years old, and refused to move. His 83 year old wife was his caretaker, and she wanted to sell the house and move into something smaller. (Neither can go upstairs.)

The seller's agent was "assisting" in showing another house we looked at a few days ago and mentioned that the man had previously signed a contract, but then he backed out of it because he "wanted to die in that house". I wanted to say, "OK. After that fiasco, why did they put it back on the market? I'm sure the almost-homeowners were as pleased as punch with this guy's antics."

katycoo

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3596
Re: Home Buying Etiquette
« Reply #80 on: April 10, 2014, 10:42:11 PM »

So as a buyer you have an agent yourself who takes you to properties for sale?  That's a new concept to me, does the buyer's agent make a commission from the sale?  Is it the same agent you're using to sell? 

Here, an estate agent sells properties, or manages rented ones, they work entirely for sellers or landlords never for buyers or renters.

Yes, in the U.S., most buyers would have their own agent.  The agent's job is to sort through the multiple listing service to pick out the best prospects, make appointments for showing, escort the buyers (this may or may not include driving the buyers), then help with buying the home.  For this, the buyer's agent gets between 1% and 3% of the home price as commission.  Some agents specialize in buyers only; others handle both buying and selling.

By law, real estate agents for the seller are required to work in the seller's interests.  If you find the house on your own, for instance by driving by a for-sale sign, you can probably skip having your own agent, but it is still recommended that you have your own real estate attorney or other professional to double check the fine print.

There's a feeling that it's unethical for one agent to represent both both the buyer and the seller. You can't be looking out for my best interests if you are also looking out for their's, kinda thing.

Its definitely unethical for a conveyancer or lawyer to act for both parties, but not agents.  I suspect Larrabee is Australian too.  We do our own research (there are 2 major housing sales/rental websites pretty much everyone use) and when you find a place you like you can contact the seller's agent about it.  Public open homes are the norm, so you just turn up at the advertised time if you want to see the house.  Private inspections can be arranged if you cannot make the open home.