Author Topic: Lent Etiquette  (Read 22031 times)

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Jolie_kitten

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #75 on: March 08, 2011, 04:59:14 AM »
...cut...
But we don't practice "giving up something" for Lent; the church has a specific fasting regime which I think I discussed earlier in the thread.
I remember it was strongly encouraged that people try to stop cursing and thinking bad thoughts as well giving up dancing and...um, Scrabble :). (This is all besides actual fasting.). I'd say there's a lot of giving up.

Edited to hopefully phrase my thoughts better.

I remember that- Ex-BF (now very good friend :) ) is agnostic and I'm non-religious, but we were both baptised. My folks do identify as Christian but they're the type who go to church at Easter time and that's it; his mother, however, is quite devout and church-going. So one year we had a little holiday before Easter and we spent the first part of it at my place (my folks were away for the holiday, in Bulgaria) and the other half at his place, with his family. So, first we were cracking jokes about how we're living in sin and not keeping lent, then when we went to his place he warned me that we should be careful with any displays of affection around his folks, 'cause from *that point of view* lent is a big deal to them.
I've never heard of giving up dancing, though (and I'm from the same country as Andra.)
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Thipu1

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #76 on: March 08, 2011, 02:44:23 PM »
St. Patrick's Day, which always falls during Lent, was a holiday in my Catholic High School.  that was because St. Patrick is the patron saint of the Archdiocese.   

Xallanthia

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #77 on: March 08, 2011, 03:18:10 PM »
...cut...
But we don't practice "giving up something" for Lent; the church has a specific fasting regime which I think I discussed earlier in the thread.
I remember it was strongly encouraged that people try to stop cursing and thinking bad thoughts as well giving up dancing and...um, Scrabble :). (This is all besides actual fasting.). I'd say there's a lot of giving up.

Edited to hopefully phrase my thoughts better.

I remember that- Ex-BF (now very good friend :) ) is agnostic and I'm non-religious, but we were both baptised. My folks do identify as Christian but they're the type who go to church at Easter time and that's it; his mother, however, is quite devout and church-going. So one year we had a little holiday before Easter and we spent the first part of it at my place (my folks were away for the holiday, in Bulgaria) and the other half at his place, with his family. So, first we were cracking jokes about how we're living in sin and not keeping lent, then when we went to his place he warned me that we should be careful with any displays of affection around his folks, 'cause from *that point of view* lent is a big deal to them.
I've never heard of giving up dancing, though (and I'm from the same country as Andra.)

Hah!  I'm pretty conservative with my fast (including doing the very strict fast this week, not eating all day before Presanctified, etc), but we don't do THAT fast.  I think DH would go insane :P

eport

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #78 on: March 09, 2011, 11:55:15 AM »
I was raised Catholic and in my household it was definitely cheating if you indulged on Sunday.  I never heard the whole exempltion on Sunday thing until I came here so it isn't somethign encouraged among all parishes.

This has been my experience as well.

What about St Patricks day?  :)

If it is during Lent your obligations apply.  I was never taught anything different and did not see anybody I know make exceptions.  It seems a bit strange to me that people would claim that to honor a saint they'd be less religiously observant than normal.

My very Irish grandparents were concerned when St. Patrick's Day fell on Friday that they would not be able to have corned beef. They discussed this with the parish priest. The priest being of Irish desent and having a good sense of humor, wrote up an official dispendsation letter on parish stationary allowing them and their "legimate heirs" to have corned beef on St. Patricks Day, no matter what the Lenten obligations. It was all offical (whereas, the Doughertys are good Catholics and good Irishmen, Whereas...). They have teh letter framed in their house

bobsyouruncle

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #79 on: March 09, 2011, 11:59:24 AM »
I was raised Catholic and in my household it was definitely cheating if you indulged on Sunday.  I never heard the whole exempltion on Sunday thing until I came here so it isn't somethign encouraged among all parishes.

This has been my experience as well.

What about St Patricks day?  :)

If it is during Lent your obligations apply.  I was never taught anything different and did not see anybody I know make exceptions.  It seems a bit strange to me that people would claim that to honor a saint they'd be less religiously observant than normal.

My very Irish grandparents were concerned when St. Patrick's Day fell on Friday that they would not be able to have corned beef. They discussed this with the parish priest. The priest being of Irish desent and having a good sense of humor, wrote up an official dispendsation letter on parish stationary allowing them and their "legimate heirs" to have corned beef on St. Patricks Day, no matter what the Lenten obligations. It was all offical (whereas, the Doughertys are good Catholics and good Irishmen, Whereas...). They have teh letter framed in their house
I think this is definitely a parish by parish thing because I know my friend's (Catholic) church does a dispensation every year for St. Paddy's Day.

Edit - it might also have to do with the fact that it is a very Irish neighborhood - I'm assuming Catholic parishes who are majority Spanish, Italian etc have no such dispensations.

Luci

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #80 on: March 09, 2011, 12:28:52 PM »
Someone gave up EHell last year, I think. She came back.

We had friends who had to have special permission to get married, during Lent. He was in his 70's and she in her late 60's. Or am I misunderstanding that?

Xallanthia

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #81 on: March 09, 2011, 12:54:21 PM »
Someone gave up EHell last year, I think. She came back.

We had friends who had to have special permission to get married, during Lent. He was in his 70's and she in her late 60's. Or am I misunderstanding that?

I don't know if the Catholics still limit marriages during fasts, but historically it was definitely true.  In the Orthodox church you are not supposed to get married during any of the fasts (in addition to Lent, there are fasts for the 40 days before Christmas, 2 weeks in August (related to the Virgin Mary), and a few weeks in early summer (for the Apostles).  I got married on the last weekend before the Nativity Fast... my mother wanted another month to plan and my priest and I said NO! lol

Poirot

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #82 on: March 09, 2011, 02:35:29 PM »
It was still true in my parish when I first married 26 years ago. I do remember attending catholic weddings during Lent though. So maybe it's a parish by parish thing like St. Patrick's Day.
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TootsNYC

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #83 on: March 14, 2011, 09:47:51 PM »
My pastor has suggested *adding something* instead of giving something up. The idea is discipline, getting closer to God.

As for the Sunday thing--my pastors have pointed out that Sundays are not technically part of Lent. But we give up saying "alleluia" for the season, and that applies to Sundays as well.

Sharnita

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #84 on: March 15, 2011, 08:56:44 AM »
to my knowledge there aare no marriages, baptisms, confirmations, etc during Lent.  They start again at Easter vigil which is part of why the service is so long.

Thipu1

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #85 on: March 15, 2011, 12:10:24 PM »
to my knowledge there aare no marriages, baptisms, confirmations, etc during Lent.  They start again at Easter vigil which is part of why the service is so long.

I'm sorry, Sharnita.

Mr. Thipu and I were married in a Roman Catholic church during Lent.  No one had a problem with it.     

Luci

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #86 on: March 15, 2011, 02:54:45 PM »
It was still true in my parish when I first married 26 years ago. I do remember attending catholic weddings during Lent though. So maybe it's a parish by parish thing like St. Patrick's Day.
to my knowledge there aare no marriages, baptisms, confirmations, etc during Lent.  They start again at Easter vigil which is part of why the service is so long.

I'm sorry, Sharnita.

Mr. Thipu and I were married in a Roman Catholic church during Lent.  No one had a problem with it.     

DD (Lutheran) attended a Catholic wedding last Saturday. March 12.

Also, please correct me if I am wrong, I thought that infants have to be Baptised ASAP, and even at birth if it seems they won't survive. Baptism and Last Rites all at once.

So right now, I'm believing the bolded.


Poirot

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #87 on: March 15, 2011, 03:00:36 PM »
Emergency baptisms/last rites/funerals can take place anytime of course, but the formal, planned baptism ceremonies are not done in my church during lent. I think it's more a traditional thing than a church 'law'. A priest would never refuse last rights to the sick or baptism to a sickly baby just because it was lent nowadays, but the church in the old days could be pretty cruel.
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Two Ravens

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #88 on: March 15, 2011, 03:11:49 PM »
The RCC does not allow weddings during Holy Week (Palm Sunday - Easter).  I am sure special dispensations can be applied for, though.

I was married during Lent.  The Church did not allow us to bring flowers into the church (aside from bouquets), but everything else was fine.

Sharnita

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #89 on: March 15, 2011, 07:05:02 PM »
the idea of baptising ASAP is not really pushed any more, at least not in the parishes where I attended.  The priests were fine with kids being months old, even when Lent was not the reason.