Author Topic: Lent Etiquette  (Read 21759 times)

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TootsNYC

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #45 on: March 29, 2010, 03:50:56 PM »

I used to bring donuts to a morning study session at law school, until a classmate gave them up for Lent.  (Gee, no wonder I gained so much weight in law school!)  So we switched to muffins and bagels for a few weeks so she could have breakfast too.

But doesn't that sort of negate the "giving things up for Lent" idea? This eliminates the sacrifice.

Kiara

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #46 on: March 30, 2010, 10:10:33 AM »
Nope.  The classmate didn't give up all breakfast breads, she gave up donuts.  (And even if she had given up all breakfast breads, she's able to not take something.)

marcel

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #47 on: March 30, 2010, 10:21:14 AM »
Nope.  The classmate didn't give up all breakfast breads, she gave up donuts.  (And even if she had given up all breakfast breads, she's able to not take something.)
What I Think toots means that if you start taking other breakfasts breads, then she doesn't really give anything up.
If you would still be bringing donuts, then the classmate is giving something up.

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Sharnita

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #48 on: March 30, 2010, 10:24:20 AM »
Nope.  The classmate didn't give up all breakfast breads, she gave up donuts.  (And even if she had given up all breakfast breads, she's able to not take something.)
What I Think toots means that if you start taking other breakfasts breads, then she doesn't really give anything up.
If you would still be bringing donuts, then the classmate is giving something up.



Giving up donuts =/=  giving up all flavored bread type object.  If I gave up ice cream somebody might offer me yogurt instead.  Just because they are both dairy products eaten with a spoon doesn't mean the yogurt negates the ice gream.

Kiara

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #49 on: March 30, 2010, 11:48:47 AM »
Sharnita, that's it exactly.   :)

MDefarge

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #50 on: March 30, 2010, 12:57:59 PM »
Nope.  The classmate didn't give up all breakfast breads, she gave up donuts.  (And even if she had given up all breakfast breads, she's able to not take something.)
What I Think toots means that if you start taking other breakfasts breads, then she doesn't really give anything up.
If you would still be bringing donuts, then the classmate is giving something up.



Giving up donuts =/=  giving up all flavored bread type object.  If I gave up ice cream somebody might offer me yogurt instead.  Just because they are both dairy products eaten with a spoon doesn't mean the yogurt negates the ice gream.

Definitely - and if its a morning study session I think its really nice of them to switch from donuts so that she can still have breakfast with the group.

MissRose

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #51 on: March 05, 2011, 09:04:10 AM »
Bumping up as Lent is coming next week for our Catholic E-Hellions (like me)......

bobsyouruncle

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #52 on: March 05, 2011, 09:41:32 AM »
I'm not Christian (although I was raised that way) but is anyone else thrown a bit off balance by how late Easter is this year? (April 24) at least everyone should be warmer than when it's the end of March.

Thipu1

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #53 on: March 05, 2011, 10:59:21 AM »
In the 1950s I was growing up in a very strict Roman Catholic home.  We gave up a lot for lent.  However, it wasn't horrible because Sundays were exempt from Lent.  It was perfectly acceptable to have a small piece of candy on Sunday afternoon. It was also acceptable for everyone in the family to have ice cream on Sunday evening.     

If you trace the 'forty days' of traditional Lent from Ash Wednesday to Easter Saturday, you'll see that Sundays aren't included in the count .  Sometimes non-Catholics say that's cheating.  We didn't think that at all.           

Sharnita

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #54 on: March 05, 2011, 11:11:15 AM »
I was raised Catholic and in my household it was definitely cheating if you indulged on Sunday.  I never heard the whole exempltion on Sunday thing until I came here so it isn't somethign encouraged among all parishes.

Danismom

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #55 on: March 05, 2011, 11:45:41 AM »
I'm in the process of debating what to give up this year.  I'm United Methodist but have been observing the practice of a lenten sacrifice since junior high.

SiotehCat

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #56 on: March 05, 2011, 01:39:25 PM »
I was raised Catholic and in my household it was definitely cheating if you indulged on Sunday.  I never heard the whole exempltion on Sunday thing until I came here so it isn't somethign encouraged among all parishes.

This has been my experience as well.

PeytiePotatie

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #57 on: March 05, 2011, 07:44:32 PM »
In the 1950s I was growing up in a very strict Roman Catholic home.  We gave up a lot for lent.  However, it wasn't horrible because Sundays were exempt from Lent.  It was perfectly acceptable to have a small piece of candy on Sunday afternoon. It was also acceptable for everyone in the family to have ice cream on Sunday evening.     

If you trace the 'forty days' of traditional Lent from Ash Wednesday to Easter Saturday, you'll see that Sundays aren't included in the count .  Sometimes non-Catholics say that's cheating.  We didn't think that at all.           

I've never heard of that, but man do I wish that I had when I was a kid! (The year I gave up chocolate, I seriously felt like Lent lasted about 40 years! And I think I mentioned it to my parents about 5 times a day. :))

proudmama

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #58 on: March 05, 2011, 10:54:33 PM »
In the 1950s I was growing up in a very strict Roman Catholic home.  We gave up a lot for lent.  However, it wasn't horrible because Sundays were exempt from Lent.  It was perfectly acceptable to have a small piece of candy on Sunday afternoon. It was also acceptable for everyone in the family to have ice cream on Sunday evening.     

If you trace the 'forty days' of traditional Lent from Ash Wednesday to Easter Saturday, you'll see that Sundays aren't included in the count .  Sometimes non-Catholics say that's cheating.  We didn't think that at all.           

I've never heard of that, but man do I wish that I had when I was a kid! (The year I gave up chocolate, I seriously felt like Lent lasted about 40 years! And I think I mentioned it to my parents about 5 times a day. :))

I lived across the street from a convent growing up.  We were very friendly with the nuns, our neighbors.  One Sunday during lent, my siblings and I were over visiting.  I was offered some M&M's, which I declined and explained that I gave them up for lent.  The nun told me that Sundays were exempt.  I was so happy until I got home and my mom didn't believe me. I had to ask the nun to explain to my mom that yes, I was allowed to eat M&M's on Sunday.  :-)

marcel

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Re: Lent Etiquette
« Reply #59 on: March 06, 2011, 04:34:20 AM »
I was raised Catholic and in my household it was definitely cheating if you indulged on Sunday.  I never heard the whole exempltion on Sunday thing until I came here so it isn't somethign encouraged among all parishes.

This has been my experience as well.
But technically you can then start lent a week later, otherwise you have a 47 day period.
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