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  • December 15, 2017, 02:29:15 PM

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Author Topic: story from the past  (Read 10856 times)

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Momof2Pekes

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Re: story from the past
« Reply #15 on: May 03, 2017, 12:57:59 PM »
That's a very sweet story and I'm glad you resurrected the thread!

Twik

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Re: story from the past
« Reply #16 on: May 05, 2017, 09:44:32 AM »
My MIL is into ancestry. She called me up recently, crying because she was discovering how many children her ancestral relatives lost in infancy/young childhood. I managed to cheer her up eventually with a crack about how she had a 100% success rate because she had one child and he made it to adult hood. Then I hung up the phone and held my kiddies a little tighter.

I don't know if it's a random act of kindness, per se, but family lore talks about DH's grandmother, who as a child was dying of some fever. Her parents had been kind to the Indians on the reservation about 30 miles away, and when he heard, the medicine man came to help her. He went to the backyard and "picked some flowers", made teas of some and burnt others. DH's grandmother is now into her 90s, and one of the few people of her generation in this area from whom I've never heard a racist comment.

Wow!  What a wonderful story!

I bet that the teas did a lot of good.  I've been drinking rose hip tea lately, and have more energy.  It's too bad that so few people know which herbs are medicinal any more.

The other side of that is some people will read a website and say, "Oh, herb X is good for Y!" and start sloshing it back. Then they wonder why they get some nasty side effects. Just because it's natural doesn't mean it's harmless.

The "medicine man" of the tribe had probably studied herbs his whole life, and like any doctor would have years of experience on exactly what effect each one would cause.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

pierrotlunaire0

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Re: story from the past
« Reply #17 on: May 07, 2017, 09:27:18 AM »
Very true, Twik.  Some herbs are incredibly potent and you have to know what you are doing and how to assess the herb itself.
I have enough lithium in my medicine cabinet to power three cars across a sizeable desert.  Which makes me officially...Three Cars Crazy

XRogue

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Re: story from the past
« Reply #18 on: May 07, 2017, 09:38:41 AM »
I hope I'm not breaking any rules resurrecting this thread, but I've just read it and wanted to add a story of my own.

I am British. As a child I had a German pen-friend (in fact we are still in touch 40 years on).  When this story happened, we were about 14 or 15 years old and had been writing to each other since we were 10.  Elke's father suggested that we might like to visit each other, so that summer I spent 2 weeks with her and her family and she visited us the following year.  Because of the differences in the school year, when I arrived to visit her, her school hadn't quite broken up for the summer, so I went to school with her for the first few days.  As we went into one lesson, she whispered to me that the next class was Maths, and nobody had much respect for the maths teacher, but it was the last maths lesson of the year so it couldn't be as bad as usual.  Anyway, we got seated and the teacher came in.  To my 14 year old eyes he was old (having done a quick calculation, he must have been in his late 50s).  He welcomed me as the class guest and started to tell me a story.  I had only been learning German for a few months, so I quickly lost what he was saying, but the whole class went silent and very still.  Then he gave me a single white rose, turned away very quickly and started the class as if nothing had happened.  I had to ask Elke what he said later on.  Here's the story.

When he was 16 years old he joined the army.  It was the last few months of WW2.  He was very young and very scared, but it was what he wanted and was expected to do.  After a couple of weeks of very basic training he and his fellow recruits were sent to the front line (I can't remember where it was but I did know once)  At some point he got separated from his troop and was trying to get back to them when he realised that a line of Allied soldiers were coming towards him across a field.  He hid in a ditch and tried to stay as still as possible.  The soldiers came closer and closer.  He was sure he was going to die and shut his eyes. Then he heard footsteps stop right above him. He opened his eyes and saw a soldier looking down at him.  The man said in English "You're only a kid, no older than my boy", unclipped his caddy of water from his belt, dropped it and walked on. 
He said that he always wanted to give thanks for that gesture, but had no idea how.  I was the first person from England he had met since that day so the rose was his thank you for the life he didn't expect to have.

Of course by the time I understood the story, I couldn't thank him in person, but I did write a letter that Elke gave to him the next term.

I still have the rose.

Gladly, that is *amazing*. I bet the other kids in the school liked their math teacher much more after that too.

Where *did* I put my tissues?  :D

doodlemor

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Re: story from the past
« Reply #19 on: May 07, 2017, 04:48:00 PM »
I hope I'm not breaking any rules resurrecting this thread, but I've just read it and wanted to add a story of my own.

I am British. As a child I had a German pen-friend (in fact we are still in touch 40 years on).  When this story happened, we were about 14 or 15 years old and had been writing to each other since we were 10.  Elke's father suggested that we might like to visit each other, so that summer I spent 2 weeks with her and her family and she visited us the following year.  Because of the differences in the school year, when I arrived to visit her, her school hadn't quite broken up for the summer, so I went to school with her for the first few days.  As we went into one lesson, she whispered to me that the next class was Maths, and nobody had much respect for the maths teacher, but it was the last maths lesson of the year so it couldn't be as bad as usual.  Anyway, we got seated and the teacher came in.  To my 14 year old eyes he was old (having done a quick calculation, he must have been in his late 50s).  He welcomed me as the class guest and started to tell me a story.  I had only been learning German for a few months, so I quickly lost what he was saying, but the whole class went silent and very still.  Then he gave me a single white rose, turned away very quickly and started the class as if nothing had happened.  I had to ask Elke what he said later on.  Here's the story.

When he was 16 years old he joined the army.  It was the last few months of WW2.  He was very young and very scared, but it was what he wanted and was expected to do.  After a couple of weeks of very basic training he and his fellow recruits were sent to the front line (I can't remember where it was but I did know once)  At some point he got separated from his troop and was trying to get back to them when he realised that a line of Allied soldiers were coming towards him across a field.  He hid in a ditch and tried to stay as still as possible.  The soldiers came closer and closer.  He was sure he was going to die and shut his eyes. Then he heard footsteps stop right above him. He opened his eyes and saw a soldier looking down at him.  The man said in English "You're only a kid, no older than my boy", unclipped his caddy of water from his belt, dropped it and walked on. 
He said that he always wanted to give thanks for that gesture, but had no idea how.  I was the first person from England he had met since that day so the rose was his thank you for the life he didn't expect to have.

Of course by the time I understood the story, I couldn't thank him in person, but I did write a letter that Elke gave to him the next term.

I still have the rose.

This wonderful story gave me goosebumps. 


oz diva

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Re: story from the past
« Reply #20 on: May 07, 2017, 06:06:13 PM »
Gladly your story reminds me of this beautiful story. Watch to the end. Grab a tissue.

https://youtu.be/gXGfngjmwLA

Victoria

Mustard

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Re: story from the past
« Reply #21 on: May 08, 2017, 05:33:02 AM »
Gladly your story reminds me of this beautiful story. Watch to the end. Grab a tissue.

https://youtu.be/gXGfngjmwLA

Oh my...

oz diva

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Re: story from the past
« Reply #22 on: May 08, 2017, 05:45:40 AM »
I know! Packs an emotional punch eh.

Victoria