Author Topic: Online etiquette  (Read 11284 times)

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Lisbeth

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Online etiquette
« on: February 27, 2009, 12:30:17 AM »
1.  Don't type in all caps, all bold, or all italics.  This is the online equivalent of shouting.

2.  Anything posted online is fair game for comment from any member of the public.  If you want to keep something private, keep it offline.  It is not a good idea to post anything online that you would not want your parent, partner, or employer to find.

3.  Use short paragraphs-about six sentences long.

4.  Get to the point you're trying to make by the time you get to the bottom of your comment field without having to scroll down.

5.  Don't indent paragraphs online-justify all text to the left margin (the right margin if you are typing in a language that reads from right to left).

6.  Leave a blank space between paragraphs in order to separate them for ease of reading.

7.  If it's rude offline, it's rude online.  Don't get into "flame wars." It's helpful to take a moment before responding to a post that angers or insults you, and respond in a calm manner, or simply ignore the post (not everything requires a response).  Also, be aware that not all disagreements constitute "flaming" (polite disagreements do not), and don't post inflammatory remarks prefaced with "Don't flame me for this, but..."

8. Your spelling and grammar do not have to be perfect, but you should attempt to make your post as readable and understandable as possible by proper use of commas, periods, and other punctuation. 

9.  It's rude to act as the "grammar/spelling police" of other online information.  If someone else has misspelled words or misused grammar, leave it alone unless it is your own name.

10.  Familiarize yourself with the rules and standards of a website, blog, or forum before you post there.  Obey their rules-if a post is deemed in violation of the rules, edit or delete it.

11.  When E-mailing for business purposes, include your full name, phone number, and E-mail address just as you would in a business letter.

12.  Keep attachments of a reasonable size and quantity.

13.  Avoid excessive usage of emoticons and "netspeak," especially in professional settings.  They convey a tone of informality.

14.  Do not forward jokes, political rants, spam, thoughts-for-the-day, or anything else of that nature unless you know for a fact that your recipients enjoy receiving those types of E-mails.

15.  Use BCC (blind CC) for group E-mails where everyone does not already know each other. Some people are protective of their E-mail addresses.

16.  Remember that company-issued E-mails and computers are NOT private. Do not send risque, profane, controversial, or extremely personal E-mails to work addresses.

17.  Remember that it's hard to indicate tone on the Internet.  A comment that you meant sarcastically can go right over someone's head without an indication, like emoticons or an [insert sarcasm here].

18.  Be careful with replies to E-mail.  If you do not intend for everyone who received the original E-mail to receive your response, do not click on "Reply to All" when sending the response.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2009, 06:49:33 PM by KeenReader »
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Alida

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Re: Online etiquette
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2009, 12:40:52 AM »
1.  Don't type in all caps, all bold, or all italics.  This is the online equivalent of shouting.

I wish more people understood this.  I deal with someone on a daily basis, through email, as do a number of other analysts.  Everything he sends is in caps and that is what he's known for, negatively, around our office. "You answered a question from Mr. X?  That's the shouting guy, right?"

You don't want to be known as the shouting guy or girl!

snowball's chance

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Re: Online etiquette
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2009, 09:13:38 AM »
No has to have perfect grammar or punctuation online, but be careful about run-on sentences strung together.

Ex. On the way to work I usually stop for coffee at the Starbuck's by my house unless the line is too long but yesterday there were only two others in line but the lady ahead of me was apparently ordering for her whole office don't you think they should help other people first who are just getting one drink and obviously in a hurry?

vs.

On the way to work, I usually stop for coffee at the Starbuck's by my house, unless the line is too long.  But yesterday there were only two others in line, but the lady ahead of me was apparently ordering for her whole office. Don't you think they should help other people first; who are just getting one drink, and obviously in a hurry?

It's not so much being a grammar freak, but the first paragraph can be difficult to read, because people are trained to look for commas and periods to take "a break" and process what they have read so far.  When I see posts like that online, I am likely to skip reading after a sentece or two.

Likewise, the rule ellipses don't have to be used perfectly, but too many and too often can also be annoying.

My friend has this dog . . . . . . . and he's just adorable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . but she brings him everywhere . . . . . . . . and I am worried about inviting her to my dinner party . . . . . . . . . because my husband is allergic.

Also, everyone knows multiple question marks indicate disbelief or extreme unsureness.  You can accomplish this just as well with two or three question marks as eleven, which can indicate desperation or fear.

How to I tell my son he'll have to miss hockey practice??  vs. How to I tell my son he'll have to miss hockey practice???????????????

Also, remember that it's hard to indicate tone on the internet.  A comment that you meant sarcastic or facetious can go right over someone's head w/o an indication, like emoticons or an [insert sarcasm here].

ShadesOfGrey

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Re: Online etiquette
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2009, 09:37:42 AM »
I agree with snowball - I think it can be condensed to:

2. Your spelling and grammar does not have to be perfect, but you should attempt to make your post as readable and understanable as possible with use of commas, periods, and other punctuation. 

3. Also, remember that it's hard to indicate tone on the internet.  A comment that you meant sarcastic can go right over someone's head w/o an indication, like emoticons or an [insert sarcasm here]. 

7.  If it's rude offline, it's rude online.  Don't get into "flame wars."  It's helpful to take a moment before responding to a post that angers or insults you, and respond in a calm manner, or simply ignore the post (not everything requires a response).
« Last Edit: February 27, 2009, 09:40:28 AM by Inigo Montoya »
Words mean more than what is set down on paper. It takes the human voice to infuse them with shades of deeper meaning. - Maya Angelou

I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel. - Maya Angelou

caranfin

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Re: Online etiquette
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2009, 09:41:11 AM »
I agree with snowball - I think it can be condensed to:

2. Your spelling and grammar does not have to be perfect, but you should attempt to make your post as readable and understanable as possible with use of commas, periods, and other punctuation. 

You should also attempt to use correct spelling. But you should not call out others on their grammar or spelling. (And if you do, you should note that grammar is spelled "ar," not "er.")

(sorry, Inigo, had to do it!)  :-*
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ShadesOfGrey

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Re: Online etiquette
« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2009, 09:46:59 AM »
I agree with snowball - I think it can be condensed to:

2. Your spelling and grammar does not have to be perfect, but you should attempt to make your post as readable and understanable as possible with use of commas, periods, and other punctuation. 

You should also attempt to use correct spelling. But you should not call out others on their grammar or spelling. (And if you do, you should note that grammar is spelled "ar," not "er.")

(sorry, Inigo, had to do it!)  :-*

haha -no worries. I used to have excellent typing skills (fast, accurate), unfortunately, I misspell/typo things more often than not these days! I've even noticed myself mis-using "they're" "their" and "there" online :o  ::) and I *absolutely* know the difference, and "read" things differently when they get messed up. sigh...  ;)
Words mean more than what is set down on paper. It takes the human voice to infuse them with shades of deeper meaning. - Maya Angelou

I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel. - Maya Angelou

caranfin

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Re: Online etiquette
« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2009, 09:54:04 AM »
I agree with snowball - I think it can be condensed to:

2. Your spelling and grammar does not have to be perfect, but you should attempt to make your post as readable and understanable as possible with use of commas, periods, and other punctuation. 

You should also attempt to use correct spelling. But you should not call out others on their grammar or spelling. (And if you do, you should note that grammar is spelled "ar," not "er.")

(sorry, Inigo, had to do it!)  :-*

haha -no worries. I used to have excellent typing skills (fast, accurate), unfortunately, I misspell/typo things more often than not these days! I've even noticed myself mis-using "they're" "their" and "there" online :o  ::) and I *absolutely* know the difference, and "read" things differently when they get messed up. sigh...  ;)

Isn't that funny? I do the same thing. Misplaced apostrophes too - I hate that, and yet I find myself doing it online now!
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dawbs

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Re: Online etiquette
« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2009, 10:26:36 AM »
-Know where you are on the internet/lurk before posting.

Links that sum it up well:

-http://www.albion.com/netiquette/rule3.html
-http://www.careerowlresources.ca/articles/newsgrouparticleback.htm
(scroll down to the bit on netiquette)

When you find a site that intrests you, be aware that what is perfectly acceptable on one site simply isn't done (or is seen as dreadfully rude) on another.  So lurk, read a bit (archives are great) and work to get a feel for a site before you start posting information.
Some sites allow (and encourage) off topic postings while others frown on deviation from the subject of the site.  Some allow 'salty' language and others try to keep things Safe For Work. Some expect a certain amount of 'hazing' of new posters while others welcome newbies.--Just to name a few of the many issues that can arise.



And the obvious step farther on the above is "accept a site for what it is". 

The internet is a wide, wild and wooly place and it's much better to find a site/forum/group that suits your needs/wants than to find one that doesn't and try to force it to change to your specifications.
  If you find a site which you like the topic of but you hate all of the conversational topics brought up by regular posters and their attitudes, stop and look a little farther and you're likely to find a site that better fits your wants (which incorporates the topic and an attitude you like) and spares you the rudeness of bursting into a site to tell everyone that they are wrong and your way is better.

You are unlikely to 100% agree with any site's moderation/posting choices/posters/etc but if the differences between what you want and what they provide are insurmountable, it is much more pleasant for you to find a site that works within the framework you need than they will be if you try to force an existing site to conform to your expectations (the existing site exists in part because the people there like it how it is).

FoxPaws

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Re: Online etiquette
« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2009, 10:51:59 AM »
When emailing for business purposes, include your full name, phone number, and email address just as you would in a business letter.

Keep attachments a reasonable size and quantity.

Avoid text speak unless you are actually texting. Avoid it altogether in professional settings.

Do not forward jokes, political rants, spam, thought-for-the-day, or anything else of that nature unless you know for a fact that your recipients enjoy receiving those types of emails.

Use BCC (blind CC) for group emails where everyone does not already know each other. Some people are protective of their email address.

Remember that company issued emails and computers are NOT private. Do not send risque, profane, controversial, or extremely personal emails to work addresses.
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snowball's chance

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Re: Online etiquette
« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2009, 10:56:01 AM »
When emailing for business purposes, include your full name, phone number, and email address just as you would in a business letter.

Keep attachments a reasonable size and quantity.

Avoid text speak unless you are actually texting. Avoid it altogether in professional settings.

Do not forward jokes, political rants, spam, thought-for-the-day, or anything else of that nature unless you know for a fact that your recipients enjoy receiving those types of emails.

Use BCC (blind CC) for group emails where everyone does not already know each other. Some people are protective of their email address.

Remember that company issued emails and computers are NOT private. Do not send risque, profane, controversial, or extremely personal emails to work addresses.

Decide whether it's necessary to reply to the sender or reply to all.

caranfin

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Re: Online etiquette
« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2009, 11:39:28 AM »
Don't confuse "disagreement" with "flaming." When someone politely disagrees with you, do not accuse them of flaming - it makes you look ridiculous. Also, do not post inflammatory remarks prefaced with "Don't flame me for this, but..."
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Just Lori

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Re: Online etiquette
« Reply #11 on: February 27, 2009, 11:50:30 AM »
Don't post anyone online that you wouldn't show your mother, best friend or potential employer.

caranfin

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Re: Online etiquette
« Reply #12 on: February 27, 2009, 11:53:56 AM »
Don't post anyone online that you wouldn't show your mother, best friend or potential employer.

Under your real name.

Sometimes people need to complain/get advice about their mother, best friend, or potential employer, and it's fine to do that anonymously.
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Just Lori

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Re: Online etiquette
« Reply #13 on: February 27, 2009, 01:19:48 PM »
Don't post anyone online that you wouldn't show your mother, best friend or potential employer.

Under your real name.

Sometimes people need to complain/get advice about their mother, best friend, or potential employer, and it's fine to do that anonymously.

Good point. I would still warn people to watch what they say.  Anonymity can be fleeting on the internet. 

Ehelldame

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Re: Online etiquette
« Reply #14 on: February 27, 2009, 01:56:31 PM »
1.  Don't type in all caps, all bold, or all italics.  This is the online equivalent of shouting.

2.  Anything posted online is fair game for comment from any member of the public.  If you want to keep something private, keep it offline.

3.  Use short paragraphs-about six sentences.

4.  Get to the point you're trying to make by the time you get to the bottom of your comment field without having to scroll down.

5.  Don't indent paragraphs online-justify all text to the left margin (the right margin if you are typing in a language read right to left).

6.  Leave a blank space between paragraphs.

7.  If it's rude offline, it's rude online.  Don't get into "flame wars."

Good start!   OK, Keeny, your job as OP is to edit your original post to include the good suggestions for additions until there is a final document.