Author Topic: Yet another assumption based on my appearance...  (Read 16563 times)

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Shea

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Re: Yet another assumption based on my appearance...
« Reply #30 on: July 11, 2009, 12:42:59 PM »
Would it be bad of me if I had replied to my child saying that with, "Now now, she's only a witch if she weighs the same as a duck. And I'm not stupid enough to ask a woman her weight."  ;D

No, that would make you Parent of the Year >:D.


If a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, librarians are a global threat.

CG

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Re: Yet another assumption based on my appearance...
« Reply #31 on: July 11, 2009, 04:17:21 PM »
There were, I believe, 19 or 20 people who were executed for witchcraft in the Salem frenzy of 1692.  Most were hanged; one was pressed to death by having increasingly heavy weights piled on his chest (a practice designed to force a confession, which this stubborn man--Giles Corey--refused to give).

If anyone is wondering, Giles Corey did not just refuse to give a confession; he refused to stand trial. The reason being, if he pled innocent or guilty, his land could be considered forfeit. There was more of a chance of his SILs still being able to inherit if he did not stand trial. He was pressed to death with stones as punishment for refusing. Nanner can probably explain it better than I can, but I have to admire that ornery old guy (he was 80 or so).

However, I think they're talking 'bout someone who is still alive...

Nannerdoman

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Re: Yet another assumption based on my appearance...
« Reply #32 on: July 11, 2009, 08:10:30 PM »
There were, I believe, 19 or 20 people who were executed for witchcraft in the Salem frenzy of 1692.  Most were hanged; one was pressed to death by having increasingly heavy weights piled on his chest (a practice designed to force a confession, which this stubborn man--Giles Corey--refused to give).

If anyone is wondering, Giles Corey did not just refuse to give a confession; he refused to stand trial. The reason being, if he pled innocent or guilty, his land could be considered forfeit. There was more of a chance of his SILs still being able to inherit if he did not stand trial. He was pressed to death with stones as punishment for refusing. Nanner can probably explain it better than I can, but I have to admire that ornery old guy (he was 80 or so).

However, I think they're talking 'bout someone who is still alive...

Oh.  I don't do live people, so I have no idea to whom they're referring, then.

I'm the grammarian against whom your mother warned you.

vampchick21

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Re: Yet another assumption based on my appearance...
« Reply #33 on: July 22, 2009, 07:10:39 PM »
There were, I believe, 19 or 20 people who were executed for witchcraft in the Salem frenzy of 1692.  Most were hanged; one was pressed to death by having increasingly heavy weights piled on his chest (a practice designed to force a confession, which this stubborn man--Giles Corey--refused to give).

If anyone is wondering, Giles Corey did not just refuse to give a confession; he refused to stand trial. The reason being, if he pled innocent or guilty, his land could be considered forfeit. There was more of a chance of his SILs still being able to inherit if he did not stand trial. He was pressed to death with stones as punishment for refusing. Nanner can probably explain it better than I can, but I have to admire that ornery old guy (he was 80 or so).

However, I think they're talking 'bout someone who is still alive...

Oh.  I don't do live people, so I have no idea to whom they're referring, then.



Laurie Cabot, the Officaial Witch of Salem.  She's been around for several decades and received that title from the former Gov. of Mass.  She is a High Priestess and has done a great deal of work educating the public about modern Witches and Wiccans.  She runs a Wiccan shop in Salem and is also an author.

And it sounds like the mother in the original story could use a bit of a lecture at Ms. Cabot's feet!  As well as a lecture from Miss. Manners.

Hurricane Marathon

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Re: Yet another assumption based on my appearance...
« Reply #34 on: July 22, 2009, 09:42:45 PM »
Laurie Cabot, the Officaial Witch of Salem. 

Thank you - I remember seeing a documentary but I couldn't remember her name.  :)

vampchick21

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Re: Yet another assumption based on my appearance...
« Reply #35 on: July 22, 2009, 10:18:52 PM »
No prob!  I could remember her first name, but not her last one, so I had to look it up.....lol

LovesWater

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Re: Yet another assumption based on my appearance...
« Reply #36 on: July 31, 2009, 08:20:27 PM »
Okay....who is the "Well-known Witch of Salem."

Which witch?  (I had to say it).

There were, I believe, 19 or 20 people who were executed for witchcraft in the Salem frenzy of 1692.  Most were hanged; one was pressed to death by having increasingly heavy weights piled on his chest (a practice designed to force a confession, which this stubborn man--Giles Corey--refused to give).  I'm not sure that any is better known than any other, unless perhaps it's Rebecca Nurse.  She was an old woman of such remarkable piety that the panic increased exponentially when she was accused, because if Goodwife Nurse could be a witch--well, then anyone could!

The persons who confessed to witchcraft were spared.  Those who maintained their innocence were hanged.  It wasn't a matter of "innocent until proven guilty", but of "innocent until proven accused".

Yes, I've read a lot about the matter.



I thought the most famous was Susannah Martin - but, as it turns out, the OP was indeed referring to someone alive! Thank you to vampchick21 for answering the question - I was very curious!

BettyDraper

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Re: Yet another assumption based on my appearance...
« Reply #37 on: July 31, 2009, 08:31:05 PM »
OP, I think your ensemble sounds chic and lovely; the mother and child were crackpots.  Don't let them get you down.

And your Wizard of Oz quotation made me laugh out loud!   :)

OT but = About 15 years ago I visited Salem and was purchasing some charms in a witchcraft-oriented gift shoppe -- the young man at the register was rather snippy and I retorted in kind.  Ten minutes later approaching my rental car I stumbled over something, made a few flying leaps across the parking lot and landed face down, skinning my left knee rather badly.  Coincidence?  I think not.    ;)

Sirius

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Re: Yet another assumption based on my appearance...
« Reply #38 on: August 15, 2009, 01:57:55 PM »
Hey, I have a moonstone necklace...and I'm a 50-yo redhead who's majestic-sized.  I also have a moonstone ring, and I love them both because they're beautiful.  The ring has veins of cobalt blue in the right lighting, and the necklace, which I wear on a long silver chain, makes a ringing sound when I tap on it.  If I saw someone wearing a moonstone as the OP described, I'd be oohing and aahing over it.  It sounds beautiful.

claddagh lass

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Re: Yet another assumption based on my appearance...
« Reply #39 on: September 29, 2009, 09:07:30 PM »
I have a moonstone ring.  I am quite fond of the moonstone.

One time for Halloween I went outside wearing a black dress with my hair pinned up.  I have naturally pale skin and walked by a woman with her daughter.

The little girl exclaimed, "Mommy!  Mommy!  There's a new witch here!"

The mother shook her head and it took all that I had to keep from laughing.