Author Topic: Public Transportation  (Read 31339 times)

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kareng57

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Re: Public Transportation
« Reply #30 on: March 09, 2009, 10:13:37 PM »
Yup, that's another one. That's what the storage compartments are for. If I have 1 bag I might place it on the empty seat next to me. If the bus is filling up I just put it on my lap.

I once witnessed a bus driver that made an assumption about boarding passengers. I lived in a tourist area and there was one bus that went into the main city and another that went to the beach. A family of tourists got on and the driver SHOUTED 'This is NOT going to the BEACH. The bus for the BEACH is the number 6!' They wanted to go to the main city for shopping. For one, they weren't wearing beach stuff or carrying beach items, and two, it was raining that day..so why would he assume that to begin with?



Frustration, probably?  Not to excuse his exclamation at all, but maybe he'd had it up-to-here with tourists who'd get on the wrong bus, realize it a half-hour later, and then act as though it was his fault?  I too agree about people who expect a transit-driver to be a transit guide-book.  No - the bus driver does not automatically know when the 288 bus is coming next.  He/she is likely very professional and experienced, but does not have a computer for a memory.  Even when they're very patient - a passenger with multiple questions can put the bus two or three minutes behind schedule.  That can be enough for some fellow-passengers to miss their connections, and they will not be happy.  Most municipal transit systems have websites, along with print-schedules that are usually available at places such as libraries.

My beef?  There have been a couple of mentions about when someone is in the inside-seat and has to exit. Sometimes I politely say "excuse me, I get off here" - and the outside-person wordlessly manages to shift-her-knees to the outside about 20 degrees.  Uh - that's not going to do it.  While I wouldn't call myself a large person, I'm not small either.  Honestly - can't you stand up for a few seconds, if necessary?

Germane Jackson

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Re: Public Transportation
« Reply #31 on: March 09, 2009, 10:36:09 PM »
The bus driver could have been having a bad day and running way behind schedule due to people boarding the wrong bus or asking him the wrong questions or attempting to pay their busfare with a €50 note. I was thinking it was just that he hated tourists getting on his bus instead of boarding the one that went to the beach because when I got on the bus he was polite to me.

snowball's chance

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Re: Public Transportation
« Reply #32 on: March 09, 2009, 10:48:11 PM »
My beef?  There have been a couple of mentions about when someone is in the inside-seat and has to exit. Sometimes I politely say "excuse me, I get off here" - and the outside-person wordlessly manages to shift-her-knees to the outside about 20 degrees.  Uh - that's not going to do it.  While I wouldn't call myself a large person, I'm not small either.  Honestly - can't you stand up for a few seconds, if necessary?

Even worse when accompanied by an annoyed look.

camlan

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Re: Public Transportation
« Reply #33 on: March 09, 2009, 11:18:54 PM »

My beef?  There have been a couple of mentions about when someone is in the inside-seat and has to exit. Sometimes I politely say "excuse me, I get off here" - and the outside-person wordlessly manages to shift-her-knees to the outside about 20 degrees.  Uh - that's not going to do it.  While I wouldn't call myself a large person, I'm not small either.  Honestly - can't you stand up for a few seconds, if necessary?

I've been on buses that were so crowded with people standing that it would be hard for the person on the outside seat to stand up--there would be no room for them. But if the aisle is clear, the outside person should make adequate room for the inside person to exit.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Miss Vertigo

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Re: Public Transportation
« Reply #34 on: March 10, 2009, 04:36:27 AM »
I really have hesitated in posting this. It's absolutely not anti-child, and I remember such a topic getting quite heated on a previous thread. But it's very pertinent to public transport etiquette, and something that we run across an awful lot in London, so I'd imagine it applies elsewhere in other big cities.

If you must take a pram or puschair onto the bus during morning or evening rush hour, please park it in the designated area.  Neatly. With the whole pram inside the space. Don't leave half of it poking out into the aisle and then tut when people find they can't get past it to get off.  They are not being awkward; you are creating a bottleneck. London buses work a particular way: in at the front doors, out of the back doors, and if anything impedes this flow of passengers, chaos ensues.

This is for your baby's sake as well as for that of the other passengers; if it's not in the space, it will get bumped as people try and get past it in the already very narrow space to keep the system 'flowing'.

If there is already a passenger with a pram, or a wheelchair user (the space is interchangable) in the designated space, please, please wait for the next bus to come along instead of trying to crowbar your way onto the already-packed bus with it. Nobody who gets on after you will be able to get off if you stand in the aisle with it. Nobody will be able to get past you to use the stairs to get a seat if there are any up there.

This is possibly my biggest pet peeve about bus travel. It may work differently in other parts of the world, but in London at least, where generally there isn't room to maneuver on a bus anyway, this is a real problem.

Ferrets

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Re: Public Transportation
« Reply #35 on: March 10, 2009, 07:17:52 AM »
Do not play music without headphones on. Please.

Keep a check on your language. Whilst bad language doesn't really bother me, and I am not going to be remotely fussed by the odd swearword, nevertheless a steady, loud stream of constant profanity (not to mention vulgarity) is not at all pleasant for other people to listen to.

If you have a child with you, don't allow them to press the bell repeatedly. Once is enough: it's not a toy. (Most people with children who let them press the bell are actually really good about this, and I realise that sometimes kids will manage to sneak in an extra couple of prods against one's best efforts, but I'm talking about those who indulgently allow the constant ding-ding-ding, and those who even encourage it.)

It is not cute to sit in the luggage rack when there are seats available. (You shouldn't really do it at all, but someone perched on there when the bus is chock-full doesn't bother me - so long as they shift if another passenger wants to put luggage there.)

You'd think all these would go without saying, wouldn't you? ::)

(Hrumph. I was up at the local school again this morning to complain about a solid twenty minutes of screamed [yes, full-volume, top-of-the-lungs screamed] vulgarity and profanity from certain of their pupils on the [public] bus I catch for work, and am therefore feeling a little raw about the subject. :P)

snoopygirl

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Re: Public Transportation
« Reply #36 on: March 10, 2009, 04:15:09 PM »
On our buses ( not sure how it is in other parts of the world) there is one set of doors. It is expected that the people getting off the bus get off first before those getting on get on. When I am trying to get off the bus do not get on until I am off. Most of the time I am pushed. I have balance issues. The last thing I need to do is trip getting off the bus.

jane7166

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Re: Public Transportation
« Reply #37 on: March 10, 2009, 08:31:07 PM »
Do not engage in public arguments and, if you are a child or teenager, do not whine!

I don't really get to ride the bus that much but we were at Big Mouse Land once, taking the bus back to the hotel, and this kinda upscale looking family of five was the only other group on the bus. 

Teenage daughter was asking Dad to do something and he said no.  Teenage daughter then began to WHIIINNNEE and the Dad kept egging her on with more nos but not telling her to can it.  She kept it up for several miles until she and Dad caught a look I gave them along with a deep sigh which, I hope, was portraying the utter disgust I was feeling towards them.  She shut up and the rest of the ride was peaceful. 

snowball's chance

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Re: Public Transportation
« Reply #38 on: March 11, 2009, 10:28:46 AM »
I really have hesitated in posting this. It's absolutely not anti-child, and I remember such a topic getting quite heated on a previous thread. But it's very pertinent to public transport etiquette, and something that we run across an awful lot in London, so I'd imagine it applies elsewhere in other big cities.

If you must take a pram or puschair onto the bus during morning or evening rush hour, please park it in the designated area.  Neatly. With the whole pram inside the space. Don't leave half of it poking out into the aisle and then tut when people find they can't get past it to get off.  They are not being awkward; you are creating a bottleneck. London buses work a particular way: in at the front doors, out of the back doors, and if anything impedes this flow of passengers, chaos ensues.

This is for your baby's sake as well as for that of the other passengers; if it's not in the space, it will get bumped as people try and get past it in the already very narrow space to keep the system 'flowing'.

If there is already a passenger with a pram, or a wheelchair user (the space is interchangable) in the designated space, please, please wait for the next bus to come along instead of trying to crowbar your way onto the already-packed bus with it. Nobody who gets on after you will be able to get off if you stand in the aisle with it. Nobody will be able to get past you to use the stairs to get a seat if there are any up there.

This is possibly my biggest pet peeve about bus travel. It may work differently in other parts of the world, but in London at least, where generally there isn't room to maneuver on a bus anyway, this is a real problem.

My transit authority requires that strollers/prams be folded up and the baby/child held in your lap (so the stroller doesn't strat rolling around or tip over if the bus brakes suddenly).  However, the only time I saw a bus driver try to enforce this, the woman w/ the stroller started yelling & swearing at him.

Miss Vertigo

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Re: Public Transportation
« Reply #39 on: March 11, 2009, 11:53:48 AM »
My transit authority requires that strollers/prams be folded up and the baby/child held in your lap (so the stroller doesn't strat rolling around or tip over if the bus brakes suddenly).  However, the only time I saw a bus driver try to enforce this, the woman w/ the stroller started yelling & swearing at him.

That's a great idea if it works in your (you general, not you-you) particular area; sadly it'd never work in London, I don't think. There just isn't room - the chance of the mother finding a seat in which to sit with the child on her lap are minimal at best - or time for someone to juggle the baby/fold up the stroller while everyone else is piling onto the bus. I guess that's why we have the area to park them in.

I've seen strollers tip over on buses, but it's usually when the mother's got a load of shopping hanging off the handles.

familyfun

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Re: Public Transportation
« Reply #40 on: March 11, 2009, 01:02:39 PM »
Maybe I'm cynical, living in Chicago, but I can only imagine saying "may I?", and being told "no."  Then what?  I'll say excuse me if someone has their bag on a seat, but otherwise, I find that it's best and safest to keep to myself.

I can see your point; however, I also live in Chicago (hi neighbor!) and have never had anyone refuse me when I've asked to sit down.  If someone is sitting in the window seat, and the aisle seat is open, I will just sit down.  However, if they're sitting in the aisle seat while the window seat is vacant (which totally ticks me off, by the way) I'll smile and say "excuse me, can I sit down?"  Same thing if they have their bag in the seat next to them.

People get away with being rude only as long as you let them.  There's nothing wrong with reminding people, via a polite request, that the bus or the El is a shared space. 

I think it's ok to take an aisle seat to avoid getting squished, but then there's a responsibility to be alert and pay attention to see if anyone else needs the window seat.  They shouldn't have to ask to get into it. 

From my own experience, I tend to get on fairly early at both points of my commute (they're express buses, which are desinged like coach type buses).  I used to take the window seat.  But after being repeatedly squished by people who had room to spare in the aisle (no standees), I've started taking the aisle seat.  Just because being squished in with one quarter to one third of my seat space infringed upon with a bag in my lap & the seat in front of me being reclined was enough to make me start thinking murderous thoughts.  I usually head all the way towards the back (which only fills up if the bus gets more crowded than usual).  If for some reason I can't, I take an aisle seat.  But I make it a point to be aware if the bus is filling up (I don't listen to music, etc. during this time because I tend to zone out when I do).  And I offer the window seat to anyone I see making their way back towards my area.  Usually via eye contact and standing up and/or motioning to the seat & saying, "would you like to sit here".

camlan

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Re: Public Transportation
« Reply #41 on: March 11, 2009, 01:09:14 PM »
If I have only a few stops left, I'll stay in the aisle seat, rather than move over and be blocked in when it's time for me to get off, which would require making the person in the aisle seat to stand up to let me out. If I've got a long way to go, I'll move over to the window seat.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Venus193

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Re: Public Transportation
« Reply #42 on: March 11, 2009, 01:41:48 PM »
If you are wearing a backpack, please take it off and carry it on if the bus or train is crowded.  It is very rude and even dangerous to wear it and make a sudden move near a passenger who can easily get smacked in the face with it.

TheaterDiva1

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Re: Public Transportation
« Reply #43 on: March 11, 2009, 02:18:39 PM »
Plan your trip ahead of time!!  Figure out where you are going, where you need to get off, where/when/if you need a transfer ahead of time.  Most transit authorities have this info available online and by phone.  My transit authority has a service that will walk you through planning your trip by phone.

And don't hold up the rest of the train trying to figure it out.  I'm referring to the group of bratty teens who suddenly couldn't remember if they had to get off at a particular stop, so three of them ran out to the platform to check the map while the other two stood in the open doorway to hold the train for them.  This went on for several minutes until another passenger pointed out that they were holding everyone up.  Please, if you don't know where you're going, ask someone, or EVERYONE get off and check the map and take the next train if necessary (or check the map in the car).  Don't make us pay the price for your lack of preparation!

And while I'm at it, a moving subway car is no place for cheerleading practice.  Yes, I'm referring to the same group.  Not only was the shouting and chanting annoying, but the pyramids and shoulder stands were dangerous.  Yes, they were doing all that.

snowball's chance

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Re: Public Transportation
« Reply #44 on: March 13, 2009, 02:58:52 PM »
Motorists: Be very careful about switching lanes in front of a bus, especially on the highway.  If you cut the bus off, every passenger on the bus can get thrown forward if the bus driver has to slam on the breaks.