Author Topic: Restaurant etiquette  (Read 46253 times)

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a

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Re: Restaurant etiquette
« Reply #60 on: September 15, 2011, 05:52:07 AM »
I know this thread is old, but Iím amazed that someone in the UK would tip 20% as standard. That would make for a very good salary for waitresses/waiters in restaurants I typically frequent.
Hourly wage: approx £6 (minimum).

For a normal weekday meal (which means weíd spend 1.5 hours tops in the restaurant) Iíd pay around £30 for 2 people. This includes a main each (say £7-9 each), one or possibly two starters (£3-5 each), two or possibly three drinks (£3-5 each).
If we paid a 20% tip itíd be £6. The person serving us would have at least 2 other tables (normally more but Iím being very conservative) to serve. If they eat as little/much as us and spends as much time, this waiter would take home £14 per hour with an extremely conservative estimate Ė probably more.

If I estimate 3 tables, one of which with 4 people instead of 2, and eating 25% more the hourly take home would be £23).
Maybe Iím not getting it but that is more than many graduates get, and they would pay tax on it.

I guess Iím just happy I live in a country where people donít have to depend on other peopleís goodwill to pay their bills/that I donít ever have to tip if I donít want to and nobody can say anything about it.

DuBois

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Re: Restaurant etiquette
« Reply #61 on: September 15, 2011, 06:44:07 AM »
I know this thread is old, but Iím amazed that someone in the UK would tip 20% as standard. That would make for a very good salary for waitresses/waiters in restaurants I typically frequent.
Hourly wage: approx £6 (minimum).

For a normal weekday meal (which means weíd spend 1.5 hours tops in the restaurant) Iíd pay around £30 for 2 people. This includes a main each (say £7-9 each), one or possibly two starters (£3-5 each), two or possibly three drinks (£3-5 each).
If we paid a 20% tip itíd be £6. The person serving us would have at least 2 other tables (normally more but Iím being very conservative) to serve. If they eat as little/much as us and spends as much time, this waiter would take home £14 per hour with an extremely conservative estimate Ė probably more.

If I estimate 3 tables, one of which with 4 people instead of 2, and eating 25% more the hourly take home would be £23).
Maybe Iím not getting it but that is more than many graduates get, and they would pay tax on it.

I guess Iím just happy I live in a country where people donít have to depend on other peopleís goodwill to pay their bills/that I donít ever have to tip if I donít want to and nobody can say anything about it.

Preach it! I actually wouldn't want to eat out in the US, because what would happen if I was unhappy with service? Would I still have to tip? I wouldn't want to, but might have to because of societal pressure. I also agree about the point about graduates. I am currently working towards a degree. I get some grant aid, and some achievement based bursaries.  I also work as a cleaner, for a modest sum. I would not expect to make big money working at a job that does not require a degree. If I did, I wouldn't be working toward a degree!

Wonderflonium

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Re: Restaurant etiquette
« Reply #62 on: September 15, 2011, 08:49:54 AM »
2) Don't upsell me. I know what I wanted to order, and you trying to make money for the restaurant doesn't go over well. I'm in the UK, so it isn't to increase tips that they do this, but it's still annoying.

Often, the server doesn't have a choice. It's part of the job, and if (s)he doesn't do it and a secret shopper is watching, (s)he will be in trouble.
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DuBois

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Re: Restaurant etiquette
« Reply #63 on: September 15, 2011, 09:01:09 AM »
2) Don't upsell me. I know what I wanted to order, and you trying to make money for the restaurant doesn't go over well. I'm in the UK, so it isn't to increase tips that they do this, but it's still annoying.

Often, the server doesn't have a choice. It's part of the job, and if (s)he doesn't do it and a secret shopper is watching, (s)he will be in trouble.

Yeah, it's a dilemma. But it is still very annoying if done agressively.

dks64

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Re: Restaurant etiquette
« Reply #64 on: September 15, 2011, 12:47:27 PM »
2) Don't upsell me. I know what I wanted to order, and you trying to make money for the restaurant doesn't go over well. I'm in the UK, so it isn't to increase tips that they do this, but it's still annoying.

Often, the server doesn't have a choice. It's part of the job, and if (s)he doesn't do it and a secret shopper is watching, (s)he will be in trouble.

Exactly. And you'd actually be surprised at how many people take you up on the upsell offer. "Would you like to add a soup or a salad for $2.95 more?" "Yes! That sounds great."

567Kate

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Re: Restaurant etiquette
« Reply #65 on: September 15, 2011, 12:53:36 PM »
On a related note, I don't know that it's etiquette, really, but I wish restaurants would at least offer water now, when taking drink orders.  I can understand why it's not brought out automatically anymore (I'm sure it's a waste of time and water), but I don't like having to remember to ask every time, especially when I order something that's more fun drink than refreshing drink (like a glass of wine or a pina colada or something, instead of a Coke).  It seems like it would be more efficient to make it part of the "Can I get anyone a drink?" speech.

In areas with a drought, this is often policy not to offer water, only to bring it when asked. I was recently in Vegas and the waiter couldn't even let one person order water for the table: he needed to hear everyone say that they wanted it.

dks64

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Re: Restaurant etiquette
« Reply #66 on: September 15, 2011, 12:59:50 PM »
I get that a lot, people ordering water for everyone, and then 95% of it doesn't even get touched. It's a waste of water in the cup, dishwashing water, straws, and time to clear the table. I'm an environmentalist, so seeing it drives me crazy  :P Most people just don't drink water, which is weird to me because I LOVE water. It's my favorite drink  ;D

violinp

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Re: Restaurant etiquette
« Reply #67 on: September 15, 2011, 01:22:50 PM »
I know this thread is old, but Iím amazed that someone in the UK would tip 20% as standard. That would make for a very good salary for waitresses/waiters in restaurants I typically frequent.
Hourly wage: approx £6 (minimum).

For a normal weekday meal (which means weíd spend 1.5 hours tops in the restaurant) Iíd pay around £30 for 2 people. This includes a main each (say £7-9 each), one or possibly two starters (£3-5 each), two or possibly three drinks (£3-5 each).
If we paid a 20% tip itíd be £6. The person serving us would have at least 2 other tables (normally more but Iím being very conservative) to serve. If they eat as little/much as us and spends as much time, this waiter would take home £14 per hour with an extremely conservative estimate Ė probably more.

If I estimate 3 tables, one of which with 4 people instead of 2, and eating 25% more the hourly take home would be £23).
Maybe Iím not getting it but that is more than many graduates get, and they would pay tax on it.

I guess Iím just happy I live in a country where people donít have to depend on other peopleís goodwill to pay their bills/that I donít ever have to tip if I donít want to and nobody can say anything about it.

Preach it! I actually wouldn't want to eat out in the US, because what would happen if I was unhappy with service? Would I still have to tip? I wouldn't want to, but might have to because of societal pressure. I also agree about the point about graduates. I am currently working towards a degree. I get some grant aid, and some achievement based bursaries.  I also work as a cleaner, for a modest sum. I would not expect to make big money working at a job that does not require a degree. If I did, I wouldn't be working toward a degree!

Gahr, usually, if the service is atrocious, I'd tip 10 percent. 15 is normal, and 20 is for excellent. Now, I can think of times I wouldn't tip, but those instances would be so egregious that I'd be calling a manager and a lawyer at the same time.
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


RainhaDoTexugo

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Re: Restaurant etiquette
« Reply #68 on: September 15, 2011, 02:40:35 PM »
On a related note, I don't know that it's etiquette, really, but I wish restaurants would at least offer water now, when taking drink orders.  I can understand why it's not brought out automatically anymore (I'm sure it's a waste of time and water), but I don't like having to remember to ask every time, especially when I order something that's more fun drink than refreshing drink (like a glass of wine or a pina colada or something, instead of a Coke).  It seems like it would be more efficient to make it part of the "Can I get anyone a drink?" speech.

In areas with a drought, this is often policy not to offer water, only to bring it when asked. I was recently in Vegas and the waiter couldn't even let one person order water for the table: he needed to hear everyone say that they wanted it.

That makes perfect sense somewhere like Vegas.  I live in Chicago, though!  We have a whole giant lake at our disposal.  I don't mind that it isn't brought automatically, but I do wish it was offered, because I grew up with it being brought automatically, and it's hard to get my mind to readjust to having to ask for it :P

DuBois

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Re: Restaurant etiquette
« Reply #69 on: September 15, 2011, 02:52:52 PM »
I know this thread is old, but Iím amazed that someone in the UK would tip 20% as standard. That would make for a very good salary for waitresses/waiters in restaurants I typically frequent.
Hourly wage: approx £6 (minimum).

For a normal weekday meal (which means weíd spend 1.5 hours tops in the restaurant) Iíd pay around £30 for 2 people. This includes a main each (say £7-9 each), one or possibly two starters (£3-5 each), two or possibly three drinks (£3-5 each).
If we paid a 20% tip itíd be £6. The person serving us would have at least 2 other tables (normally more but Iím being very conservative) to serve. If they eat as little/much as us and spends as much time, this waiter would take home £14 per hour with an extremely conservative estimate Ė probably more.

If I estimate 3 tables, one of which with 4 people instead of 2, and eating 25% more the hourly take home would be £23).
Maybe Iím not getting it but that is more than many graduates get, and they would pay tax on it.

I guess Iím just happy I live in a country where people donít have to depend on other peopleís goodwill to pay their bills/that I donít ever have to tip if I donít want to and nobody can say anything about it.

Preach it! I actually wouldn't want to eat out in the US, because what would happen if I was unhappy with service? Would I still have to tip? I wouldn't want to, but might have to because of societal pressure. I also agree about the point about graduates. I am currently working towards a degree. I get some grant aid, and some achievement based bursaries.  I also work as a cleaner, for a modest sum. I would not expect to make big money working at a job that does not require a degree. If I did, I wouldn't be working toward a degree!

Gahr, usually, if the service is atrocious, I'd tip 10 percent. 15 is normal, and 20 is for excellent. Now, I can think of times I wouldn't tip, but those instances would be so egregious that I'd be calling a manager and a lawyer at the same time.

Yeah, I guess that that's where the cognitive dissonance comes in for me. I couldn't tip 10% for atrocious service, as in rude, inattentive, lazy, something like that. Even if that was epected, it would just seem like rewarding a bad job.

WhiteTigerCub

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Re: Restaurant etiquette
« Reply #70 on: September 15, 2011, 02:58:13 PM »
Yeah, I guess that that's where the cognitive dissonance comes in for me. I couldn't tip 10% for atrocious service, as in rude, inattentive, lazy, something like that. Even if that was epected, it would just seem like rewarding a bad job.

Actually it's not though because the server pays income taxes at 15% of their tips total at the end of the year.

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DuBois

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Re: Restaurant etiquette
« Reply #71 on: September 15, 2011, 03:05:23 PM »
Yeah, I guess that that's where the cognitive dissonance comes in for me. I couldn't tip 10% for atrocious service, as in rude, inattentive, lazy, something like that. Even if that was epected, it would just seem like rewarding a bad job.

Actually it's not though because the server pays income taxes at 15% of their tips total at the end of the year.


I had thought that servers were taxed on 8% tips. But either way, if service is really, really bad, then presumably the server is in the wrong job. I'm not talking about just being a bit slow, I mean rude or totally forgetting food, that kind of thing.

Dindrane

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Re: Restaurant etiquette
« Reply #72 on: September 16, 2011, 12:07:31 AM »
In my opinion, it is appropriate to speak with a manager if you (in general) don't wish to leave a tip.  It gives the restaurant an opportunity to address your complaint, and if nothing else, makes it clear to them that your not leaving a tip is intentional and not an oversight.

If the service is not great, but it's not bad enough to speak to a manager, I personally just calculate 15% down to the last penny and forget about it.  My time is worth more than the money at that point, since I'm not willing to do anything to "fix" it.


lollylegs

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Re: Restaurant etiquette
« Reply #73 on: September 16, 2011, 12:45:22 AM »
In my opinion, it is appropriate to speak with a manager if you (in general) don't wish to leave a tip.  It gives the restaurant an opportunity to address your complaint, and if nothing else, makes it clear to them that your not leaving a tip is intentional and not an oversight.

I imagine the feedback would also give the server the opportunity to improve his/her service.

stargazer

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Re: Restaurant etiquette
« Reply #74 on: September 17, 2011, 02:11:02 PM »
1.  Tips are part of the cost of your meal in the US.  In most places, the tip should be 15%; in places with higher costs of living, like New York City and San Francisco, they go higher.  If the meal and service are adequate, not to tip is very rude.  However, a tip may be adjusted downward when service is inadequate.


I haven't read the entire thread (one of my own pet peves, sorry) but I disagree with the SF one.  Reason being it is part of CA and here servers must be paid minimum wage outside of tips (there are a few states with this law), not 2.30 per hour or other numbers I've heard in other states.  I still tip, and probably overtip in most cases, but there is no need to go higher in SF unless you want to.  You'll already be paying more for your meal so the tip will automatically be higher and their minimum wage is the highest in the US.

http://www.minimum-wage.org/states.asp?state=California
California has one of the highest state minimum wage rates, and the San Francisco minimum wage of $9.92 per hour is the highest minimum wage in the United States. Unlike many other states, tipped employees in California are also entitled to the full minimum wage of $8.00 per hour.