Author Topic: Pregnancy/birth etiquette  (Read 59531 times)

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Auntie Mame

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Re: Pregnancy/birth etiquette
« Reply #135 on: February 03, 2012, 03:46:15 PM »
5.  Only the mother gets to decide whom she wants to attend the delivery in the delivery room.  The parents jointly get to decide who can come to the hospital. Grandparents, in-laws, and other relatives and friends do not have an automatic right to be present-regardless of the fact that a new member of their family is about to be born. 

Would love to hear thoughts on this; I know two women who didn't want the father of the child in the delivery room (in both cases it was the woman's husband, ie attentive partners, not deadbeat or absent fathers). One of them changed her mind, but the other stood firm and her husband had to wait outside. So. Do attentive partners have a right to be in the delivery room?

No.  No one has the right to be present at a medical procedure except the patient and the professional of choice.  That said, I can't imagine NOT wanting my DH to be there...

I wouldn't judge her too quickly.  He may have be a loving, attentive father and husband, but that doesn't mean he's good in a crisis.  Some men simply can not deal with the stress of watching their wife deliver (no judgement on the, I'm sure it's pretty scary) and end up being more of a hindrance than a help.  A woman in labor does have the time or energy to comfort anyone, and the medical staff should be focused on her, not an hysterical husband.

Just a different perspective.
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katycoo

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Re: Pregnancy/birth etiquette
« Reply #136 on: February 06, 2012, 03:39:33 AM »
5.  Only the mother gets to decide whom she wants to attend the delivery in the delivery room.  The parents jointly get to decide who can come to the hospital. Grandparents, in-laws, and other relatives and friends do not have an automatic right to be present-regardless of the fact that a new member of their family is about to be born. 

Would love to hear thoughts on this; I know two women who didn't want the father of the child in the delivery room (in both cases it was the woman's husband, ie attentive partners, not deadbeat or absent fathers). One of them changed her mind, but the other stood firm and her husband had to wait outside. So. Do attentive partners have a right to be in the delivery room?

No.  No one has the right to be present at a medical procedure except the patient and the professional of choice.  That said, I can't imagine NOT wanting my DH to be there...

I wouldn't judge her too quickly.  He may have be a loving, attentive father and husband, but that doesn't mean he's good in a crisis.  Some men simply can not deal with the stress of watching their wife deliver (no judgement on the, I'm sure it's pretty scary) and end up being more of a hindrance than a help.  A woman in labor does have the time or energy to comfort anyone, and the medical staff should be focused on her, not an hysterical husband.

Just a different perspective.

Judge?  Was that directed at me?
I was merely stating a thought relative to my own marriage, not that I couldn't fathom any circumstance ever where a father's presence may be unwanted.

lollylegs

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Re: Pregnancy/birth etiquette
« Reply #137 on: February 06, 2012, 05:09:28 AM »
5.  Only the mother gets to decide whom she wants to attend the delivery in the delivery room.  The parents jointly get to decide who can come to the hospital. Grandparents, in-laws, and other relatives and friends do not have an automatic right to be present-regardless of the fact that a new member of their family is about to be born. 

Would love to hear thoughts on this; I know two women who didn't want the father of the child in the delivery room (in both cases it was the woman's husband, ie attentive partners, not deadbeat or absent fathers). One of them changed her mind, but the other stood firm and her husband had to wait outside. So. Do attentive partners have a right to be in the delivery room?

No.  No one has the right to be present at a medical procedure except the patient and the professional of choice.  That said, I can't imagine NOT wanting my DH to be there...

I wouldn't judge her too quickly.  He may have be a loving, attentive father and husband, but that doesn't mean he's good in a crisis.  Some men simply can not deal with the stress of watching their wife deliver (no judgement on the, I'm sure it's pretty scary) and end up being more of a hindrance than a help.  A woman in labor does have the time or energy to comfort anyone, and the medical staff should be focused on her, not an hysterical husband.

Just a different perspective.

Judge?  Was that directed at me?
I was merely stating a thought relative to my own marriage, not that I couldn't fathom any circumstance ever where a father's presence may be unwanted.

And if it was directed at me, I don't judge her at all. I've given birth myself and no way was anyone coming in that room without my say so. However, my heart absolutely broke for the father who so desperately wanted to be there for the birth of his daughter and couldn't. It's a tricky one, that's why I was interested in hearing other peoples opinions.

Auntie Mame

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Re: Pregnancy/birth etiquette
« Reply #138 on: February 06, 2012, 11:41:45 AM »
5.  Only the mother gets to decide whom she wants to attend the delivery in the delivery room.  The parents jointly get to decide who can come to the hospital. Grandparents, in-laws, and other relatives and friends do not have an automatic right to be present-regardless of the fact that a new member of their family is about to be born. 

Would love to hear thoughts on this; I know two women who didn't want the father of the child in the delivery room (in both cases it was the woman's husband, ie attentive partners, not deadbeat or absent fathers). One of them changed her mind, but the other stood firm and her husband had to wait outside. So. Do attentive partners have a right to be in the delivery room?

No.  No one has the right to be present at a medical procedure except the patient and the professional of choice.  That said, I can't imagine NOT wanting my DH to be there...

I wouldn't judge her too quickly.  He may have be a loving, attentive father and husband, but that doesn't mean he's good in a crisis.  Some men simply can not deal with the stress of watching their wife deliver (no judgement on the, I'm sure it's pretty scary) and end up being more of a hindrance than a help.  A woman in labor does have the time or energy to comfort anyone, and the medical staff should be focused on her, not an hysterical husband.

Just a different perspective.

Judge?  Was that directed at me?
I was merely stating a thought relative to my own marriage, not that I couldn't fathom any circumstance ever where a father's presence may be unwanted.

And if it was directed at me, I don't judge her at all. I've given birth myself and no way was anyone coming in that room without my say so. However, my heart absolutely broke for the father who so desperately wanted to be there for the birth of his daughter and couldn't. It's a tricky one, that's why I was interested in hearing other peoples opinions.

WOAH! Just offering another perspective.  Defensiveness not necessary.
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lollylegs

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Re: Pregnancy/birth etiquette
« Reply #139 on: February 06, 2012, 11:35:17 PM »
5.  Only the mother gets to decide whom she wants to attend the delivery in the delivery room.  The parents jointly get to decide who can come to the hospital. Grandparents, in-laws, and other relatives and friends do not have an automatic right to be present-regardless of the fact that a new member of their family is about to be born. 

Would love to hear thoughts on this; I know two women who didn't want the father of the child in the delivery room (in both cases it was the woman's husband, ie attentive partners, not deadbeat or absent fathers). One of them changed her mind, but the other stood firm and her husband had to wait outside. So. Do attentive partners have a right to be in the delivery room?

No.  No one has the right to be present at a medical procedure except the patient and the professional of choice.  That said, I can't imagine NOT wanting my DH to be there...

I wouldn't judge her too quickly.  He may have be a loving, attentive father and husband, but that doesn't mean he's good in a crisis.  Some men simply can not deal with the stress of watching their wife deliver (no judgement on the, I'm sure it's pretty scary) and end up being more of a hindrance than a help.  A woman in labor does have the time or energy to comfort anyone, and the medical staff should be focused on her, not an hysterical husband.

Just a different perspective.

Judge?  Was that directed at me?
I was merely stating a thought relative to my own marriage, not that I couldn't fathom any circumstance ever where a father's presence may be unwanted.

And if it was directed at me, I don't judge her at all. I've given birth myself and no way was anyone coming in that room without my say so. However, my heart absolutely broke for the father who so desperately wanted to be there for the birth of his daughter and couldn't. It's a tricky one, that's why I was interested in hearing other peoples opinions.

WOAH! Just offering another perspective.  Defensiveness not necessary.

Sorry, I wasn't getting defensive, although I can see how it reads that way. Just responding to your comment, and thought I was being clever by repeating the poster before me.

hobish

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Re: Pregnancy/birth etiquette
« Reply #140 on: February 07, 2012, 10:45:58 AM »

I don’t think it is etiquette’s business to decide who gets to decide who is in the room at that point. If ever there was a personal moment that is it.

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Fer

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Re: Pregnancy/birth etiquette
« Reply #141 on: February 20, 2012, 05:46:19 PM »
I have another one to add, if I may:

If you (or somebody close to you) had a blissfully easy pregnancy and were fit and active right up until the day you delivered, that's wonderful.  But don't throw that experience in the face of others who may be ill, exhausted, etc.  Every pregnancy is different, and those stories/attitudes can make the newly expectant mother feel even worse than she already does.

==

I'm 8 weeks into my first pregnancy, tired and sick, and strangely hearing stories about my dear MiL working on the farm and chopping wood right up until she went into labour doesn't make me feel better.  Funny that...   ::)

MrsJWine

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Re: Pregnancy/birth etiquette
« Reply #142 on: February 20, 2012, 05:52:17 PM »
I'm 8 weeks into my first pregnancy, tired and sick, and strangely hearing stories about my dear MiL working on the farm and chopping wood right up until she went into labour doesn't make me feel better.  Funny that...   ::)

I bet you a hundred dollars it didn't happen like that. My children are 16 months apart. In that short period of time, I had already forgotten the more unpleasant aspects of pregnancy that I'd gone through with the first. I don't doubt that at one time most women worked harder through pregnancy than we do now, but I do doubt that it was a magical experience for them. Physical exertion might make you feel better (especially during first trimester), but getting yourself to do it if it's not a necessity is easier said than done.


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Utah

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Re: Pregnancy/birth etiquette
« Reply #143 on: February 20, 2012, 06:57:36 PM »
LOL - I'm sure you're right about it not being all sunshine and rainbows!   :) 

But hearing about superwoman is still the last thing I want to hear when I'm feeling green and don't have the energy to move off the sofa once I get home from work.

lollylegs

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Re: Pregnancy/birth etiquette
« Reply #144 on: February 20, 2012, 08:05:44 PM »
I have another one to add, if I may:

If you (or somebody close to you) had a blissfully easy pregnancy and were fit and active right up until the day you delivered, that's wonderful.  But don't throw that experience in the face of others who may be ill, exhausted, etc.  Every pregnancy is different, and those stories/attitudes can make the newly expectant mother feel even worse than she already does.

==

I'm 8 weeks into my first pregnancy, tired and sick, and strangely hearing stories about my dear MiL working on the farm and chopping wood right up until she went into labour doesn't make me feel better.  Funny that...   ::)

I'd also like to add, don't brush off a woman's concerns about childbirth because women in less developed areas give birth in the tobacco fields, or whatever.

MrsJWine

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Re: Pregnancy/birth etiquette
« Reply #145 on: February 20, 2012, 08:12:29 PM »
I'm pretty sure those stories about women giving birth in the fields and then going straight back to work are a myth. I can't even begin to imagine how that's physically possible. And I don't mean toughness-wise.


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jemma

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Re: Pregnancy/birth etiquette
« Reply #146 on: February 20, 2012, 08:26:16 PM »
5.  Only the mother gets to decide whom she wants to attend the delivery in the delivery room.  The parents jointly get to decide who can come to the hospital. Grandparents, in-laws, and other relatives and friends do not have an automatic right to be present-regardless of the fact that a new member of their family is about to be born. 

Would love to hear thoughts on this; I know two women who didn't want the father of the child in the delivery room (in both cases it was the woman's husband, ie attentive partners, not deadbeat or absent fathers). One of them changed her mind, but the other stood firm and her husband had to wait outside. So. Do attentive partners have a right to be in the delivery room?

No.  No one has the right to be present at a medical procedure except the patient and the professional of choice.  That said, I can't imagine NOT wanting my DH to be there...

I wouldn't judge her too quickly.  He may have be a loving, attentive father and husband, but that doesn't mean he's good in a crisis.  Some men simply can not deal with the stress of watching their wife deliver (no judgement on the, I'm sure it's pretty scary) and end up being more of a hindrance than a help.  A woman in labor does have the time or energy to comfort anyone, and the medical staff should be focused on her, not an hysterical husband.

Just a different perspective.

Judge?  Was that directed at me?
I was merely stating a thought relative to my own marriage, not that I couldn't fathom any circumstance ever where a father's presence may be unwanted.

And if it was directed at me, I don't judge her at all. I've given birth myself and no way was anyone coming in that room without my say so. However, my heart absolutely broke for the father who so desperately wanted to be there for the birth of his daughter and couldn't. It's a tricky one, that's why I was interested in hearing other peoples opinions.

WOAH! Just offering another perspective.  Defensiveness not necessary.

Sorry, I wasn't getting defensive, although I can see how it reads that way. Just responding to your comment, and thought I was being clever by repeating the poster before me.

Don't judge other people's relationships based on who they do and don't allow to see them give birth.     ;)

Danismom

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Re: Pregnancy/birth etiquette
« Reply #147 on: February 20, 2012, 08:39:34 PM »
I agree that the mother (with some input from the father) get to decide who is in the delivery room.  However, I think it is rude for parents to think they get to say who can or cannot occupy the public spaces of hospital waiting rooms.  The patient room belongs to the patient.  The rest of the hospital does not.  Provided those in the waiting room are not causing problems in the hospital, the new parents only get to dictate who sees their baby, when, and who comes into the patient room.

On the other hand, if your loved ones have chosen to have private time with their new bundle of joy, don't try to make them feel guilty for it.  They will call you back when they are ready for you if they are ready for you.  And the order that they call for visitors may have absolutely nothing to do with what you are thinking it means.

When DS was born, DH and I were the only ones in the room.  My deceased mother's sister, Aunt S, was babysitting almost 2 yo DD.  Aunt S and my father both came to town a few days before DS was born because we knew time was getting close.  Immediately after the birth, I was only allowed DH and 2 visitors at a time.  My dad got his feelings hurt because I called for Aunt S and DD first.  He was ticked that I let Aunt S see/hold DS before the grandparents.  He didn't think about the fact that in my mind I only called for Aunt S to come back because she would be bringing DD.  I wanted DD to be the first person that wasn't already in the room to meet the little guy.

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Re: Pregnancy/birth etiquette
« Reply #148 on: February 20, 2012, 09:24:00 PM »
I'm pretty sure those stories about women giving birth in the fields and then going straight back to work are a myth. I can't even begin to imagine how that's physically possible. And I don't mean toughness-wise.

I would assume that women who did that (if that was ever true) didn't have any choice in the matter. I can't see anyone willing to go work in a field after giving birth.

Sophia

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Re: Pregnancy/birth etiquette
« Reply #149 on: February 20, 2012, 10:13:36 PM »
Well, as someone who kicked my loving attentive husband out of the delivery room (and then scolded him for staying gone so long), I do think a mother giving birth has ultimate say on who is in the room.