Author Topic: Pet Etiquette  (Read 26174 times)

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Millionaire Maria

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #15 on: March 12, 2009, 10:10:49 PM »
Just wanted to add that there are already countries where this is illegal. Germany is one of them. Maybe something to consider for the Guide.

Could you tell me what is illegal so I can add that in there?

Both docking and declawing are illegal practices in Germany. I've just googled a bit and it seems they are illegal in Austria and Switzerland, too. Can't speakt for other European countries.  :)

Thanks for the info. I wonder if the dog shows have different standards over there as well, due to the ban on tail docking. I think I'll wander over to google and find out.....
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dawbs

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #16 on: March 12, 2009, 10:23:15 PM »
Just wanted to add that there are already countries where this is illegal. Germany is one of them. Maybe something to consider for the Guide.

Could you tell me what is illegal so I can add that in there?

Both docking and declawing are illegal practices in Germany. I've just googled a bit and it seems they are illegal in Austria and Switzerland, too. Can't speakt for other European countries.  :)

Thanks for the info. I wonder if the dog shows have different standards over there as well, due to the ban on tail docking. I think I'll wander over to google and find out.....
Yup, different standards...which are *starting* to be adopted here (many of the dockings and such are no longer *mandatory* in the US--which, of course, doesn't mean that you won't be judged as if it is--meaning that it's legal for a non-docked animal to compete it's just painfully unlikely he or she would win)
(the 'controversy' portion on wikipedia does a decent job addressing it--and a good list of where things are/aren't allowed:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Docking_(dog)
)

Millionaire Maria

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #17 on: March 13, 2009, 02:18:38 AM »
Just wanted to add that there are already countries where this is illegal. Germany is one of them. Maybe something to consider for the Guide.

Could you tell me what is illegal so I can add that in there?

Both docking and declawing are illegal practices in Germany. I've just googled a bit and it seems they are illegal in Austria and Switzerland, too. Can't speakt for other European countries.  :)

Thanks for the info. I wonder if the dog shows have different standards over there as well, due to the ban on tail docking. I think I'll wander over to google and find out.....
Yup, different standards...which are *starting* to be adopted here (many of the dockings and such are no longer *mandatory* in the US--which, of course, doesn't mean that you won't be judged as if it is--meaning that it's legal for a non-docked animal to compete it's just painfully unlikely he or she would win)
(the 'controversy' portion on wikipedia does a decent job addressing it--and a good list of where things are/aren't allowed:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Docking_(dog)
)

Thanks dawbs. Very enlightening.
People everywhere enjoy believing in things they know are not true. It spares them the ordeal of thinking for themselves and taking responsibility for what they know. –Brooks Atkinson

Auntie Mame

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #18 on: March 20, 2009, 06:04:34 PM »
19) My cat is terrified of children (due to being terrorized when she was a kitten, before I rescued her).  On the rare occasions children come over, she mostly hides (smart kitty).  But she lives here, your child does not and eventually she may wander downstairs.  I will NOT tolerate any teasing, cornering, baiting, chasing or any other "ing" of my cat.  If your child is older, they should know better, if they are younger, you should know better.  If you can not respect the personal space of the cat, you will be asked to leave. (Thankfully this has NEVER come up, my friends raise their kids to respect animals).

20) Please, please tell me if you are allergic and I will make accomdations (even shut her in my room, yes with food, water and the box).  But kicking at my cat and screaming "GET AWAY" is not the appropriate way to handle your allergy (YES, this has happened...).

21) Only I discipline my cat. Period.

ETA: To chastise myself for not reading the thread completely.  Thanks Maria DD!
« Last Edit: March 20, 2009, 07:04:44 PM by Littlepixie »
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PeasNCues

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #19 on: March 20, 2009, 06:24:47 PM »
22) If you do not do something about your animal after several reasonable request, it is not rude for the harassed person to do something for you.

** This needs some limitors, but I can't think of what. To illustrate: My BF's roommate had a macaw she allowed to roam free. Usually, BF does not allow it in her room (as it defecates everywhere), especially when I am there as I am afraid of birds. Both BF and her roomie know of the fear as I made sure they knew before I came over. BF, BF's roomie and I are all sitting there and in walks mr. macaw. He's beautiful, but again - the fear! But, he took a liking to me and walked over to me and started NIBBLING on my TOES! AHHH!! I am pulling my feet away and asking BF's roomie to please remove the bird - over and over. Then the bird grabbed my pant legs and attempted to CLIMB UP MY LEGS. I shoved him away with my foot (note - I DID NOT kick him, just shoved him away so i could move away from him - I was pinned between him and a chair I was sitting on) jumped up and stood on my BF's bed while BF's roomie yelled at me that he just liked me and want to make friends as macaw shuffled around the room aparantly unaffected by the entire episode.

I think the rude ones were BF and her roomie for not doing something when I was paralyzed with fear and practically begging them to help.
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Millionaire Maria

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #20 on: March 20, 2009, 06:58:51 PM »
22) If you do not do something about your animal after several reasonable request, it is not rude for the harassed person to do something for you.

** This needs some limitors, but I can't think of what. To illustrate: My BF's roommate had a macaw she allowed to roam free. Usually, BF does not allow it in her room (as it defecates everywhere), especially when I am there as I am afraid of birds. Both BF and her roomie know of the fear as I made sure they knew before I came over. BF, BF's roomie and I are all sitting there and in walks mr. macaw. He's beautiful, but again - the fear! But, he took a liking to me and walked over to me and started NIBBLING on my TOES! AHHH!! I am pulling my feet away and asking BF's roomie to please remove the bird - over and over. Then the bird grabbed my pant legs and attempted to CLIMB UP MY LEGS. I shoved him away with my foot (note - I DID NOT kick him, just shoved him away so i could move away from him - I was pinned between him and a chair I was sitting on) jumped up and stood on my BF's bed while BF's roomie yelled at me that he just liked me and want to make friends as macaw shuffled around the room aparantly unaffected by the entire episode.

I think the rude ones were BF and her roomie for not doing something when I was paralyzed with fear and practically begging them to help.

I think those fall under numbers 2 and 11.  :)
« Last Edit: March 20, 2009, 07:03:20 PM by Maria DD »
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Millionaire Maria

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #21 on: March 20, 2009, 07:02:43 PM »
19) My cat is terrified of children (due to being terrorized when she was a kitten, before I rescued her).  On the rare occasions children come over, she mostly hides (smart kitty).  But she lives here, your child does not and eventually she may wander downstairs.  I will NOT tolerate any teasing, cornering, baiting, chasing or any other "ing" of my cat.  If your child is older, they should know better, if they are younger, you should know better.  If you can not respect the personal space of the cat, you will be asked to leave. (Thankfully this has NEVER come up, my friends raise their kids to respect animals).

20) Please, please tell me if you are allergic and I will make accomdations (even shut her in my room, yes with food, water and the box).  But kicking at my cat and screaming "GET AWAY" is not the appropriate way to handle your allergy (YES, this has happened...).

21) Only I discipline my cat. Period.

Those fall under 5, 12, and 10. I made an ammendment to 5 in order to include keeping one's children under control as well.  :)
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Sleepless

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #22 on: March 20, 2009, 07:07:01 PM »
Children should never be allowed to approach a strange dog without the owner's express permission. Adults really shouldn't either.

Don't ever attempt to pet a dog left in a vehicle. They are often very possessive in that situation.

Don't ever disparage someone else's choice of pet.

Millionaire Maria

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #23 on: March 20, 2009, 07:12:29 PM »
Children should never be allowed to approach a strange dog without the owner's express permission. Adults really shouldn't either.

Don't ever attempt to pet a dog left in a vehicle. They are often very possessive in that situation.

Don't ever disparage someone else's choice of pet.

The first two fall under number 5. I ammended number 6 to include all pets.  :)
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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #24 on: March 21, 2009, 01:51:27 AM »
Don't let your dog run up to a leashed dog while saying, "It's OK, he's friendly." Your dog may be the friendliest dog in the world - the other person's may not be.

When my dog jumps up on you, and I say "Gracie, get off," Please don't say, "That's OK" and encourage her. I am not apologizing to you, I am trying to train my dog. Please do not sabotage my training.

When walking on a mixed-use trail, if you hear or see a bicycle coming, call your dog to heel and move to the side of the trail. (You'd be surprised at how many cyclists have thanked me , in a surprised tone of voice, for doing this.)

At dog shows, strollers, especially the big ones, are not a good idea. You want to be able to scoop baby up away from face-licking dogs. Not to mention that male dogs might lift their leg on it. (Show dogs are not fixed, and there is usually at least one female in season present, so most of the boys will want to mark anything that sticks up.)

Most people at dog shows will be happy to talk abut their dogs and their breed - but not when they're waiting to go into the ring. They will be trying to settle their dogs down and get them to focus.

Always, always, always ask before you pet someone's dog, and teach your kids to do so too. And take "no" for an answer.
"Someday we must write a book of Etiquette for sensible people," said Mrs. Morland, "though apart from a few rules it really boils down to an educated mind and a kind heart." ~ Angela Thirkell, Never Too Late

KenveeB

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #25 on: March 21, 2009, 10:44:40 AM »
Don't let your dog run up to a leashed dog while saying, "It's OK, he's friendly." Your dog may be the friendliest dog in the world - the other person's may not be.

And when my dog IS leashed and is mannerly walking down the sidewalk without bothering anyone, don't give me the evil-eye and expect me to haul him into the street just because YOUR dog is going to yap and chase him.  The unmannered dog is the one that should be more strictly controlled.  And no, just because your dog is smaller doesn't automatically mean he's better-behaved.  My dog is 53 pounds, but he walks politely on his leash, sits on command, and behaves when I tell him to.  I'd rather have him around than your 10 pound dog that goes running down the street while you shout "Muffin!  Muffin honey, don't DO that!"   ::)

Quote
When my dog jumps up on you, and I say "Gracie, get off," Please don't say, "That's OK" and encourage her. I am not apologizing to you, I am trying to train my dog. Please do not sabotage my training.

That's so annoying.  I'm trying to teach Casey to sit when he first meets people (to avoid the jumping).  So someone will come charging up and say "can I pet him?", and I'll say "he just has to sit first," and they'll start petting him anyway.  The worst are the boys who think it's hysterical to make the dog jump up!

SiotehCat

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #26 on: March 21, 2009, 11:33:10 AM »
When my dog jumps up on you, and I say "Gracie, get off," Please don't say, "That's OK" and encourage her. I am not apologizing to you, I am trying to train my dog. Please do not sabotage my training.

Maybe I am reading this wrong, but if you had control of your dog on a leash, why would he be jumping on people? And once he jumps on people, your first response is not one of apologies to the person being jumped on?

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #27 on: March 21, 2009, 02:05:57 PM »
When my dog jumps up on you, and I say "Gracie, get off," Please don't say, "That's OK" and encourage her. I am not apologizing to you, I am trying to train my dog. Please do not sabotage my training.

Maybe I am reading this wrong, but if you had control of your dog on a leash, why would he be jumping on people? And once he jumps on people, your first response is not one of apologies to the person being jumped on?

I had this problem all the time trying to train my parents little dog.  It was usually people who approached us without asking, and then encouraged the jumping.  i had control of the dog, but if I'm walking him down the sidewalk, working on teaching him how to ignore people, that all gets messed up when the person we were ignoring starts talking to him, or stops and fusses. (I'm not talking about polite people who as we approached each other said something, then I could prepare myself, and the dog)

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #28 on: March 21, 2009, 02:11:54 PM »
When my dog jumps up on you, and I say "Gracie, get off," Please don't say, "That's OK" and encourage her. I am not apologizing to you, I am trying to train my dog. Please do not sabotage my training.

Maybe I am reading this wrong, but if you had control of your dog on a leash, why would he be jumping on people? And once he jumps on people, your first response is not one of apologies to the person being jumped on?
First response is to correct the dog. If you wait, it's too late. Second response immediatly after correcting the dog should be apologies.

kareng57

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #29 on: March 21, 2009, 03:05:52 PM »
Don't let your dog run up to a leashed dog while saying, "It's OK, he's friendly." Your dog may be the friendliest dog in the world - the other person's may not be.

And when my dog IS leashed and is mannerly walking down the sidewalk without bothering anyone, don't give me the evil-eye and expect me to haul him into the street just because YOUR dog is going to yap and chase him.  The unmannered dog is the one that should be more strictly controlled.  And no, just because your dog is smaller doesn't automatically mean he's better-behaved.  My dog is 53 pounds, but he walks politely on his leash, sits on command, and behaves when I tell him to.  I'd rather have him around than your 10 pound dog that goes running down the street while you shout "Muffin!  Muffin honey, don't DO that!"   ::)

Quote
When my dog jumps up on you, and I say "Gracie, get off," Please don't say, "That's OK" and encourage her. I am not apologizing to you, I am trying to train my dog. Please do not sabotage my training.

That's so annoying.  I'm trying to teach Casey to sit when he first meets people (to avoid the jumping).  So someone will come charging up and say "can I pet him?", and I'll say "he just has to sit first," and they'll start petting him anyway.  The worst are the boys who think it's hysterical to make the dog jump up!


I can relate to that.  Our dog doesn't do it anymore - but I was having a hard time training him not to do this.  It turned out that our sons (age around 10 and 11 at the time) and their friends thought it was funny and were actually encouraging him.