Author Topic: Gone 100  (Read 27207 times)

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Emmy

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #30 on: February 26, 2010, 02:41:47 PM »
This pertains mainly to rural areas, but if you allow a dog to roam outside, make sure it is trained not to chase people who happen to walk along the street or ride by on a bike.  If your dog can't be trusted not to chase people who pass by or the mailman/UPS worker, ect., it would be better to keep it inside, behind a fence, or on a chain.

snoopygirl

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #31 on: February 27, 2010, 07:57:49 AM »
This pertains mainly to rural areas, but if you allow a dog to roam outside, make sure it is trained not to chase people who happen to walk along the street or ride by on a bike.  If your dog can't be trusted not to chase people who pass by or the mailman/UPS worker, ect., it would be better to keep it inside, behind a fence, or on a chain.


Pod to this. If you don't do this it can scare somebody who is walking along. When I walk to the shops ( so we are talkin a busy road as it has three big supermarkets) there is a house with a dalmation that is not chained when it is out. That dog is mean. It growls at you and starts to run toward you. Sometimes I am scared it will attack and dogs don't usually scare me. After it is done scaring the pants off of me it runs away. But I wonder if I should say something to somebody about this dog.

Auntie Mame

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #32 on: March 02, 2010, 07:48:10 PM »
1) Do not jump on my head at the crack of dawn, you are not starving, you can wait a few minutes for your food

2) Do not jump up on my lap and shove your bottom in my face, I don't need to see that

3) Do not try to trip me while I am walking down the stairs, if I break my arms, no one can feed you

4) Do not jump on a guests jacket and make sweet sweet love to it, it's embarrassing

5) OH! Can't you do that in the other room? Honestly!

6) Do not start yowling and batting at my head when I am on the phone, I AM NOT TALKING TO YOU!

7) Do not climb on my dinner plate or try to knock my food off my fork so you can eat it

8 ) Use the designated scratching post only

Now, does anyone know how to get a cat to follow etiquette?

Heehee, someone had to :)
« Last Edit: March 03, 2010, 05:24:54 AM by Littlepixie »
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JonGirl

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #33 on: March 03, 2010, 04:44:50 AM »
1) Do not jump on my head at the crack of dawn, you are not starving, you can wait a few minutes for your food

2) Do not jump up on my lap and shove your bottom in my face, I don't need to see that

3) Do not try to trip while I am walking down the stairs, if I break my arms, no one can feed you

4) Do not jump on a guests jacket and make sweet sweet love to it, it's embarrassing

5) OH! Can't you do that in the other room? Honestly!

6) Do not start yowling and batting at my head when I am on the phone, I AM NOT TALKING TO YOU!

7) Do not climb on my dinner plate or try to knock my food off my fork so you can eat it

8 ) Use the designated scratching post only

Now, does anyone know how to get a cat to follow etiquette?

Heehee, someone had to :)

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Brandydan

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #34 on: March 17, 2010, 01:39:11 PM »
Just because one person (um...me) may own more than one purebred, pedigree dog does NOT make it okay for you to demonize that person and claim that (a) all 'recognized' bre3ds of dogs/cats come from puppymills and (b) a shelter animal died in its place.


PeasNCues

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #35 on: March 17, 2010, 01:58:06 PM »
Just because one person (um...me) may own more than one purebred, pedigree dog does NOT make it okay for you to demonize that person and claim that (a) all 'recognized' bre3ds of dogs/cats come from puppymills and (b) a shelter animal died in its place.

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L.A. Lady

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #36 on: March 17, 2010, 02:26:49 PM »
Just because one person (um...me) may own more than one purebred, pedigree dog does NOT make it okay for you to demonize that person and claim that (a) all 'recognized' bre3ds of dogs/cats come from puppymills and (b) a shelter animal died in its place.

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Lillie82

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #37 on: March 21, 2010, 08:21:39 PM »
[

7. It is not appropriate to discuss your opinions on Breed Specific Legislation in mixed company. It is a political topic, and with all political topics, it can get heated and out of hand. This goes for any kind of "current event" or incident you may have seen on the news that could lead to a discussion of BSL.


lol. I know some people who are into many political things, (many having to do with discrimination against groups of people) and they also rescue animals. They find it "bigoted" to generalize that a particular breed is inherently aggressively or viscious.


[/quote]

Garden Goblin

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #38 on: April 30, 2010, 06:16:26 PM »
When it comes to tail docking, ear cropping, de clawing, breeding, or any other controversial subject, it is not your business what another pet owner chooses to do or not do. As much as you may despise the practice, it is not abuse, and therefore it is not acceptable to comment on it. Please note that laws detailing abuse differ from area to area. Please be informed before taking any action.

Agreed.

My old boxer was cropped and docked, and I took abuse on it a couple times.  The thing was, she was a rescue dog, and came to me that way, as well as terrified of people, nearly dead from starvation, covered in ticks and fleas, and suffering from kennel cough. 

KenveeB

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #39 on: April 30, 2010, 07:20:46 PM »
When it comes to tail docking, ear cropping, de clawing, breeding, or any other controversial subject, it is not your business what another pet owner chooses to do or not do. As much as you may despise the practice, it is not abuse, and therefore it is not acceptable to comment on it. Please note that laws detailing abuse differ from area to area. Please be informed before taking any action.

Agreed.

My old boxer was cropped and docked, and I took abuse on it a couple times.  The thing was, she was a rescue dog, and came to me that way, as well as terrified of people, nearly dead from starvation, covered in ticks and fleas, and suffering from kennel cough. 

Besides, boxer tails are docked for a reason!  Their tails are very thin and fragile, and it's very common for them to get "happy tail" -- hitting it against things when they wag to the point that they break bones and basically beat it bloody.  My rescue boxer had a natural tail when he was rescued, but they had to dock it within a few weeks because he was beating it bloody against his crate.

Waltzing Matilda

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #40 on: July 04, 2010, 07:15:29 AM »
If you're scared of dogs or don't like them, don't go for a walk on the leash-free dog beach! We have a couple of dog beaches near us and I couldn't tell you how many times I've come across (usually) women screaming at people to keep their dogs away from them. All of the dogs are beautifully behaved - I've never seen a dog fight at one of these beaches as the dogs are too busy having fun with each other. I even had one berate me for having my dog off her leash on the beach. Lady, it's a leash-free area specifically set aside for dogs. We live on the Gold Coast; there are about 40km of other beaches that are set aside just for people. Please feel free to use them and not hassle my dog.
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DistantStar

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #41 on: July 04, 2010, 10:51:54 AM »
Ah, so I'm not the only one out there with a declawed kitty saying, "I didn't do it!  She came from the shelter, and it was her previous people!  I swear!"  (I won't deny that it's rather nice not being clawed, but I think it's truly unfair and mean to do it.)

Lady Snowdon

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #42 on: July 06, 2010, 03:09:33 PM »
Please don't argue with the owners when you ask what breed of dog/cat/rabbit/whatever they have.  Insisting that no, the pet must be a *whatever you think* is rude.  Even if the owners say they have no idea, or only a partial idea, stating authoritatively that *you know* can be considered rude.  Unless you're the person who bred that particular pet!

I'll always remember the lady who insisted our AKC registered Chesapeake Bay Retriever must be a Labrador, because MiHi was the same color as a chocolate lab.  She followed me for at least three blocks, claiming that she knew better than I did!  I almost offered to run home and find MiHi's papers, but didn't want her to know where we lived.  I was afraid to walk the dog on her normal route for almost a week, because I didn't want to meet that lady again. 

Hollanda

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #43 on: May 21, 2011, 03:56:48 PM »

4. Service dogs are not pets, they are workers. Do not interact with them at all, unless you have the explicit permission of the person who is using them.

5. Do not approach or interact with anyone's pets without their permission. Do not feed animals without permission. It is also your responsibility to make sure that your children do not interact with or feed pets without the owner's permission.


These two are fundamental. I saw a man with a service dog on a bus. The number of adults/kids who approached the dog was incredible. I had to eventually step in for the man and say "Please, do not touch a dog when he's in the harness, he's working." The man said "Thank you, sweetie, I get nervous saying that!" I really, really WOULD not touch a service dog whilst in the harness. It's not fair on the dog and confuses the boundaries for them. A working dog is just that, a working dog.

I would not actually touch anyone else's dog unless I know the dog and owner VERY well indeed. I have been bitten by 2 dogs, on one occasion it was partly my fault (I was intoxicated, the man brought the dog into a crowded pub and I really should not have gone anywhere near the thing).  These days, I avoid dogs, totally, unless I KNOW that the dog won't panic and try to attack me. There is only 1 dog I will go near and he is a dear regular of our local pub, an old black labrador, so docile and friendly with people and genuinely loves to be petted. I know his owner very well and she knows me, but more importantly the DOG knows me. I quite often go in there with treats for Abdul! DF adores this dog as much as I do. He is the only dog I feel able to approach at the moment.

Approaching a strange dog in public, to me, is just not good.

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Mopsy428

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Re: Pet Etiquette
« Reply #44 on: May 28, 2011, 12:24:10 AM »
Quote
10. Do not correct someone else's animal unless you have their permission to do so.

11. In reference to #10, people should never be put in the position of having to correct your animal. If you do not believe in teaching an animal certain behaviors (leash training, not begging, not jumping up) that is your right. However, if you choose to refrain from teaching these things, please refrain from bringing your animal around other people. This applies to all pets regardless of species or size.

So, just to clarify, if a pet is jumping on a person, that person is not rude to correct, right? Because I hate being jumped on, being sniffed, and having my toes bitten, so if your pet does do that, I will have to tell him/her to stop doing that. I'll give the owner a chance, but if the pet is jumping on me, I will probably tell him to stop.

I'm not sure if these will fall in as corollaries, but here is what I thought of:

-If you antagonize an animal (like pulling its tail/hair/skin), please do not blame the owner if/when the animal reacts. It's not the animal's fault.

-On the other hand, if your animal does cause harm to another person, don't blame the person. The excuses "You ran away from Fido!", "You were giving off an odor that made pet react" and "You are pregnant. What did you expect him to do?" do not mean that your pet was justified in harming someone.

(Example: I was walking home from school when someone's Dalmatian bit me. I saw it running down the street, heard it barking, and I started to run, although I didn't make it that far before it secured its teeth into my calf. The owner said that the dog was leashed. This was false, as 3 other people could confirm, and then the owner told the police officer that it was my fault because I was "running away". The police officer looked at the owner and said, "Lady, she's 7. The dog is bigger than she is. It was chasing her down the street. What did you think she was going to do?"

Then when my Mom was pregnant with my sister and me, she was walking home from the store when the neighbor's Doberman pincher (unleashed, on public property) jumped on her and she slipped on ice while trying to get away from it. The owner said to her, "The dog probably did that because you are pregnant. You need to be careful."  ::))

-Please do not tell someone who has been bitten by an animal that it "didn't hurt that badly". Yes, it does hurt, particularly if it was a large animal.

(I feel like telling these people that if it doesn't hurt that badly, they should go down to the police station and volunteer to be a subject for K-9 unit training. But I don't.  :-X)