Etiquette School is in session! > The Ehell Guide to Never Behaving Badly

Workplace etiquette

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Lisbeth:

--- Quote from: KitFox on April 10, 2009, 10:26:55 AM ---
--- Quote from: KeenReader on April 09, 2009, 12:27:27 PM ---1.  Dress appropriately for the job, whether that's a business suit, uniform, or office casual.  If you are not employed as a stripper or club owner/worker, do not underdress or wear tight or excessively revealing clothing, have visible body piercings, or wear too much makeup.  You are there to work, not pick people up.
--- End quote ---

I'm not sure I agree with this part. I think that as long as the workplace doesn't have rules against them, it's not an etiquette issue but a personal taste. Many people find piercings attractive and feel that their jewelry is part of their identity.

--- End quote ---

But many others don't-especially in a professional situation.  Just because something is "part of one's identity" to oneself, it is not necessarily appropriate professional dress.  When in doubt, leave it out.

Mahdoumi:

--- Quote from: KeenReader on April 10, 2009, 10:35:04 AM ---
--- Quote from: KitFox on April 10, 2009, 10:26:55 AM ---
--- Quote from: KeenReader on April 09, 2009, 12:27:27 PM ---1.  Dress appropriately for the job, whether that's a business suit, uniform, or office casual.  If you are not employed as a stripper or club owner/worker, do not underdress or wear tight or excessively revealing clothing, have visible body piercings, or wear too much makeup.  You are there to work, not pick people up.
--- End quote ---

I'm not sure I agree with this part. I think that as long as the workplace doesn't have rules against them, it's not an etiquette issue but a personal taste. Many people find piercings attractive and feel that their jewelry is part of their identity.

--- End quote ---

But many others don't-especially in a professional situation.  Just because something is "part of one's identity" to oneself, it is not necessarily appropriate professional dress.  When in doubt, leave it out.

--- End quote ---

Agreed.  Tattoos and unusual piercings are still perceived as unprofessional in a lot of conservative corporate environments.  Personal identity isn't a primary factor in presenting the corporate image.  The golden rule of dress codes still applies, "Dress for the job you want, not the job you have."

Virg:
Mahdoumi wrote:

"The golden rule of dress codes still applies, "Dress for the job you want, not the job you have.""

Of course, there was a comedian who once said, "My boss told me to dress for the job that I want.  So I showed up the next day in a Cubs uniform."

Anyway, my additions:

If you use up a communal resource, replace it, refill it or notify that person who can so that it's available for the next person.

Take care not to interfere with other people's work if possible.  Don't chitchat if they can't take the time.  Don't do stuff that ties up resources that someone else will need on a deadline.  Let someone know you're going off for lunch if you're the only one with a forklift license and a big shipment is due in while you'll be hard to find.  Consider your actions in the context of making the workplace run as smoothly as possible.

I'll also modify "Don't use your office computer for unauthorized personal use, including Internet browsing and E-mail."  I'll say, Remember that your company computer (or whatever) is the company's property, and so don't treat it as your own.  Follow the rules laid out for company equipment use, only "personalize" it if the rules allow, and don't store anything on it or in it that you don't want the company to have access to.

Virg

ginlyn32:
15) The Golden Rule of the Internet still applies: If you wouldn't want your Mother or Boss to see it, don't post about it! Yes, people have been warned and even been fired for things they posted about online! (no I don't think this is fair, but hey...that's life!)

16) Unless you work in a vetrenarian's office or some sort of animal rescue, it's never appropriate to bring an animal to work. Unless it's a service animal.

17) Make an honest effort to keep your work area clean. Don't make a mess and then leave it for the Janitoral Staff to clean because "that's what they get paid for". Also, if you do happen to clog the toilet, use the plunger to clear it. If it's really bad, call maitenence, but don't just leave it for the next person to find.

18) If you find that you are going to be late to work (10 car pileup on the freeway or your alarm didn't go off), please call! Don't leave the rest of your crew/team wondering where you are.

19) Do not comment on anyone's usage of sickleave/vacation time.

ginlyn

KitFox:

--- Quote from: Mahdoumi on April 10, 2009, 12:40:51 PM ---
--- Quote from: KeenReader on April 10, 2009, 10:35:04 AM ---
--- Quote from: KitFox on April 10, 2009, 10:26:55 AM ---
--- Quote from: KeenReader on April 09, 2009, 12:27:27 PM ---1.  Dress appropriately for the job, whether that's a business suit, uniform, or office casual.  If you are not employed as a stripper or club owner/worker, do not underdress or wear tight or excessively revealing clothing, have visible body piercings, or wear too much makeup.  You are there to work, not pick people up.
--- End quote ---

I'm not sure I agree with this part. I think that as long as the workplace doesn't have rules against them, it's not an etiquette issue but a personal taste. Many people find piercings attractive and feel that their jewelry is part of their identity.

--- End quote ---

But many others don't-especially in a professional situation.  Just because something is "part of one's identity" to oneself, it is not necessarily appropriate professional dress.  When in doubt, leave it out.

--- End quote ---

Agreed.  Tattoos and unusual piercings are still perceived as unprofessional in a lot of conservative corporate environments.  Personal identity isn't a primary factor in presenting the corporate image.  The golden rule of dress codes still applies, "Dress for the job you want, not the job you have."

--- End quote ---

I didn't assume we were talking about conservative, corporate offices alone. There are a great deal of companies that are fine with piercings/tattoos, and I think narrowing jobs they're all right for down to 1) stripper, or 2) club worker, is a bit, well, harsh.
If the company dress code allows for them, then I don't think you can say it's in bad taste. To me, this is like the hair issue discussed in "All In A Day's Work" where someone was told they were "unprofessional" for having long hair. (I think the thread was titled "That's news to me.") Some might see certain things as unprofessional, and some might not, but a personal choice that is not against company policy is not de facto bad etiquette.

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