Author Topic: Workplace etiquette  (Read 39471 times)

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Brentwood

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #30 on: April 12, 2009, 08:55:49 PM »


I addressed this in post #16.

I just think a general rule about following the workplace dress code is sufficient without specifically mentioning visible piercings. There are too many variables in workplaces and dress codes to address that issue specifically.

Kaylee

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #31 on: April 12, 2009, 09:15:01 PM »
Respectfully, Cathy has put it well--there is just no etiquette issue there.  Listing a rule against visible piercings or any other bit of personal decoration implies that intrinsically it is "rude" and may only be tolerated in, you know, those less particular workplaces.  Which I would maintain is not the case.  What you choose to do with your own body is manifestly your own business and not an etiquette issue at all.  (And no, I have no dog in this hunt or visible piercings of my own.   ;))  Even the "when in doubt, leave it out" rule would imply to my senior advisor, a pediatric neurologist with thirty-five years experience, that her nasal piercing is questionable.   It's not.

Whether or not it's advisable or mannerly in your own workplace is adequately covered by a rule about adhering to your own workplace's dress code.

Lisbeth

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #32 on: April 12, 2009, 09:18:48 PM »
Respectfully, Cathy has put it well--there is just no etiquette issue there.  Listing a rule against visible piercings or any other bit of personal decoration implies that intrinsically it is "rude" and may only be tolerated in, you know, those less particular workplaces.  Which I would maintain is not the case.  What you choose to do with your own body is manifestly your own business and not an etiquette issue at all.  (And no, I have no dog in this hunt or visible piercings of my own.   ;))  Even the "when in doubt, leave it out" rule would imply to my senior advisor, a pediatric neurologist with thirty-five years experience, that her nasal piercing is questionable.   It's not.

Whether or not it's advisable or mannerly in your own workplace is adequately covered by a rule about adhering to your own workplace's dress code.

My point was that in post #16 I made a suggestion that essentially says the same.  It's not necessary to keep bringing this up.
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Kaylee

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #33 on: April 12, 2009, 10:34:11 PM »
Keenreader, if disagreeing with items on your list bothers you to the point that you are using the "not necessary to keep bringing this up" line, perhaps you should not be taking suggestions or posting a list that invites them.

You do not get to tell people to stop bringing things up.  Open forum.  Supposed to be a collaborative effort.  Polite disagreement with you =/= "keep bringing it up".    If you're not open to changing things on the list, make it privately and no one will disagree with you.

No, I don't think that you said "essentially the same."  What you suggested in post #16 still implies that piercings are intrinsically rude.  As I said in my previous post, and as Cathy is saying in hers.

Alida

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #34 on: April 12, 2009, 10:39:44 PM »
Regarding alcohol consumption at work-related events...

Even if you're getting together with coworkers outside of work, a nice casual get-together, please, please, PLEASE remember that these are the people you will be facing on Monday!

It seems one of my coworkers was less than well-behaved during a recent drunken binge.  She said hurtful things to managers who were present and was generally a "mean drunk."

When discussing things with another who was there, I reminded them that even though these are not specifically work events, they are with people who are NOT their friends, but coworkers, and that what they said/did at such events still reflected upon them.

Her response? "Oh, wow - I didn't even think about that!"

*headdesk*

And this is why we STILL don't have a firm answer on our contract!

skbenny

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #35 on: April 12, 2009, 11:16:35 PM »
But, is it ever okay to forgo an office party because you just don't want to go, or even to summarily "opt out" of office social events altogether?  I mean, in the REAL world, parties are optional, an invitation is not a summons, and ideally, it shouldn't matter as long as you finish all your work and you're nice to everyone, right?

This question can only be answered by each specific work culture. 

I really like my coworkers, however I like my family more.  Between work and my commute I spend at least 12 hours a day away from home.  Once I am home it takes a lot to get me to leave my family.  Work parties, right now, do not qualify as more important than time with my DH.  With my work culture I can do this, with other jobs I have had I could not.

My workplace rule:  If someone is reading in the breakroom and they do not put their book down when you come in, leave them alone.  They are reading the book because they want to be left alone.

guihong

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #36 on: April 12, 2009, 11:24:02 PM »
From when I worked at a grocery store:

1) Take breaks and lunch on time, and return on time, ready to go back to work.  Other people are waiting for their lunches, too.

2) Don't side-talk to the bagger, someone else working the next register, or a friend in the store.   Keep talk to the job at hand. (my own pet peeve when I'm the customer)

3) My store made a point of hiring people with mental or physical challenges.  NO snide remarks were tolerated.



YogaChick

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #37 on: April 12, 2009, 11:28:53 PM »
Respectfully, Cathy has put it well--there is just no etiquette issue there.  Listing a rule against visible piercings or any other bit of personal decoration implies that intrinsically it is "rude" and may only be tolerated in, you know, those less particular workplaces.  Which I would maintain is not the case.  What you choose to do with your own body is manifestly your own business and not an etiquette issue at all.  (And no, I have no dog in this hunt or visible piercings of my own.   ;))  Even the "when in doubt, leave it out" rule would imply to my senior advisor, a pediatric neurologist with thirty-five years experience, that her nasal piercing is questionable.   It's not.

Whether or not it's advisable or mannerly in your own workplace is adequately covered by a rule about adhering to your own workplace's dress code.

My point was that in post #16 I made a suggestion that essentially says the same.  It's not necessary to keep bringing this up.

One piercing in each earlobe is okay, right?

skbenny

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #38 on: April 12, 2009, 11:35:02 PM »
One piercing in each earlobe is okay, right?

That depends on the office.  I know people with visible piercings all over their nose, lips and brows.  Many of those have "professional" jobs.  Frankly, I don't care what is pierced as long as the work is done well.

The only time I have ever seen a prohibition on piercings was in prison (previous employment, not lifestyle ;))

Bob Ducca

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #39 on: April 13, 2009, 12:13:30 AM »
I think the wording of rule #1 is very inflammatory.  Could it be worded differently?

1. Observe the standard of dress appropriate for your company and/or position.

Is there anything needed other than that?  I'm not sure why referencing strippers or club owners is even there, it just seems provocative to me.

YogaChick

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #40 on: April 13, 2009, 01:18:25 AM »
I think the wording of rule #1 is very inflammatory.  Could it be worded differently?

1. Observe the standard of dress appropriate for your company and/or position.

Is there anything needed other than that?  I'm not sure why referencing strippers or club owners is even there, it just seems provocative to me.

Yeah, I got that sense too--according to the original wording of Rule #1, I must be headed for a life as a stripper or a prostitute because my ears are pierced.

snowball's chance

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #41 on: April 13, 2009, 10:54:55 AM »
Respect work friends who like to keep their work and social lives separate, or more separate than you do.

5a) Conversely, if your coworker takes cigarette breaks during the workday, just because the smoker is your coworker doesn't mean you're allowed to make unsolicited comments about about their choice. 

If smelling smoke or a strong scent on your coworker really irritates you or aggravates your allergies &/or respiratory system, than take the issue up with the appropriate authority (your supervisor, HR, etc) to discuss how to solve the problem, vs. getting angry with your coworker (assuming your coworker is following the organization's smoking policies).

snowball's chance

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #42 on: April 13, 2009, 11:29:35 AM »
Respect your coworkers' personal workspace.  If s/he's sitting in his or her office or cubicle, announce yourself before entering, by knocking or verbally greeting.  If said coworker's not in his/her office to not rifle through personal drawers or cabinets if you don't have permission to do so.  If you need something that s/he has on her or his desk, and the coworker is away from it, jot a short note like, "Needed to grab the Johnson file - Your Name"

KitFox

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #43 on: April 13, 2009, 11:39:25 AM »
*If you are a smoker, please keep your smoke breaks to the mandated time, and try not to take breaks during "crunch" times. Announcing a smoke break when there are three projects that need to be done in a half hour and none of them ARE actually finished is selfish and disrespectful.

*If you are anti-smoking, please do not attempt to block your coworkers' smoke breaks by "just one little thing"-ing them to death until they've run out of time. That will not help them quit, and will only make them frustrated with you.

Lisbeth

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #44 on: April 13, 2009, 01:07:40 PM »
I think the wording of rule #1 is very inflammatory.  Could it be worded differently?

1. Observe the standard of dress appropriate for your company and/or position.

Is there anything needed other than that?  I'm not sure why referencing strippers or club owners is even there, it just seems provocative to me.

Yeah, I got that sense too--according to the original wording of Rule #1, I must be headed for a life as a stripper or a prostitute because my ears are pierced.

To both of you:  Please check post #16.
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