Author Topic: Workplace etiquette  (Read 37891 times)

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Brentwood

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #75 on: April 21, 2009, 01:22:19 PM »
Visible tattoos and piercings are not inherently impolite, so it is unnecessary to single them out in this particular guideline.

I tried not to, and you're right, I should have given a variety of examples. Very short skirts, too-tight britches, statements on T-shirts, overly casual outfits, and so on, can also bother others if they're not the norm for that workplace. I tried to shape my phrasing to encompass the concept, not specific possible situations:

"Dress according to the explicit dress code of your workplace, and if there is none, use common sense in following the prevailing standards of that profession. Should you rebel against those standards, do not make others uncomfortable in your rebellion, and do not be surprised should disciplinary actions result."

Outside of the actual suggested guideline, I kept with tattoos/piercings because that's where the conversation was (and, admittedly, to let out a pet peeve), but a selection of examples would have been better. Apologies.

Actually, I don't think a selection of examples is necessary at all. I don't think anything is necessary beyond, "Follow the dress code of your workplace."

penelope2017

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #76 on: April 21, 2009, 01:24:59 PM »
Visible tattoos and piercings are not inherently impolite, so it is unnecessary to single them out in this particular guideline.

I tried not to, and you're right, I should have given a variety of examples. Very short skirts, too-tight britches, statements on T-shirts, overly casual outfits, and so on, can also bother others if they're not the norm for that workplace. I tried to shape my phrasing to encompass the concept, not specific possible situations:

"Dress according to the explicit dress code of your workplace, and if there is none, use common sense in following the prevailing standards of that profession. Should you rebel against those standards, do not make others uncomfortable in your rebellion, and do not be surprised should disciplinary actions result."

Outside of the actual suggested guideline, I kept with tattoos/piercings because that's where the conversation was (and, admittedly, to let out a pet peeve), but a selection of examples would have been better. Apologies.

Actually, I don't think a selection of examples is necessary at all. I don't think anything is necessary beyond, "Follow the dress code of your workplace."

Right! That's what I've been saying a few times in the thread too.

Nannerdoman

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #77 on: April 24, 2009, 04:49:31 PM »
The little everyday courtesies--"Thank you", "Please," "Excuse me", etc.--make for a more pleasant workplace environment.  Extra points if used by a supervisor!

Give credit where credit is due:  "Actually, that was Sue's idea."  "Bob did a lot of the work on this report." 
I'm the grammarian against whom your mother warned you.

ginlyn32

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #78 on: April 24, 2009, 09:31:16 PM »
Acknowledging peoples' greetings is a big one for me.

When I was working as a receptionist, I would always greet people saying "Good Morning" or "Hello". Most people responded back, but some people would walk right by me as if I was invisible.

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misha412

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #79 on: June 05, 2009, 04:13:41 PM »

Please use the handset of your phone instead of your speaker. Hearing your communal conversation from across the office (down the hall, on the next floor etc.) is disruptive.

If you need to have a hallway (aisleway) conversation, please keep the volume under control or be aware of others using the phone.

Be aware of any habits that might annoy or disrupt those around you. Example would be the office mate who, at random times, begins banging his/her mouse on the desk or stomping their feet on old wooden floors. Included in this would be loud grunting continously, or making noises like a pinball machine. (This does not include someone who cannot help it for medical reasons, just those that do it out of years of unconscious habit).





KitFox

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #80 on: June 08, 2009, 12:52:35 PM »
* Be aware that interrupting someone 5 times for five minutes each time costs them more time than one half-hour interruption. Set up conversations in advance via email, and take everything you need to give someone with you for ONE interruption.

These are all Business, but fall under a Meeting Etiquette sub-heading:

* Do NOT play with your cellphone/pda/blackberry
* Take coughdrops if you know you're going to have to cough or clear your throat repeatedly
* Be aware of the agenda and don't hijack the meeting to talk about your pet project
* Be on-time, or better yet, a minute or two early
* If the choice is between going and being unpleasant, or not going, DON'T GO! Your negativity will spread.

ch1pch0p

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #81 on: June 08, 2009, 12:56:54 PM »


These are all Business, but fall under a Meeting Etiquette sub-heading:

* Do NOT play with your cellphone/pda/blackberry


Depends on what you mean by "play." Obviously, a person should not be playing games, but if I'm in a two-hour meeting, I cannot go that long (during the work day) without checking my messages. I think that would be a case that's more of knowing your audience. There are some client meetings that I would be very discreet about how I used it, but in an internal company meeting, most of us would be checking periodically.

KitFox

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #82 on: June 08, 2009, 01:12:06 PM »


These are all Business, but fall under a Meeting Etiquette sub-heading:

* Do NOT play with your cellphone/pda/blackberry


Depends on what you mean by "play." Obviously, a person should not be playing games, but if I'm in a two-hour meeting, I cannot go that long (during the work day) without checking my messages. I think that would be a case that's more of knowing your audience. There are some client meetings that I would be very discreet about how I used it, but in an internal company meeting, most of us would be checking periodically.

I get what you're saying. That's why I was trying to be clear by using the word "play." As in games, texting for non-work-related reasons, checking personal email, etc.

kitty-cat

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #83 on: June 08, 2009, 01:20:38 PM »
If you want in when someone orders out for lunch, tell the person ordering and not someone who also orders with that person.  I work at the office that my mom does, and there is one person there, "Tony", who tells me to tell my mom to let him know when we are ordering chinese. 

Send me to E-hell for this but if you are a grown person who is at least twice my age (I'm 18...) then you should be able to let the person who does the ordering know that you want to order your own food too.

(Sorry if that rambles a bit.  Tony just did the "let your mom know, okay?" thing not 10 minutes ago.)




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Venus193

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #84 on: June 08, 2009, 01:30:58 PM »

Please use the handset of your phone instead of your speaker. Hearing your communal conversation from across the office (down the hall, on the next floor etc.) is disruptive.


This is not always possible.

At my present company and the two previous everyone had speakerphones.  Nobody abused the privilege; we all had to use them from our cubicles from time to time when either there was no conference room availalble or it was a standard weekly conference call that we mostly listened to.  It is impossible to multitask properly during such a call if one hand has to hold the receiver.  Hands-free headsets were ruled too expensive to be stocked and issued to everyone.

The answer here is to keep the volume low and to speak in a relatively low volume in general.  My present company is in a loft space on an "open plan" (no walls between desks).  There is no other way to deal with this.

misha412

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #85 on: June 09, 2009, 08:56:29 AM »

Please use the handset of your phone instead of your speaker. Hearing your communal conversation from across the office (down the hall, on the next floor etc.) is disruptive.


This is not always possible.

At my present company and the two previous everyone had speakerphones.  Nobody abused the privilege; we all had to use them from our cubicles from time to time when either there was no conference room availalble or it was a standard weekly conference call that we mostly listened to.  It is impossible to multitask properly during such a call if one hand has to hold the receiver.  Hands-free headsets were ruled too expensive to be stocked and issued to everyone.

The answer here is to keep the volume low and to speak in a relatively low volume in general.  My present company is in a loft space on an "open plan" (no walls between desks).  There is no other way to deal with this.


I was more talking about the people who use their speaker phones for every call they take or receive.

I work in an office housed in an old mansion. We have a few people who insist on using their speaker phones for most of their calls. Even if they are calling a person just down the hall. I can be coming up the stair case and hear their conversation in stereo because both are on speaker.

snowball's chance

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #86 on: June 09, 2009, 09:12:43 AM »
If you want in when someone orders out for lunch, tell the person ordering and not someone who also orders with that person.  I work at the office that my mom does, and there is one person there, "Tony", who tells me to tell my mom to let him know when we are ordering chinese. 

Send me to E-hell for this but if you are a grown person who is at least twice my age (I'm 18...) then you should be able to let the person who does the ordering know that you want to order your own food too.

(Sorry if that rambles a bit.  Tony just did the "let your mom know, okay?" thing not 10 minutes ago.)

Nope made sense to me, I think it falls under, "Don't expect employees that aren't your Personal Assistant to act like one" -- could give many, many examples of this.  Not to say everyone shouldn't help each other out, but I have several colleagues who expect others to do things like ship their packages and type letters for them, not because it's anyone else's job to do so, but because they don't know how to do it themselves & refuse to learn.

But this post reminded me:  When ordering food to be delivered to the office, let the receptionist know you're expecting a delivery, and then stay where you can be found by the receptionist until your food arrives.

Venus193

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #87 on: June 09, 2009, 09:19:17 AM »
I have never seen that behavior in anyone I've ever worked with, especially in the last 8 years.  I rarely use the speaker phone anymore because of the ridiculous "open plan" office I'm in.

petal

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #88 on: June 10, 2009, 02:58:45 AM »
If youre having a bad day  don't take it out on workmates or customers.


Please dont swear in front of customers/clients


Remember your manners  (please, thankyou, excuse me)


Smell fresh and clean EVERY day


Keep your bad habits at home


Dont disrupt others


Dont contradict other staffmembers/colleagues  in front of clients/customers


Keep your voice to a reasonable level.


Remember that not everyone wants to hear you whistle, crack knuckles, snort, tap feet etc


Please dont bring your unhealthy germs to work.  If youre sick stay home.  If you come to work  ill  theres  a high  probablility that someone else will get sick because of you.


Welcome new staff members.


Dont spread gossip


Dont listen to gossip

kitty-cat

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Re: Workplace etiquette
« Reply #89 on: June 10, 2009, 08:49:12 AM »

Please dont bring your unhealthy germs to work.  If youre sick stay home.  If you come to work  ill  theres  a high  probablility that someone else will get sick because of you.

POD POD POD and did I say POD?  A manager of another department where my mom and I work came to work really, really sick once and got my mom sick.  She got me sick, I got my stepdad sick and a some people at school sick before I got sick. (contagious before symptoms...)




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