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  • June 29, 2016, 07:53:42 AM

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Author Topic: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch  (Read 157074 times)

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amandaelizabeth

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #1485 on: Yesterday at 10:07:23 PM »
We too use the word "palletise" when talking about amalgamating shipments to fit on one pallet.  However I did see what I hope was a typo "pelletise" which has a whole different meaning.


diesel_darlin

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #1486 on: Today at 01:37:39 AM »
A coworker of mine is originally from the north. We currently live in a southern state. Yes, I realize that the dialect around these parts is

questionable to you. Yes, I realize that we talk funny. Your opinion holds no credibility with me when you correct my vernacular while using

words like "dranken" or "boughten".

(I just winged the spelling  ;D)

You silly Southerners with your made up words like "drank" and "bought." Of course the northern coworker should mock you!

 ;D ;D ;D ;D

Anniissa

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #1487 on: Today at 07:23:02 AM »
Hilarious phrase of the day: The train "toots like an apparition."

Ah, yes, the old 'farting ghost' trope?

Was it from someone writing in British English? Toot means to briefly sound the horn on your vehicle. However, even in that context the phrase is really badly written - I suppose they might be trying to get across that the sound of the train's whistle was similar to the stereotypical wail of a ghost but, if so, there are many better ways of getting that idea across.

#borecore

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Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #1488 on: Today at 07:37:58 AM »
Quote from: #borecore link=topic=100 45 .msg3421809#msg3421809 date=1467146362
Hilarious phrase of the day: The train "toots like an apparition."

Ah, yes, the old 'farting ghost' trope?

Was it from someone writing in British English? Toot means to briefly sound the horn on your vehicle. However, even in that context the phrase is really badly written - I suppose they might be trying to get across that the sound of the train's whistle was similar to the stereotypical wail of a ghost but, if so, there are many better ways of getting that idea across.

Train whistles toot here, too. But ghosts are typically of living things, and I was making a joke because tooting is also used to refer to flatulence.

I like the idea of a train sounding ghostly, but a tooting apparition is more Casper the Friendly than Moaning Myrtle, IYKWIM.