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  • February 08, 2016, 09:13:29 AM

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Author Topic: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)  (Read 387405 times)

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VorFemme

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1710 on: Yesterday at 05:10:40 PM »
Years ago my MIL was appalled to hear that I was spending $10 per yard for quality quilting fabric. I'd hate to hear what she thinks of today's prices, especially since I favor hand dyes. She was convinced more than $3 per yard was a rip off.

It takes at least the same amount of time to cut out quilt pieces from cheap fabric as good fabric, it may take slightly longer to get the grain lined up...if you can, sometimes cheap fabric is printed off grain because nobody wants to spend the *time* to get the fabric on grain...

It takes at least the same amount of time to get the pieces sewn together into squares (if not slightly more time to get the off grain fabric to the correct shape - off grain fabric doesn't always stay the same shape) and get the pieces pressed properly to retain their shape...again, off grain fabric may not want to stay the correct shape...

Then comes the assembly of the patches sewn into into the whole top (more pressing may be needed for off grain than on grain - to make it flat), layer it with batting (also comes in a variety of prices), and the backing fabric.

It is actually harder to quilt off grain fabric and some cheap batting than it is to quilt on grain fabric and *good quality* batting (which also comes in more than one price point - but the "cheap" stuff isn't always an even thickness, may not be easy to get a needle through, and may get lumpy when washed unless quilted very close together).

Then there's cheap thread that breaks more, isn't color fast (also seen in cheap fabric), and may knot & twist more as you try to work with it.

In short, a cheap quilt may be more trouble and the materials will break down faster in use...and probably unevenly, at that.

A quilt made of higher quality materials will usually be easier to work with, the materials will "age" better, and it will not lead the quilter to tear her (his) hair out or make them want to stomp on the danged thing...

My MIL insisted on working with "good fabric" and was constantly amazed at how much $$ she was spending - but they all turned out looking good and were snapped up by her children.  To the point that by the time the Ambrosia Hino wanted a quilt (about the time her brother was born - VorSon), there was only one more "spare" quilt in her possession as they were all on either her bed, FIL's bed, or some other family member's bed.

Ambrosia Hino got a quilt - Grandma told her that her brother was going to have to inherit his father's quilt or her mother (me) could make them quilts.  I don't do hand sewing for *the whole thing* like she did...not to mention that I'm not their grandmother...so, a different level of "this was made for me by _____".

She gave up quilting years ago due to vision & trouble with her hands - so - no more new quilts will be coming from Grandma's house. 

I've made small quilts (place mats, pot holders to use for getting things out of the oven, and wall quilts) - no bed sized ones...and I've certainly never done that much hand stitching!
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blue2000

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1711 on: Yesterday at 05:19:21 PM »
I knitted mice fairies for some craft-y friends for Christmas. 
(The pattern is here:

 http://www.alandart.co.uk/product/all-patterns/furry-fairiesfree/

 Tiny, so the material costs were pennies, but fiddly to put together and embellish; I put whiskers on my meeces.  A neighbour saw them and said 'you could sell those!  You'd easily get 99p for them!'.  Cue one deflated knitter.... Fortunately my craft-y friends loved them, and don't think I'm a cheapskate.

Hugs! Those look like lovely gifts! Your neighbour is the cheapskate if they wouldn't pay more than 99p.
You are only young once. After that you have to think up some other excuse.

VorFemme

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1712 on: Yesterday at 06:17:25 PM »
It's a copyrighted pattern - it says so on the page - making them for gifts is usually fine - making them for sale is more likely to be a problem.  Unless it mentions being okay to make them for a fund raiser for a non-profit? 

Copyright can get hairy quickly, even in the same country - since I'm not in the UK, my advice would be to laugh at the person who thinks 99p is a fair price for such an item and tell them that it would be faster & easier to just donate that much in change rather than do the work & use the materials for making the mice.

Some people seem to think that making smaller items is easier than larger items - because, you know, they're smaller.

They've clearly never worked with smaller diameter needles (or crochet hooks) or tried to keep track of the number of stitches in small diameter yarn (where did I put my reading glasses?)...

Smaller is not easier - it's fussier and sometimes a lot more work than people like your neighbor would credit!
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I explain?

gmatoy

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1713 on: Yesterday at 07:18:48 PM »
I used the link and saw the very cute fairy mice and was instantly hit with envy! I love them! I don't do anything with yarn and don't actually know anyone with whom I could barter my sewing! I'm sure that they are beyond sweet in person!

Psychopoesie

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1714 on: Yesterday at 10:39:38 PM »
The fairy mice are gorgeous. Wish I was a good enough knitter. Only a beginner though and cable scares me. Maybe one day.

Worth way way more than 99p. Seriously!

KB

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1715 on: Today at 12:12:08 AM »
I used the link and saw the very cute fairy mice and was instantly hit with envy! I love them! I don't do anything with yarn and don't actually know anyone with whom I could barter my sewing! I'm sure that they are beyond sweet in person!

Etsy has quite a selection.

lowspark

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1716 on: Today at 07:42:27 AM »
On vacation we recently visited a souvenir shop that turned out to be a handicraft fair. [snip]

Seriously, why do people think that anything hand made should be cheap?

There is a LOT of traveler advice out there about how, outside of developed countries, you should always haggle prices. It's all negotiable--they always quote an outrageously high price at first and you are expected to haggle. It's an expected game, you know. Or, they always try to cheat visitors, so you should haggle because otherwise you will be cheated. Unfortunately, that advice doesn't go into specific cultural situations or the nuances of when to haggle and when to accept the offering price. Some people accept the advice at face value and presume that if they don't haggle in every situation, they will be ripped off.

This. Some people think you must haggle [in certain countries/situations]. Period.

I'm a haggler. I want the best price. But sometimes, the item in question is already marked at a fair and reasonable price, or even below. At least in my eyes. I only haggle if I feel like something is overpriced (and of course, if the situation is such that haggling is expected).

I think that being a good haggler includes the skill of knowing when haggling is called for and when it's not.
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Outdoor Girl

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1717 on: Today at 07:52:48 AM »
I'm horrible at haggling.  If something is at a price I'm not willing to pay, I don't buy it. 

Where I am good, though, is if I've decided I'm buying something and decide I want multiple somethings, I can usually swing a buy so many, get one free kind of deal.  Like one vendor at the flea market who had sunglasses for $X a pair.  I wanted 7 pairs for various people but only had 6 times $X in cash.  I asked if he'd take $6X cash for the 7 pairs.
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hjaye

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1718 on: Today at 08:21:28 AM »
On vacation we recently visited a souvenir shop that turned out to be a handicraft fair. [snip]

Seriously, why do people think that anything hand made should be cheap?

There is a LOT of traveler advice out there about how, outside of developed countries, you should always haggle prices. It's all negotiable--they always quote an outrageously high price at first and you are expected to haggle. It's an expected game, you know. Or, they always try to cheat visitors, so you should haggle because otherwise you will be cheated. Unfortunately, that advice doesn't go into specific cultural situations or the nuances of when to haggle and when to accept the offering price. Some people accept the advice at face value and presume that if they don't haggle in every situation, they will be ripped off.

I think that advice is geared more towards the established shops.  When my wife go on a cruise any shop we go into (especially jewelry), we are told, don't pay attention to the price marked on the item, I can give you a great discount.

So for example you might see a piece of jewelry and the price on the sticker will be 15,000.  My first reaction is to just say forget it, but then they'll say, no no, that is not your price, I can give you 75% off, so now it's only 3,750.  Of course you may have gone in only wanting to spend a few hundred dollars, but now you're thinking wow a 15,000 dollar piece of jewelry for less than 4,000.  At least that's what I think the idea is behind the deep discounts.  But this happened in just about every store we went into.  It didn't matter what island we were on.

iridaceae

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1719 on: Today at 08:44:58 AM »

I think that advice is geared more towards the established shops.  When my wife go on a cruise any shop we go into (especially jewelry), we are told, don't pay attention to the price marked on the item, I can give you a great discount.



Not always; the vendors in Guatemala selling their weavings and huipils at stands or places like Chichicastenango expected haggling. I'm terrible at it so had my dad do it. The three Turkish ladies on the tour were expert hagglers and got the best deals. In stores though we paid what the price said.
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lowspark

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1720 on: Today at 08:53:08 AM »
I'm horrible at haggling.  If something is at a price I'm not willing to pay, I don't buy it. 

Where I am good, though, is if I've decided I'm buying something and decide I want multiple somethings, I can usually swing a buy so many, get one free kind of deal.  Like one vendor at the flea market who had sunglasses for $X a pair.  I wanted 7 pairs for various people but only had 6 times $X in cash.  I asked if he'd take $6X cash for the 7 pairs.

That is haggling.  ;D
All haggling is, is to ask if the seller will take less than the posted price. By asking if they'll sell you seven for the cost of six is just that. So... you're a haggler and don't even know it!

I think many people think that haggling means you go back and forth, or lowball in order to get somewhere in the middle. That is one aspect of haggling but it isn't always necessary or even desirable. When I haggle, I pretty much offer what I'm willing to pay. If the seller accepts it, we're done. If they come back with a price in the middle, I might consider it and accept or I might say no. But I'm not going to come back and split that difference and on and on.

I think the distaste for the prospect of back & forth negotiating is what puts a lot of people off of the idea of haggling, but it doesn't have to be that way.
Houston 
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One Fish, Two Fish

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1721 on: Today at 09:07:18 AM »
I'm horrible at haggling.  If something is at a price I'm not willing to pay, I don't buy it. 

Where I am good, though, is if I've decided I'm buying something and decide I want multiple somethings, I can usually swing a buy so many, get one free kind of deal.  Like one vendor at the flea market who had sunglasses for $X a pair.  I wanted 7 pairs for various people but only had 6 times $X in cash.  I asked if he'd take $6X cash for the 7 pairs.

That is haggling.  ;D
All haggling is, is to ask if the seller will take less than the posted price. By asking if they'll sell you seven for the cost of six is just that. So... you're a haggler and don't even know it!

I think many people think that haggling means you go back and forth, or lowball in order to get somewhere in the middle. That is one aspect of haggling but it isn't always necessary or even desirable. When I haggle, I pretty much offer what I'm willing to pay. If the seller accepts it, we're done. If they come back with a price in the middle, I might consider it and accept or I might say no. But I'm not going to come back and split that difference and on and on.

I think the distaste for the prospect of back & forth negotiating is what puts a lot of people off of the idea of haggling, but it doesn't have to be that way.
Haggling can be an art, too.  :)  I do it often at flea markets.  I don't get to do it as much at craft sales though.  I do have great respect for personally made pieces.  What makes me crazy is the amount of people who don't know how much their own skill is worth.  "Pay me what you think is fair" is a horrible premise.  That way I feel like I'm being ripped off, and the crafter feels cheated. 
I'll get there.  Eventually.