Author Topic: Instant justice stories  (Read 37539 times)

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StarFaerie

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #225 on: Yesterday at 07:02:53 AM »
I'll tell one on myself...

There is a library in town that has metered parking.  It's always a gamble - do you waste money on paying the parking meter when you're just going in for 5 minutes?  The likelihood is you won't get a ticket, but if the cops do come during that 5 minute period, you'll really wish you had paid that 25 cents to the meter.

So when I was young and cocky and parked there, I was going into the library without having paid the meter.  A car pulled up next to me and the man got out and asked, "Don't you have to pay for parking here?"  I decided to be friendly and give the newbie some advice.  I said, "Technically yes, but don't worry, you don't have to really pay because they never check."  The stranger said, "Are you sure?" and I said, "Yes, positive, don't worry about it!"

Went into the library.  Came out 10 minutes later.  You guessed it....I had a ticket.  The "stranger" must have been a meter man!

I definitely learned my lesson ;)

Interesting. I never see it as a waste. I always saw it as my payment towards the cost of the land and the parking spaces and just to government revenue. Not paying would never occur to me regardless of the chance of getting a ticket. Maybe that's why I've always been so baffled at why people seemed not to pay and hence got tickets. Thanks so much for that! I love seeing things from other's points of view.

For a quarter, it's not worth the risk of a ticket to me.

Oh, you both are definitely right -- I did the wrong thing.  Which is why I posted the story here, not to brag, but to show a time when I was young and stupid did get instant comeuppance for making the wrong choice!

Please don't think I was judging you. I was not. Merely interested in the different way of seeing the world. Truly thankful for the insight. :)

kherbert05

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #226 on: Yesterday at 11:27:24 AM »
Dad had 2 new executives that he was to train. The Aggie and the Jerk. Now Dad had some university, but he also worked his way up from the warehouse. He thought the executives should know the basics about each job. That way they would have an understanding of why things were done X way and not Z way.

Aggie - followed Dad's instructions, learned all the jobs.

The Jerk - thought he should be promoted over Dad (either VP or president of company at the time) because he had a degree and Dad did not. Stepping into the warehouse was below him. I saw him once when we were picking up the sound truck for the rodeo. His body language was like he was in a germ infested lab, he didn't want to touch anything including the floor with his shoes.

Aggie's wife - well read educated woman treated everyone with respect

Jerk's wife - snide social climber who implied my introverted Mom had trapped Dad to get a green card. (Baylor College of Medicine and obtained permanent resident status for everyone they brought down from McGill.)

An 18 wheeler jackknifed after its driver had been told to stay put in Dallas/Fort Worth and that the company would fly him home for Christmas and deal with the truck later because parts of 45 were shut down due to ice. It was suspected that Jerk had told driver to disobey Dad because boss was unhappy. Any 18 wheeler jackknifing is serious - but with beer trucks there is all sorts of bad publicity. The "old men" of the warehouse warned Dad that Jerk was trying to cause trouble and was changing instructions. He causing dangerous situations because he didn't know how the warehouse worked. (Like ordering a guy to not waste time removing some rings. Dad had a rule no rings, watches, bracelets, any necklaces tucked inside your shirt. Back when Dad worked the warehouse a man was seriously injured when his wedding ring caught on a roll up door. Not powered just one you raised by pulling on it like a garage door with out an opener but taller. Boss, President before Dad, Dad, and all other office people took off jewelry before stepping foot on warehouse floor. Not jerk.

Then Jerk went to boss with evidence that Dad and Aggie were embezzling money. Boss took one look at the paper work. Got the accountants and lawyers working on it and had Jerk arrested in short order. There were several errors he made in his attempted frame up. But the one that tipped boss off immediately. The signatures of Dad and Aggie were flawless except for 1 detail - they were in black ink. Dad NEVER signed anything in black ink - because a person could copy your signature (this was in the mid 80's) with a copier. That is exactly what Jerk had done. Aggie had followed Dad's lead and always used colored ink to (usually blue) to sign originals.
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TootsNYC

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #227 on: Yesterday at 11:46:20 AM »
After reading the icy road stories, it brought up a couple of stories.

First, my husband grew up in North Dakota...dealing with severe winters, icy roads and all. He is an excellent driver in ice and snow and know to take it very easy on icy roads. One winter day, he was driving along on an icy highway at about 25 mph. A semi-truck comes roaring by him doing at least 45 to 50. By the time my husband got to the next overpass, the said semi had jack-knifed and hit the overpass supports. The driver was not hurt, but his trailer was severely damaged.

Second is my story. I live in the mountains. Driving on an icy mountain road is different than driving on relatively flat roads. On very icy mornings, many people do not go out of the house until the sun has melted the ice or the DOT has laid down salt. I worked at a place that was up on top of a hill and required a mile drive up a winding narrow mountain road. The company had offices in another state, which gets a lot of snow and ice, but does not have any significant hills or mountains. A team from that particular location was visiting our site on a day that we had a very bad ice storm.

Most of us that live in this area came in a couple of hours late that morning. The team from the other state decided to come in early. They were used to driving on ice and thought we were silly for not wanting to challenge this icy steep road. On the way up the mountain, I passed a few cars in the ditch. What I did not know was that one of those vehicles was the rental for the visiting group.

Apparently, driving up a mountain in ice is not the same as driving on relatively flat roads in icy conditions.

Did you get an apology?

I'm confused--why did anyone owe her an apology?


blueyzca01

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #228 on: Yesterday at 12:36:27 PM »
^^ They were used to driving on ice and thought we were silly for not wanting to challenge this icy steep road.
No one ever says, "Why me?!?!" when something good happens.

Shalamar

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #229 on: Yesterday at 01:57:34 PM »
Quote
Apparently, their parents had to come pick them up from school. I don't remember anyone else using the teacher's derogatory nickname the rest of the year.

I don't know; that seems pretty petty of the teacher.  Students often don't like their teachers and call them rude names; it's not like they were being disrespectful to his face or threatening bodily harm.

Slartibartfast

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #230 on: Yesterday at 02:11:44 PM »
Quote
Apparently, their parents had to come pick them up from school. I don't remember anyone else using the teacher's derogatory nickname the rest of the year.

I don't know; that seems pretty petty of the teacher.  Students often don't like their teachers and call them rude names; it's not like they were being disrespectful to his face or threatening bodily harm.

It may depend greatly on the name.  I can think of some racially-based epithets which would absolutely justify more than a slap on the wrist.

MindsEye

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #231 on: Yesterday at 02:16:41 PM »
Quote
Apparently, their parents had to come pick them up from school. I don't remember anyone else using the teacher's derogatory nickname the rest of the year.

I don't know; that seems pretty petty of the teacher.  Students often don't like their teachers and call them rude names; it's not like they were being disrespectful to his face or threatening bodily harm.

It may depend greatly on the name.  I can think of some racially-based epithets which would absolutely justify more than a slap on the wrist.

I agree with Slartibartfast.

Also, regarding the bolded ... really?  Politeness is more then just how you treat someone to their face, and it is never too soon for kids to find out that what they say to/about authority figures can have serious repercussions.

Shalamar

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #232 on: Yesterday at 04:22:38 PM »
I see your point - I guess what I was trying to say is that if the students were talking quietly between themselves ("Mr. Jackson?  More like Mr. Jerkson, am I right?"), that's one thing.  If they're going around complaining loudly to anyone who'll listen that "Mr. Jerkson" assigns too much homework, that's different.  To me, anyway.

And I totally agree about the nature of the name.  Something genuinely insulting or racist is a whole 'nother story.
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 04:24:18 PM by Shalamar »

Cherry91

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #233 on: Yesterday at 06:38:38 PM »
Dad had 2 new executives that he was to train. The Aggie and the Jerk. Now Dad had some university, but he also worked his way up from the warehouse. He thought the executives should know the basics about each job. That way they would have an understanding of why things were done X way and not Z way.

Aggie - followed Dad's instructions, learned all the jobs.

The Jerk - thought he should be promoted over Dad (either VP or president of company at the time) because he had a degree and Dad did not. Stepping into the warehouse was below him. I saw him once when we were picking up the sound truck for the rodeo. His body language was like he was in a germ infested lab, he didn't want to touch anything including the floor with his shoes.

Aggie's wife - well read educated woman treated everyone with respect

Jerk's wife - snide social climber who implied my introverted Mom had trapped Dad to get a green card. (Baylor College of Medicine and obtained permanent resident status for everyone they brought down from McGill.)

An 18 wheeler jackknifed after its driver had been told to stay put in Dallas/Fort Worth and that the company would fly him home for Christmas and deal with the truck later because parts of 45 were shut down due to ice. It was suspected that Jerk had told driver to disobey Dad because boss was unhappy. Any 18 wheeler jackknifing is serious - but with beer trucks there is all sorts of bad publicity. The "old men" of the warehouse warned Dad that Jerk was trying to cause trouble and was changing instructions. He causing dangerous situations because he didn't know how the warehouse worked. (Like ordering a guy to not waste time removing some rings. Dad had a rule no rings, watches, bracelets, any necklaces tucked inside your shirt. Back when Dad worked the warehouse a man was seriously injured when his wedding ring caught on a roll up door. Not powered just one you raised by pulling on it like a garage door with out an opener but taller. Boss, President before Dad, Dad, and all other office people took off jewelry before stepping foot on warehouse floor. Not jerk.

Then Jerk went to boss with evidence that Dad and Aggie were embezzling money. Boss took one look at the paper work. Got the accountants and lawyers working on it and had Jerk arrested in short order. There were several errors he made in his attempted frame up. But the one that tipped boss off immediately. The signatures of Dad and Aggie were flawless except for 1 detail - they were in black ink. Dad NEVER signed anything in black ink - because a person could copy your signature (this was in the mid 80's) with a copier. That is exactly what Jerk had done. Aggie had followed Dad's lead and always used colored ink to (usually blue) to sign originals.

 :o He tried to ruin your Dad's career, maybe even life, because he had a degree and your Dad didn't? That's not even SS, that's sociopathic!

kherbert05

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #234 on: Yesterday at 09:11:04 PM »

 :o He tried to ruin your Dad's career, maybe even life, because he had a degree and your Dad didn't? That's not even SS, that's sociopathic!
It is scary to me that I I have to remind myself of that. When I was a Sophomore in university a group of us were watching something on TV in the lounge. A plot point was how someone built a pipe bomb. One of the girls asked a question. Karen, Cynthia, and I explained in detail how to make a pipe bomb and the problem with using screw on with thread end caps. It wasn't till we saw the other girls' saucer eyes that it clicked that this wasn't common knowledge. I want to make this clear (Like we did with the dean of students when we got called into his office) not one of us had ever built a bomb. The other 2 had never shot a gun (I have been target shooting since I was 6 or 7). But starting about 3rd or 4th grade this was something a certain group of kids we grew up with did and in the 8 or 9 years this went on only 2 got in trouble. They blew up a classroom - and still a large group of parents tried to get them off.  By some sweet mercy, no one was ever hurt. If someone complained they were told boys blow things up.

This wasn't some small town when kids help blow up tree stumps in the field. This was one of the wealthiest areas of Houston - were new money lives. 

When I was in elementary school I would tell my parents that these boys didn't have parents. They would remind me you met Dr. and Dr. Last Name. I would insist that they weren't parents because they didn't love anyone not their spouse not their kids. Some of them I would even call monsters there was just something dark about them. I felt the same way about Mr. and Mrs. Jerk. So yea they might have been high functioning sociopaths. Many of my neighbors were just very successful con artists building houses of cards.
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guihong

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #235 on: Yesterday at 11:24:23 PM »
I think I've told this story on myself before, but here it is again! kglory reminded me.

When I was in junior high school, there was a policeman at an intersection on my route (I walked).  One day, he asked how school had gone.  I started complaining about my chemistry teacher, Mr. J., who was so hard, gave so much work, etc.  I let Mr. J. have it!  The policeman asked who my teacher was.  When I said "Mr. J.", he laughed and said "Oh, that's my son!"  :-[.

Mr. J. never punished me, if he ever found out, and my embarrassment was enough justice.  Now I remember him as one of my greatest teachers.



Virg

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #236 on: Today at 08:51:34 AM »
Shalamar wrote:

"I don't know; that seems pretty petty of the teacher.  Students often don't like their teachers and call them rude names; it's not like they were being disrespectful to his face or threatening bodily harm."

I don't see it as petty, because teaching respectfulness (and circumspection) is a good lesson, and getting sent home for the day isn't an excessive punishment for such a thing.

Virg

Jocelyn

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Re: Instant justice stories
« Reply #237 on: Today at 11:17:09 AM »
I'm a little skeptical about being sent home being a punishment for anyone.  >:D