Author Topic: etiquette of visiting other countries  (Read 18856 times)

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Mazdoy

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Re: etiquette of visiting other countries
« Reply #15 on: April 29, 2009, 06:31:00 AM »
Making the "V" sign is pretty much only rude in the UK, or commonwealth countries which had a lot of settlers from the UK' who took the gesture with them. It can be quite a trap for visitors from other European countries to the UK, for example.

Also rude in Ireland and I too assumed it was a worldwide thing.  Good to know!

RooRoo

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Re: etiquette of visiting other countries
« Reply #16 on: April 29, 2009, 03:03:13 PM »
I'm confused. I thought the "V" sign was "V for Victory," except when the hippies kidnapped it and made it mean "Peace, man!"

I thought the rude one in the UK was first two fingers together, back of the hand towards the target.

Enlighten me please!
"Someday we must write a book of Etiquette for sensible people," said Mrs. Morland, "though apart from a few rules it really boils down to an educated mind and a kind heart." ~ Angela Thirkell, Never Too Late

JaiJai

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Re: etiquette of visiting other countries
« Reply #17 on: April 29, 2009, 03:57:01 PM »
'V' sign, palm facing away from you is the peace or victory sign. 'V' sign with palm towards you is the equivalent of 'flipping the bird' in the US (although we have that as well).
Jai
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RooRoo

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Re: etiquette of visiting other countries
« Reply #18 on: May 01, 2009, 01:54:11 PM »
Thank you, Jai.
"Someday we must write a book of Etiquette for sensible people," said Mrs. Morland, "though apart from a few rules it really boils down to an educated mind and a kind heart." ~ Angela Thirkell, Never Too Late

cicero

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Re: etiquette of visiting other countries
« Reply #19 on: May 05, 2009, 06:04:30 AM »
- accept that this city may be one big tourist site, but X number of people live and work here every.single.day. So be considerate of others when using public transportation especially during rush hour, and while we understand how amazing our souk (open-air market) is to you - for us it is our supermarket where we go to buy food for our family. it's crowded - you see it as picturesque, we see it as crowded. Friday afternoon is not the best time to pose your family in front of the spice stand

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RoseRose

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Re: etiquette of visiting other countries
« Reply #20 on: May 07, 2009, 10:50:50 AM »
Another thing-  Find out whether bargaining is accepted or not.  It can be acceptable in some places in a country but not others.  If you do want to do so, learning numbers in the language of the country is useful.

And cicero- Someone actually tried that?  Taking pictures in the souk on FRIDAY AFTERNOON?  You'd think the ridiculous crowd would have discouraged them!



Fluffy Cat

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Re: etiquette of visiting other countries
« Reply #21 on: May 09, 2009, 09:23:05 PM »
Most of mine are U.S. city suggestions (specifically Boston), but most can be useful elsewhere:

Be considerate when asking for directions.  Many city-dwellers (although this applies to a lesser degree elsewhere) are happy to help out polite tourists, but make sure you select someone who does not appear to be in a hurry (particularly during rush hour on business days) and ask nicely.  Say thank you and don't argue with the directions given.  You do not have to follow them if you believe them to be incorrect, but at least say Thank You and then continue on to someone else if you must.

If you are driving, for your own safety as well as others, try to generally follow the local traffic customs (legal ones). When in doubt, do not drive in an unfamiliar city unless you must. 

Please do not remark that the city/area you are visiting would not survive without tourist revenue.  This is rude and often inaccurate.

Be careful.  If you are in an unfamiliar or possibly unsafe area, do not obviously pull out a map or otherwise identify yourself as a tourist.  Pay attention to your surroundings and seek out a policeperson (preferably) or a local (if you select them they are more likely to be safe) to ask for assistance.

 



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guihong

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Re: etiquette of visiting other countries
« Reply #22 on: June 01, 2009, 09:16:49 AM »
Like Waltraud brought up, don't get into political discussions or bring up painful or controversial issues in whatever country you are in (ex: Tiannanmen Square or Tibet in China, the situation with aboriginies in Australia, the Soviet Union in Russia, Hitler in Germany).  Doing this is not only very uncomfortable for whoever you are talking to, but can even get them in trouble with authorites.   The only exception might be if the other person brings it up first. 

I have a friend in Russia who I met on a forum for discussion of the Soviet Union and Russo-American relations, so we have discussed some of that.  Our friendship sprang up from other things in common, though.



vorbau

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Re: etiquette of visiting other countries
« Reply #23 on: June 01, 2009, 06:01:27 PM »
My suggestions are based on observations of visitors to my area (Northern VA/DC):

- If you plan on doing a lot of walking, wear comfortable, sturdy, supportive, closed shoes. I know flip-flops and sandals are cool and fashionable, but they are dangerous, especially given the escalators and slippery marble in this area.
- Please dress appropriately for the climate and weather. If you are visiting an area that is hot and humid in the summer, denim is really not a good idea. A hat and your hydrating drink of choice are also good ideas.
- If you visit an attraction that has a security checkpoint, making jokes about terrorism or bombs is a very bad idea and will earn you a great deal of official attention that you will not enjoy.
- If you are visiting a popular destination, area or attraction, realize that you are not the only one interested in visiting that location. Expect crowds and please remember your crowd & queue manners.
Let's roll. (And you can't scare me; I've had teenagers.)

StressedGroom

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Re: etiquette of visiting other countries
« Reply #24 on: June 01, 2009, 06:24:34 PM »
Remember that your tourist site is someone elses home, religious site, work site, or neighborhood.  I was appalled by some of the behavior I saw at the regious sites in Israel.

Understand the food before you go out to eat; I ordered lasagna in Italy.... in Sardinia; you don't order lasagna in Sardinia. 

Be flexible and willing to experiement some.  Here is a conversation I had, in English, in Turkey:
SG: Can we have a menu.
Waiter: Bef... fish... chiken... lamb...
SG: How is the beef prepared
Waiter: Bef... fish... chiken... lamb...
SG: I'll have the beef.

It was the worst steak I've ever had; if I had known then what I know now, I would have ordered the lamb.

Mahdoumi

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Re: etiquette of visiting other countries
« Reply #25 on: June 01, 2009, 08:21:52 PM »
Understand the food before you go out to eat; I ordered lasagna in Italy.... in Sardinia; you don't order lasagna in Sardinia. 

Be flexible and willing to experiement some.  Here is a conversation I had, in English, in Turkey:
SG: Can we have a menu.
Waiter: Bef... fish... chiken... lamb...
SG: How is the beef prepared
Waiter: Bef... fish... chiken... lamb...
SG: I'll have the beef.

It was the worst steak I've ever had; if I had known then what I know now, I would have ordered the lamb.

I busted out laughing at your beef anecdote!  My DH, who is otherwise intelligent, ordered two Turkish coffees in Greece.

zoidberg

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Re: etiquette of visiting other countries
« Reply #26 on: June 02, 2009, 07:06:35 AM »
I busted out laughing at your beef anecdote!  My DH, who is otherwise intelligent, ordered two Turkish coffees in Greece.

Oh dear. Nearly did the same to my Greek boss once - thankfully he had a sense of humour about the whole Greek/ Turkish animosity thing. Hope your DH didn't receive spit-in Turkish coffee.

beingkj

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Re: etiquette of visiting other countries
« Reply #27 on: June 02, 2009, 07:22:09 AM »
...snip...the situation with aboriginies in Australia...snip...

Just a heads up - Aborigines is no longer really used. Aboriginal People or Indigenous Australians are the titles generally used now.
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StressedGroom

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Re: etiquette of visiting other countries
« Reply #28 on: June 02, 2009, 12:25:24 PM »
I was really surprised at the level of emotion some people still held regarding WWII in Europe; for us it is something that happened somewhere else, and only to our grandparents.  To Europeans it was very immediate, personal and the effects were felt much longer than in the US.  Just because you studied it in history class doesn't mean it's only history to them.


Waltraud

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Re: etiquette of visiting other countries
« Reply #29 on: June 02, 2009, 12:33:05 PM »
I was really surprised at the level of emotion some people still held regarding WWII in Europe; for us it is something that happened somewhere else, and only to our grandparents.  To Europeans it was very immediate, personal and the effects were felt much longer than in the US.  Just because you studied it in history class doesn't mean it's only history to them.

POD! Do you even know how right you are? ;)

My grandmother had to flee from Poland in 1945 and ended up in Bavaria. I never learned how to speak "proper Bavarian" because of it. Therefore, I remember Oma and my family history everytime I say something. Can it get any more "close up and personal"?

Waltraud