Author Topic: ". . . And s/he was NOT invited back!" - share your rudest guest stories  (Read 87205 times)

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weeblewobble

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"Couldn't we just share the frog?"

"Certainly!"  ::Reaches for the guest's stuffed frog::

"What are you doing?!"

"Sharing... you *do* share in your family, don't you?"  ::Innocent look::


Did you let them stay for the dinner?! I would have kicked them out and had leftovers for a week.

There were about a dozen guests, aside from the problem family. The initial frog issue occured while I was prepping dinner. I put the frog in the closet and finished cooking. Everybody was sitting down. I assumed Problem parents were fixing son's plate and then I heard the crash of my closet being burgled.  And the final "sharing" incident happened while we were eating.  I don't know whether I would have tossed them.  I didn't know want to make even more of a scene.

Nora

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"Couldn't we just share the frog?"

"Certainly!"  ::Reaches for the guest's stuffed frog::

"What are you doing?!"

"Sharing... you *do* share in your family, don't you?"  ::Innocent look::


Did you let them stay for the dinner?! I would have kicked them out and had leftovers for a week.

There were about a dozen guests, aside from the problem family. The initial frog issue occured while I was prepping dinner. I put the frog in the closet and finished cooking. Everybody was sitting down. I assumed Problem parents were fixing son's plate and then I heard the crash of my closet being burgled.  And the final "sharing" incident happened while we were eating.  I don't know whether I would have tossed them.  I didn't know want to make even more of a scene.

Ah, yeah that makes it harder to toss them out on their ears.
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bluedahlia

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About 15 years ago I lived in a big group house with five other people and there was another house across the street with four roommates.  There were actually about fifty of us who hung out regularly and once a month we'd hold a party for everyone whose birthday fell in that month and parties normally floated from our house to the one across the street and back.  On my boyfriend's birthday (that he celebrated with four other people) he and I were standing in the kitchen talking to my best friend when this guy walked in, opened the refrigerator, grabbed two beers (one he opened and one he stuck in his jacket pocket) and leaned back on the counter and proceeded to hit on my best friend.  We all kind of looked at each other and best friend started questioning him.

Her: So, I haven't seen you around.  Are you here with someone?
Him: Yeah, the birthday boy.  Known him for years.
Her: Which one?
Him: B(mumbles)
Her: Brian?
Him: Yeah, Brian.  He called me asked me to come down.
Her:  It's not Brian's birthday till December.  It is HIS birthday (points at my boyfriend) and you haven't even given him your regards.  What a shame you'll have to leave before you can.

She then proceeded to drag him out by his collar while he protested that he knew one of the birthday people.  She assembled them all on the front porch and no one had any idea who he was.  None of our neighbors recognized him, either.  As it turned out he'd overheard one of the bartenders at the pub a few blocks away talking about coming after he got off work and invited himself along. 

Edited because "birthday" and "boyfriend" are two different things.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2011, 07:07:09 PM by bluedahlia »

gramma dishes

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I don't see Steve any more after that and a couple years later I move into a different area of town. 

Hi  - was walking one day and saw you come out of this house.  Needed a place to stay and knew you wouldn't mind if I crashed a couple days.  You didn't answer the door so I came in the window.  Thanks - Steve.


As you can guess, my neighbors had taken the money I had paid them for cat-sitting and hadn't bothered to check on them at all.  None of these people were ever invited back, although I am sure if Steve had needed a place to crash again it wouldn't have bothered him.

1.  It would frighten me that even though you now live in a totally different area of town from where  you lived when you actually "knew" Steve, that he 'saw you come out of this house'.  I think that sounds like stalking! 

I would  be more inclined to say he happened to be in the area one day and saw her coming out of her house.

Maybe 'stalking' was too strong a word.  Perhaps 'tracking' might be more appropriate.  Why am I inclined to think that?

1.  They had not seen or spoken to each other for at least two years before she even moved, so he would have no way of knowing THAT she had moved.

2.  Even if he heard "through the grapevine" that she had moved, he wouldn't have known where she'd moved.  A different area of the same city?  A different state altogether?  A different country?

3.  If he didn't already know she lived there and truly did just "happen" to see her leaving that house, he wouldn't have had any way of knowing that she wasn't just leaving a friend or family member's house!  He clearly knew it was hers, which means (to me) that he had to have been keeping tabs on her all that time.

camlan

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How have I missed this thread?!  We have:

1) The guest who never locked the bathroom door while she used the facilities and then acted indignant and offended when other guests opened the door. ("Did you realize someone was in there?"  "Couldn't you see the light under the door?!" "I shouldn't HAVE to lock the door, it's up to you to check if the room is occupied!")  She made such a fuss, it made the rest of the evening really awkward and uncomfortable.  She did this at two events, refused gentle prompting that she lock the door behind her. ("I shouldn't have to lock the door.  Just let everyone else know I'm in the bathroom if you see them heading down the hall!") 


Maybe this is a regional or cultural thing, but I've never locked a bathroom door in a private house, unless there were young, toddler aged children running around, who might open the door without knocking.

It's pretty much the custom in my area to knock on a closed bathroom door to determine if it is occupied. Usually, if the bathroom is empty, the door is open. If the door is closed, there's a good chance someone's in there. But it's also a possibility that someone just closed the door on an empty bathroom for some reason, so you knock to make sure.

However, once the guest was told she needed to lock the bathroom door, the consequences of not locking it were all on her. And if I were told that the custom of the house was to lock the bathroom door, I would definitely follow that custom.
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wolfie

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Maybe 'stalking' was too strong a word.  Perhaps 'tracking' might be more appropriate.  Why am I inclined to think that?

1.  They had not seen or spoken to each other for at least two years before she even moved, so he would have no way of knowing THAT she had moved.

2.  Even if he heard "through the grapevine" that she had moved, he wouldn't have known where she'd moved.  A different area of the same city?  A different state altogether?  A different country?

3.  If he didn't already know she lived there and truly did just "happen" to see her leaving that house, he wouldn't have had any way of knowing that she wasn't just leaving a friend or family member's house!  He clearly knew it was hers, which means (to me) that he had to have been keeping tabs on her all that time.

Hopefully the poster will come back and clarify but I got the impression he was an idiot and assumed she lived there and didn't really have much of a basis for that. Maybe he did hear that she moved and so figured that had to be her house when he saw her there without stopping to think that she could just be visiting someone. Anyone who is willing to throw a brick through the window of an almost stranger and stay there for a few days isn't exactly high on the logic department.

Diane AKA Traska

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3.  If he didn't already know she lived there and truly did just "happen" to see her leaving that house, he wouldn't have had any way of knowing that she wasn't just leaving a friend or family member's house!  He clearly knew it was hers, which means (to me) that he had to have been keeping tabs on her all that time.

It all would depend on how much he saw.  If he saw her come out, put keys into the lock, lock the door, and go into the garage to get her car and pull out... that's a pretty good indicator of at least strong familiarity, if not ownership of said house.

But yeah, I don't think it's totally innocent either.
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Celany

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Anyone who is willing to throw a brick through the window of an almost stranger and stay there for a few days isn't exactly high on the logic department.

Word. I'm still trying to wrap my mind around the concept that anybody could this is OK. And...and if I still lived there, and I were the OP, then I think I'd be really really nervous about ever leaving my home unattended again.
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Bethczar

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How have I missed this thread?!  We have:

1) The guest who never locked the bathroom door while she used the facilities and then acted indignant and offended when other guests opened the door. ("Did you realize someone was in there?"  "Couldn't you see the light under the door?!" "I shouldn't HAVE to lock the door, it's up to you to check if the room is occupied!")  She made such a fuss, it made the rest of the evening really awkward and uncomfortable.  She did this at two events, refused gentle prompting that she lock the door behind her. ("I shouldn't have to lock the door.  Just let everyone else know I'm in the bathroom if you see them heading down the hall!") 


Maybe this is a regional or cultural thing, but I've never locked a bathroom door in a private house, unless there were young, toddler aged children running around, who might open the door without knocking.

It's pretty much the custom in my area to knock on a closed bathroom door to determine if it is occupied. Usually, if the bathroom is empty, the door is open. If the door is closed, there's a good chance someone's in there. But it's also a possibility that someone just closed the door on an empty bathroom for some reason, so you knock to make sure.

However, once the guest was told she needed to lock the bathroom door, the consequences of not locking it were all on her. And if I were told that the custom of the house was to lock the bathroom door, I would definitely follow that custom.
Yes, I was confused by that, too. Closed=occupied, open=free. I've never locked the door, although if asked to, I would.

kitty-cat

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How have I missed this thread?!  We have:

1) The guest who never locked the bathroom door while she used the facilities and then acted indignant and offended when other guests opened the door. ("Did you realize someone was in there?"  "Couldn't you see the light under the door?!" "I shouldn't HAVE to lock the door, it's up to you to check if the room is occupied!")  She made such a fuss, it made the rest of the evening really awkward and uncomfortable.  She did this at two events, refused gentle prompting that she lock the door behind her. ("I shouldn't have to lock the door.  Just let everyone else know I'm in the bathroom if you see them heading down the hall!") 


Maybe this is a regional or cultural thing, but I've never locked a bathroom door in a private house, unless there were young, toddler aged children running around, who might open the door without knocking.

It's pretty much the custom in my area to knock on a closed bathroom door to determine if it is occupied. Usually, if the bathroom is empty, the door is open. If the door is closed, there's a good chance someone's in there. But it's also a possibility that someone just closed the door on an empty bathroom for some reason, so you knock to make sure.

However, once the guest was told she needed to lock the bathroom door, the consequences of not locking it were all on her. And if I were told that the custom of the house was to lock the bathroom door, I would definitely follow that custom.

I always knock because I have to keep mine closed at home- the dogs here are rather, how should I say, "fond" of trashcan treats and the door closed prevents it.

My own story, is rather my stepdads. My stepsister had a friend once that would not listen to anything that my SD told her. The most egregious example would be Popsicle rule numbers 1 and 2. 1: don't eat them on the white couches. 2: have a paper towel with you when you eat them. "Vanessa" broke both rules with a red popsicle and was all "whatever" when asked about it.

Never did see her again.




NE Florida

suzieQ

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Back when DH was BF, I had my best friend and her SO over (don't remember if they were just dating or engaged by then)

Anyway, I had really good hearing and was rather squicked out by them being all over each other while we were trying to visit with them. I could hear her whispering highly inappropriate things to him. (inappropriate for me to hear anyway. I'm pretty sure she didn't realize I could hear it and I was too embarrassed to say anything)

Well their game of touchy-feely kept progressing until she asked me to borrow my Mother and Dad's bed!  :-X (I still lived at home and parents were out of town)

I had no spine at the time and let them use the bed, while BF and I went to my room since it was on the opposite end of the house. I could hear WAY more than I wanted, even then, so we left and got some ice cream.

Put a sign on the bedroom door to keep my brother from walking in on them if he came home before I got back. Didn't invite them over again but we are still friends.
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kingsrings

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When we were college-aged, my brother and I hosted a few parties at our house. Because there was copious amounts of alcohol involved, trouble ensued sometimes. Our first party, one gal had bought her own alcohol to supplement the keg provided, and proceeded to get blotto, then toss her cookies onto a guy's expensive jacket - and our sofa that was it was sitting under. When she called the next day to retrieve her purse, she had no clue what she did until I told her. She was very embarrassed and apologetic, but that was it. We made a vow to never invite her over again, even though we were on good terms with her.

Not that I ever host anything now, but that is one of the reasons why nobody would be allowed to drink too much at my place if I did.

Gabrielle

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How have I missed this thread?!  We have:

1) The guest who never locked the bathroom door while she used the facilities and then acted indignant and offended when other guests opened the door. ("Did you realize someone was in there?"  "Couldn't you see the light under the door?!" "I shouldn't HAVE to lock the door, it's up to you to check if the room is occupied!")  She made such a fuss, it made the rest of the evening really awkward and uncomfortable.  She did this at two events, refused gentle prompting that she lock the door behind her. ("I shouldn't have to lock the door.  Just let everyone else know I'm in the bathroom if you see them heading down the hall!") 


Maybe this is a regional or cultural thing, but I've never locked a bathroom door in a private house, unless there were young, toddler aged children running around, who might open the door without knocking.

It's pretty much the custom in my area to knock on a closed bathroom door to determine if it is occupied. Usually, if the bathroom is empty, the door is open. If the door is closed, there's a good chance someone's in there. But it's also a possibility that someone just closed the door on an empty bathroom for some reason, so you knock to make sure.

However, once the guest was told she needed to lock the bathroom door, the consequences of not locking it were all on her. And if I were told that the custom of the house was to lock the bathroom door, I would definitely follow that custom.
Yes, I was confused by that, too. Closed=occupied, open=free. I've never locked the door, although if asked to, I would.

Completely the opposite where I live. The wind blows doors closed if you leave them open so standard procedure is if the door is locked, it's occupied. I find it very strange when people don't lock the bathroom door if the option is there.

shhh its me

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3.  If he didn't already know she lived there and truly did just "happen" to see her leaving that house, he wouldn't have had any way of knowing that she wasn't just leaving a friend or family member's house!  He clearly knew it was hers, which means (to me) that he had to have been keeping tabs on her all that time.

It all would depend on how much he saw.  If he saw her come out, put keys into the lock, lock the door, and go into the garage to get her car and pull out... that's a pretty good indicator of at least strong familiarity, if not ownership of said house.

But yeah, I don't think it's totally innocent either.

I was about to post the same thing and then thought maybe he was a guest of OP's at some point at her previous home and recognized the furniture or the cats.  I'm going with seeing someone leave a house once is not a reason to conclude they live there.*even if their car does come out of the garage.  It doesn't really matter how bizarre and frightening.

zyrs

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Maybe 'stalking' was too strong a word.  Perhaps 'tracking' might be more appropriate.  Why am I inclined to think that?

1.  They had not seen or spoken to each other for at least two years before she even moved, so he would have no way of knowing THAT she had moved.

2.  Even if he heard "through the grapevine" that she had moved, he wouldn't have known where she'd moved.  A different area of the same city?  A different state altogether?  A different country?

3.  If he didn't already know she lived there and truly did just "happen" to see her leaving that house, he wouldn't have had any way of knowing that she wasn't just leaving a friend or family member's house!  He clearly knew it was hers, which means (to me) that he had to have been keeping tabs on her all that time.

Hopefully the poster will come back and clarify but I got the impression he was an idiot and assumed she lived there and didn't really have much of a basis for that. Maybe he did hear that she moved and so figured that had to be her house when he saw her there without stopping to think that she could just be visiting someone. Anyone who is willing to throw a brick through the window of an almost stranger and stay there for a few days isn't exactly high on the logic department.

"Steve" was a few fires short of a happy meal.  He wasn't really capable of extended thinking.  So yes, he wasn't really high in logic.

And, I'm male.  He was a friend of a friend.

And @ Celany:  yeah, I haven't left my house unattended for long times for years now.  Mainly because of this incident.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2011, 12:04:10 AM by zyrs »