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Author Topic: ". . . And s/he was NOT invited back!" - share your rudest guest stories  (Read 211994 times)

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Margo

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Re: ". . . And s/he was NOT invited back!" - share your rudest guest stories
« Reply #330 on: December 09, 2013, 04:50:27 AM »
Wow! I would have been tempted to tell 4th roommate that as they were his/her parents / guests it was his/her responsibility to make sure that the place was tidied to his/her standards.

(It may be, of course, that the parents were critical of their own child, and never expected or intended the comments to be passed on, so it seems to me that it was the room mate, not the guests, who were rude)

Venus193

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Re: ". . . And s/he was NOT invited back!" - share your rudest guest stories
« Reply #331 on: December 09, 2013, 06:01:55 AM »
Germans being neat freaks isn't a cliche for nothing.  My mother would have pulled the White Glove Inspection routine with me if she didn't balk at the stairs necessary to get to my pad.  However, that does not excuse the rudeness of criticizing a place not sterile as an operating room.





TheaterDiva1

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Re: ". . . And s/he was NOT invited back!" - share your rudest guest stories
« Reply #332 on: December 09, 2013, 06:47:14 AM »
I'm proud to say that my MIL actually called her sister (Cousin's mum) and asked her what the hell her daughter was thinking when she did that. I didn't ask her to, in fact it was DH who told her the story in the first place, but I did get a lovely phone call from DH's aunty apologising for her daughters' behaviour.
Aunty is welcome at our house. Cousin is NOT.

Why did your MIL call her sister/cousin's mother?  Cousin's old enough to be accountable for get actions - why didn't they call her directly?

blue2000

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Re: ". . . And s/he was NOT invited back!" - share your rudest guest stories
« Reply #333 on: December 09, 2013, 07:25:45 AM »
My mother would have simply recleaned the place. Most people think that's a great idea. Trust me, it's not.
You are only young once. After that you have to think up some other excuse.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: ". . . And s/he was NOT invited back!" - share your rudest guest stories
« Reply #334 on: December 09, 2013, 08:54:21 AM »
Germans being neat freaks isn't a cliche for nothing.  My mother would have pulled the White Glove Inspection routine with me if she didn't balk at the stairs necessary to get to my pad.  However, that does not excuse the rudeness of criticizing a place not sterile as an operating room.

I've heard the cliche that Dutch folks are clean freaks but I hadn't heard that about German folks.  Certainly explains a lot of my mother's tendancies and why she was always after me to make my bed and tidy my room.  Also explains why I feel such anxiety about the state of my house but I don't have the energy to clean it.  I'm working on decluttering so I can hire someone to clean regularly.

Reminds me of when I was looking for my first apartment.  My parents were with me and we went into one place.  The landlord complained about the previous tenant blocking off the door to the landloard's portion of the house (it was a basement apartment).  There were all these rules and it seemed like the landlord would be in the place without notice, giving it the white glove treatment.  I would have been expected to look after her dogs when she was away but I couldn't have a cat.  No wonder the previous tenant blocked off the door!  When we got out to the car, my Dad asked me what I thought of the place with a bit of a smirk in his voice.  I looked at my Mom and said, 'It'd be worse than living at home.'  They both burst out laughing.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

Tini

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Re: ". . . And s/he was NOT invited back!" - share your rudest guest stories
« Reply #335 on: December 09, 2013, 03:18:48 PM »
Honestly, there is as much of a range in Germany when it comes to neatness as anywhere. I'm middling tidy (frankly, I think there's been few people who on their deathbeds looked up to the heavens and said "I wish I tidied up more"), my one sister is quite messy by nature and only tidied up her act because she married a man with asperger's and a bit of ocd, my other sister isn't much better. I think it's just an easy out for German neat-freaks to blame it on their Germanness. The others don't mention it :-P.

I certainly have never heard of anyone giving a white-glove inspection to any place. Saying that, my dad can be a bit annoying about stupid things (like making remarks about my basement looking like "a robber's cave") when it comes to tidiness, but I told him that it's none of his business how I keep my house. Politely.

Pen^2

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Re: ". . . And s/he was NOT invited back!" - share your rudest guest stories
« Reply #336 on: December 09, 2013, 03:53:27 PM »
I may have told this story before, but I remember having my parents stay with us for a week after my first child was born.  My mother asked if she could invite a friend over, and I said "Sure."  Mum said reassuringly "Don't worry about the place looking so messy.  I explained to my friend that you can't be expected to keep a tidy house when you've just had a baby."   :o

Thing is, I'm sure she was trying to be nice - but all she did was hurt my feelings terribly, because I had been trying to keep a tidy(ish) house - all while sleep-deprived and worrying myself sick about whether or not the baby was doing well.  I didn't have dirty dishes anywhere, nor was there laundry piled up on the chairs - but the fact that it wouldn't have passed the white-glove test translated to "messy" in Mum's mine.  Sigh.

There must be a term for this. It's like an unintentional back-handed compliment. I've had so many of these, there simply needs to be a word for it.

Desdemona

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Re: ". . . And s/he was NOT invited back!" - share your rudest guest stories
« Reply #337 on: December 09, 2013, 04:12:11 PM »
I may have told this story before, but I remember having my parents stay with us for a week after my first child was born.  My mother asked if she could invite a friend over, and I said "Sure."  Mum said reassuringly "Don't worry about the place looking so messy.  I explained to my friend that you can't be expected to keep a tidy house when you've just had a baby."   :o

Thing is, I'm sure she was trying to be nice - but all she did was hurt my feelings terribly, because I had been trying to keep a tidy(ish) house - all while sleep-deprived and worrying myself sick about whether or not the baby was doing well.  I didn't have dirty dishes anywhere, nor was there laundry piled up on the chairs - but the fact that it wouldn't have passed the white-glove test translated to "messy" in Mum's mine.  Sigh.

There must be a term for this. It's like an unintentional back-handed compliment. I've had so many of these, there simply needs to be a word for it.

In the Bridget Jones's Diary books they call them jellyfish. I've always thought it was a great term for an unexpected sting.

Jocelyn

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Re: ". . . And s/he was NOT invited back!" - share your rudest guest stories
« Reply #338 on: December 09, 2013, 04:46:21 PM »
Honestly, there is as much of a range in Germany when it comes to neatness as anywhere.  ly.
That may be true indoors, but it DID strike me (and the family members traveling with me) that Germany was exceptionally neat. Not only did we not see litter, we didn't see junk piled around houses or garages, and nearly every house had brilliantly colored flowers in pots or gardens. We wondered if maybe our German relatives were setting us up, until one day we wandered off the beaten path, and yes, everything was as postcard-perfect in those towns. The only time we saw shabby was the day we crossed into the former East Germany. But I suppose if your family has been living in this town since the Middle Ages, you feel some obligation to keep up standards for the neighbors. :)

PastryGoddess

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Re: ". . . And s/he was NOT invited back!" - share your rudest guest stories
« Reply #339 on: December 09, 2013, 05:08:32 PM »
I may have told this story before, but I remember having my parents stay with us for a week after my first child was born.  My mother asked if she could invite a friend over, and I said "Sure."  Mum said reassuringly "Don't worry about the place looking so messy.  I explained to my friend that you can't be expected to keep a tidy house when you've just had a baby."   :o

Thing is, I'm sure she was trying to be nice - but all she did was hurt my feelings terribly, because I had been trying to keep a tidy(ish) house - all while sleep-deprived and worrying myself sick about whether or not the baby was doing well.  I didn't have dirty dishes anywhere, nor was there laundry piled up on the chairs - but the fact that it wouldn't have passed the white-glove test translated to "messy" in Mum's mine.  Sigh.

There must be a term for this. It's like an unintentional back-handed compliment. I've had so many of these, there simply needs to be a word for it.

In the Bridget Jones's Diary books they call them jellyfish. I've always thought it was a great term for an unexpected sting.


Yeah, I was going to say Jellyfish as well.

Margo

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Re: ". . . And s/he was NOT invited back!" - share your rudest guest stories
« Reply #340 on: December 11, 2013, 06:02:29 AM »
I may have told this story before, but I remember having my parents stay with us for a week after my first child was born.  My mother asked if she could invite a friend over, and I said "Sure."  Mum said reassuringly "Don't worry about the place looking so messy.  I explained to my friend that you can't be expected to keep a tidy house when you've just had a baby."   :o

Thing is, I'm sure she was trying to be nice - but all she did was hurt my feelings terribly, because I had been trying to keep a tidy(ish) house - all while sleep-deprived and worrying myself sick about whether or not the baby was doing well.  I didn't have dirty dishes anywhere, nor was there laundry piled up on the chairs - but the fact that it wouldn't have passed the white-glove test translated to "messy" in Mum's mine.  Sigh.

There must be a term for this. It's like an unintentional back-handed compliment. I've had so many of these, there simply needs to be a word for it.

not a single word, but "damning with faint praise" springs to mind..