Author Topic: Used it at work today--A Vet's Office Story  (Read 8052 times)

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PitBullMom

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Used it at work today--A Vet's Office Story
« on: August 08, 2009, 02:23:50 PM »
BG:  I work at a vet's office.  We have several SS clients.  One in particular has a cat who had surgery yesterday.  Everything had gone well and he was doing great upon discharge, yesterday afternoon.  Today, SS client called, frantic, describing "odd" behavior in her cat and insisted that she talk to the vet who did the surgery, Dr. Tina.  We generally try to handle phone calls from clients before handing them over to the Dr.'s because, if not, the Dr.'s would be on the phone all day and not getting anything done at the office.  I was on the phone with her, and this is how it went. /BG

SS Client:  My cat it acting so weird!!  I need to talk to Tina!
PitBullMom:  What is his behavior?
SSC:  Well, he, blah, blah, blah (nothing really major and not an emergency)
PBM:  Is he eating/drinking and going to the bathroom normally?
SSC:  Yes, but...(more behavior descriptions and nothing harmful, dangerous, or concerning)
PBM:  If he's eating/drinking, etc normally, then there's nothing to worry about.  It can take up to 36 hours for the drugs to wear off.  It sounds like he's still a bit drugged from yesterday.
SSC:  Well, what if I have an emergency and I have to bring him in?  Can I see Tina?
PBM:  If you bring him in before noon (closing time), you can certainly be seen by Dr. Tina.  If you feel he has to come in after that time, you will need to take him to the emergency clinic.
SSC:  I can't do that!  They don't know him there!  If I take him in later, I'll need to see, or at least talk to, Dr. Tina!
PBM:  I am afraid that won't be possible after 12:00.  That is when we close.  You are welcome to bring him in between now and then, but Dr. Tina will not be available from noon today until Monday morning.  (It was a rare weekend off for her.)
SSC:  But I'll need a way to get ahold of her after hours!  I'll need to speak with her if something happens!!
PBM:  Dr. Tina will not be available after 12:00 today.  You are welcome to come in before then or go to the e-clinic after we close.

By this time SSC is rather frantic and practically crying on the phone about the "what ifs" when, in fact, her cat was fine and, like I told her, she could come in before noon and be seen.  What she wanted was for me to say, "Here's Dr. Tina's personal number.  Go ahead and call her whenever you like later today/tomorrow and tell her of your concerns.  She may even meet you here at the clinic if you want your cat to be seen."  However, I was not about to do this.  I had described everything SSC told me to Dr. Tina, and she assured me that the cat was fine as long as he was eating/drinking and using the bathroom normally.  Any other odd behavior was to be considered normal for at least 36 hours post-surgery.  (At this time, it hadn't even been 24 hours.)  If, in fact, there was something truly wrong with her cat after closing, the e-clinic would be open and she could take him there.  We weren't going to leave her high and dry.

I let her rant for a bit, and when she calmed down, she demanded asked to speak to Dr. Tina over the phone.

PBM:  I'm sorry, that won't be possible.  She is in a room right now seeing another patient.  I can have her call you back as soon as she's finished.
SSC:  OK, that will be fine.

So, Dr. Tina called SSC back and told her everything I had told her during the previous conversation.  The end result was that SSC would be coming in before noon to have her cat looked at despite being reassured that he was fine.  Interestingly enough, she never showed up.  <shrug>  I guess it wasn't that important after all.
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JoieGirl7

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Re: Used it at work today--A Vet's Office Story
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2009, 02:35:48 PM »
BG:  I work at a vet's office.  We have several SS clients.  One in particular has a cat who had surgery yesterday.  Everything had gone well and he was doing great upon discharge, yesterday afternoon.  Today, SS client called, frantic, describing "odd" behavior in her cat and insisted that she talk to the vet who did the surgery, Dr. Tina.  We generally try to handle phone calls from clients before handing them over to the Dr.'s because, if not, the Dr.'s would be on the phone all day and not getting anything done at the office.  I was on the phone with her, and this is how it went. /BG

SS Client:  My cat it acting so weird!!  I need to talk to Tina!
PitBullMom:  What is his behavior?
SSC:  Well, he, blah, blah, blah (nothing really major and not an emergency)
PBM:  Is he eating/drinking and going to the bathroom normally?
SSC:  Yes, but...(more behavior descriptions and nothing harmful, dangerous, or concerning)
PBM:  If he's eating/drinking, etc normally, then there's nothing to worry about.  It can take up to 36 hours for the drugs to wear off.  It sounds like he's still a bit drugged from yesterday.
SSC:  Well, what if I have an emergency and I have to bring him in?  Can I see Tina?
PBM:  If you bring him in before noon (closing time), you can certainly be seen by Dr. Tina.  If you feel he has to come in after that time, you will need to take him to the emergency clinic.
SSC:  I can't do that!  They don't know him there!  If I take him in later, I'll need to see, or at least talk to, Dr. Tina!
PBM:  I am afraid that won't be possible after 12:00.  That is when we close.  You are welcome to bring him in between now and then, but Dr. Tina will not be available from noon today until Monday morning.  (It was a rare weekend off for her.)
SSC:  But I'll need a way to get ahold of her after hours!  I'll need to speak with her if something happens!!
PBM:  Dr. Tina will not be available after 12:00 today.  You are welcome to come in before then or go to the e-clinic after we close.

By this time SSC is rather frantic and practically crying on the phone about the "what ifs" when, in fact, her cat was fine and, like I told her, she could come in before noon and be seen.  What she wanted was for me to say, "Here's Dr. Tina's personal number.  Go ahead and call her whenever you like later today/tomorrow and tell her of your concerns.  She may even meet you here at the clinic if you want your cat to be seen."  However, I was not about to do this.  I had described everything SSC told me to Dr. Tina, and she assured me that the cat was fine as long as he was eating/drinking and using the bathroom normally.  Any other odd behavior was to be considered normal for at least 36 hours post-surgery.  (At this time, it hadn't even been 24 hours.)  If, in fact, there was something truly wrong with her cat after closing, the e-clinic would be open and she could take him there.  We weren't going to leave her high and dry.

I let her rant for a bit, and when she calmed down, she demanded asked to speak to Dr. Tina over the phone.

PBM:  I'm sorry, that won't be possible.  She is in a room right now seeing another patient.  I can have her call you back as soon as she's finished.
SSC:  OK, that will be fine.

So, Dr. Tina called SSC back and told her everything I had told her during the previous conversation.  The end result was that SSC would be coming in before noon to have her cat looked at despite being reassured that he was fine.  Interestingly enough, she never showed up.  <shrug>  I guess it wasn't that important after all.

And somehow it seems as if you could have told her that at the beginning.
 
Instead you assume that she is an SS client and wants something out of the ordinary as in wanting the doc's personal number, wanting to talk with the doc after hours and wanting to bring in her pet after hours.
 
But, it appears that all she wanted was to be able to communicate with the doctor.  I can't understand why you wouldn't just leave a message for the doc and let the doc decide whether or not the customer needs a call or whether a call back from you with information is enough.
 
There was no reason to give her the runaround and upset the cat owner the way that you did.
 
The phrase is not really meant to be used that way.  She wanted to talk to the doc and that was, in fact, possible.

PitBullMom

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Re: Used it at work today--A Vet's Office Story
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2009, 02:55:54 PM »
And somehow it seems as if you could have told her that at the beginning.
 
Instead you assume that she is an SS client and wants something out of the ordinary as in wanting the doc's personal number, wanting to talk with the doc after hours and wanting to bring in her pet after hours.
 
But, it appears that all she wanted was to be able to communicate with the doctor.  I can't understand why you wouldn't just leave a message for the doc and let the doc decide whether or not the customer needs a call or whether a call back from you with information is enough.
 
There was no reason to give her the runaround and upset the cat owner the way that you did.
 
The phrase is not really meant to be used that way.  She wanted to talk to the doc and that was, in fact, possible.

This particular client has asked for the bolded part in the past before. 

I had told her in the beginning of the conversation that I described her cat's behavior to the Dr. and was relaying information that she had told me (including the Dr being willing to see her before we closed).  I did not give her the runaround, nor did I upset her.  She was already upset on the phone and, I didn't mention it because I didn't think it was relevant, she told me on the phone that she had been drinking this morning. 

The client did, in fact, ask for "something not possible" by insisting the Dr. be available for her after hours.  Perhaps this didn't come across in my post, but she was being a bully and rather demanding.  For some reason, coming in before closing or going to the e-clinic weren't satisfactory options for her.

I was very polite with her on the phone and even empathized with her when she was worried about her cat.  I politely gave her acceptable options.  How was I wrong?  (Truly curious, not snarky.  It is sometimes challenging to be polite in my line of work.)
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VorFemme

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Re: Used it at work today--A Vet's Office Story
« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2009, 04:45:58 PM »
The OP heard the tone of voice over the phone (and I'm sure has spoken to the woman before, when the cat has come in at other times) - so she has a bit more background in her experience than can easily be put into the post.

Although the words "and this isn't the first time that the woman has tried something like this" might let us know that there is HISTORY involved.

Pulling this kind of stunt once might be concern for the cat - pulling it repeatedly shows a pattern of behavior that might indeed indicate SS tendencies.   But that's because I have run into a few ss in my 52 years on earth...........
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JoieGirl7

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Re: Used it at work today--A Vet's Office Story
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2009, 05:14:54 PM »
OP,
The story you told did not involve you interacting with the doctor at all.

The impression was that you took the phone call, stonewalled the woman so that the doctor would not be bothered, the woman became very upset and then, for some reason, at the end of the call, she is simply satisfied that the doc will call her back.
 
The impression that you gave was that she was being unreasonable, but there is no evidence to this in your post.  I can understand that someone whose pet has just had surgery would be cautious and concerned about behavioral changes and would want to speak with the doctor.
 
You can see where leaving out the part where you did share the woman's call with the doc and presumably shared that with her changes the story quite a bit.
 
I am not so concerned with the "history."  The cat just had surgery, so it is a legitimate time of concern whether or not this woman has a history of asking for special favors or not.
 
Leaving out certain things can completely change the context of a story.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2009, 06:09:55 PM by Ckimoo65 »

Micah

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Re: Used it at work today--A Vet's Office Story
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2009, 06:05:19 PM »
 
 What she wanted was for me to say, "Here's Dr. Tina's personal number.  Go ahead and call her whenever you like later today/tomorrow and tell her of your concerns.  She may even meet you here at the clinic if you want your cat to be seen."  However, I was not about to do this.  I had described everything SSC told me to Dr. Tina, and she assured me that the cat was fine as long as he was eating/drinking and using the bathroom normally. 
[/quo

This sounds to me like she did communicate with the vet during the call.

 
 
 
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JoieGirl7

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Re: Used it at work today--A Vet's Office Story
« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2009, 06:23:31 PM »
 
 What she wanted was for me to say, "Here's Dr. Tina's personal number.  Go ahead and call her whenever you like later today/tomorrow and tell her of your concerns.  She may even meet you here at the clinic if you want your cat to be seen."  However, I was not about to do this.  I had described everything SSC told me to Dr. Tina, and she assured me that the cat was fine as long as he was eating/drinking and using the bathroom normally.  

This sounds to me like she did communicate with the vet during the call.



I modified.  But, at the same time there is nothing in the original that this interaction was relayed to the client.
 
Honsetly, she sounds like a concerned cat owner and I can't see that what she did was rude.
 
It kind of gets to me that people will come here and vent about work situations interacting with the public as if they are social interactions which they are not.  Presumably there is some sort of office policy in place to determine how to handle concerned pet owners.
 
"I'm afraid that won't be possible" is a phrase used to shut someone down.  It's a little disturbing to me that one would want to do that to a concerned client.  What would seem more productive would be to tell the client what is possible rather than trying to shut them down.  In these situations, I just don't think its that polite.  I certainly don't see it as a kind of victory over a rude person.
 
For the social interaction, saying that phrase creates a kind of policy in a way that helps strengthen an individuals ability to stand their ground.  In business, you can say it, but there most likely policies in place that one can point to repeatedly without having to try and shut a person down like this.
 
« Last Edit: August 08, 2009, 07:20:22 PM by Ckimoo65 »

PitBullMom

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Re: Used it at work today--A Vet's Office Story
« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2009, 06:56:31 PM »
I apologize for not giving more history about this client and for being a bit unclear about what actually happened.  I was trying to keep my post succinct and to the point and I left out some important details along the way.

I had not taken the call originally.  The receptionist took it, put the client on hold, relayed the call to both the Dr. and myself, and then the Dr. had me take the call to relay info to the client.

What I was trying to say in my original post (which somehow got lost) was that the client only wanted to hear one thing:  for the Dr. to be available off hours.  That was not possible.  I gave her 2 options instead:  come in before closing or go to the e-clinic after hours.  These 2 options were not good enough for this client and she wanted special treatment.

I certainly wasn't trying to shut down a concerned pet owner, although I can see now how it may have appeared that way.  However, I did use the phrase after I had given her the 2 possible options that were not to her liking and she had gotten snippy with me.

Her being concerned about her cat wasn't rude.  Her calling and describing unusual behavior wasn't rude.  Her wanting to talk to the Dr. wasn't rude.  However, I stand by that her bullying demeanor and demanding special treatment was rude.  By using, "That won't be possible," I was attempting to politely let her know that the Dr. wouldn't be available in the way that the client wanted.

Live and learn, I suppose.  :)

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ccnumber4

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Re: Used it at work today--A Vet's Office Story
« Reply #8 on: August 08, 2009, 07:09:46 PM »
I actually agree with Ckimoo on this one.  She didn't sound like a SS to me, she sounded like a concerned pet parent.  Your OP describes her as "frantic and crying". 
B
By this time SSC is rather frantic and practically crying on the phone about the "what ifs" when, in fact, her cat was fine and, like I told her, she could come in before noon and be seen. 
 

I feel better talking to our actual vet as well, not just a tech  I understand they are competent and qualified, doesn't mean I wouldn't feel better talking to the person who actually performed the surgery. 

Of course you heard her tone, we didn't.  But the exchange posted in the OP doesn't seem all that out of line to me.  She was frantic and almost crying.  I think there may be more you could have done to at least not escalate the situation, if not help her.   

Joeschmo

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Re: Used it at work today--A Vet's Office Story
« Reply #9 on: August 08, 2009, 07:13:09 PM »
 
 What she wanted was for me to say, "Here's Dr. Tina's personal number.  Go ahead and call her whenever you like later today/tomorrow and tell her of your concerns.  She may even meet you here at the clinic if you want your cat to be seen."  However, I was not about to do this.  I had described everything SSC told me to Dr. Tina, and she assured me that the cat was fine as long as he was eating/drinking and using the bathroom normally.  
[/quo

This sounds to me like she did communicate with the vet during the call.



I modified.  But, at the same time there is nothing in the original that this interaction was relayed to the client.
 
Honsetly, she sounds like a concerned cat owner and I can't see that what she did was rude.
 
It kind of gets to me that people will come here and vent about work situations interacting with the public as if they are social interactions which they are not.  Presumably there is some sort of office policy in place to determine how to handle concerned pet owners.
 
"I'm afraid that won't be possible" is a phrase used to shut someone down.  It's a little disturbing to me that one would want to do that to a concerned client.  What would seem more productive would be to tell the client what is possible rather than trying to shut them down.  In these situations, I just don't think its that polite.  I certainly don't see it as a kind of victory over a rude person.
 
For the social interaction, saying that phrase creates a kind of policy in a way that helps strengthen an individuals ability to stand their ground.  In business, you can say it, but there most likely policies in place that one can point to repeatedly without having to try and shut a person down like this.
 


It seems to me that she did give the woman options, they weren't the options the woman wanted so "that's not possible" had to be used when the woman repeatedly requested to have her vet work on her weekend off.  The woman in the OP seemed to not be happy with any answer that allowed Dr. Tina to enjoy her weekend off and declined to come in while Dr. Tina was there.  I hope for the best for the lady and her cat but she, nor her cat, is not so special that she can't go to see the assumedly competent doctors at the emergency clinic.

Edited to add:
I think more background would have been helpful but it is a fine line for new posters between getting called out for leaving out background and providing too many details.  I have frequently started to post and been so worried about it I end up deleting or retyping it ten times(like this reply) because I'm afraid to upset someone with the way I post.

As to the OP I've had customers like this in the pharmacy who only want to talk to the Pharmacist about things that I can easily handle on my own or ask the busy pharmacist myself then relay back to the customer.  When I had customers who called frequently with questions like "The sticker on my prescription says not to take other drugs without consulting my pharmacist so can I still use Chapstick?" I began to remember them and unfortunately I would become a little less patient with them as would the pharmacist.  These were customers I would attempt to relay the answer back to rather than have the pharmacist on the phone for ten minutes while the counter started to back up.

When I read the OP I assumed previous expierences with this patient that set the precedent that she was a Special Snowflake and was being treated as such.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2009, 07:28:20 PM by mango »

Pinky830

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Re: Used it at work today--A Vet's Office Story
« Reply #10 on: August 08, 2009, 10:10:51 PM »
OP, now that I've read all of your posts, I think you did just fine. I'm a DVM, and I know *exactly* what you're talking about. In a perfect world, I would be an unstoppable android who could be at a pet owner's beck and call 24/7. In this one, I have an emergency clinic (well, I work at a 24-hour hospital now, so an emergency staff) whom I trust absolutely. (I tell people all the time, "Dr. X is working tonight. She's awesome. I would trust my pets with her in a heartbeat" and I mean it.) I also have a family and a life and by the time I've worked a 10-hour day and I'm dead on my feet, one of my colleagues has just gotten to work and is ready to handle whatever my clients need.

When I read your first post, my first thought was "postsurgical patient, worried owner, I would have expected her to get me, out of the exam room if needed," but your follow-ups made it clear that it was one of those "nobody exists but meeee" people. We do the best we possibly can for them, and that's all we can do.

bduckie

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Re: Used it at work today--A Vet's Office Story
« Reply #11 on: August 30, 2009, 07:18:23 AM »
What customers like this do not understand is if you called the vet out every time someone asked for them, you would never be able to make an appointment as the vet wouldn't have time to see anyone. There is a reason that vet nurses are trained.

My best friend is a vet, and there is something about animals that make people go bizarre (like calling the 24 hour, on call service at 3am to make an appointment for a vaccination  ::)  true story, and sadly not a one off)
I don't know where everyone got the idea that life was meant to be fair, but they sure got a bad deal with that message. Once you know fairness is not required, is not compulsory, and in fact often has nothing to do with anything, you can get on with it.

RingTailedLemur

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Re: Used it at work today--A Vet's Office Story
« Reply #12 on: August 30, 2009, 03:17:30 PM »
 
 What she wanted was for me to say, "Here's Dr. Tina's personal number.  Go ahead and call her whenever you like later today/tomorrow and tell her of your concerns.  She may even meet you here at the clinic if you want your cat to be seen."  However, I was not about to do this.  I had described everything SSC told me to Dr. Tina, and she assured me that the cat was fine as long as he was eating/drinking and using the bathroom normally.  

This sounds to me like she did communicate with the vet during the call.



I modified.  But, at the same time there is nothing in the original that this interaction was relayed to the client.
 
Honsetly, she sounds like a concerned cat owner and I can't see that what she did was rude.
 
It kind of gets to me that people will come here and vent about work situations interacting with the public as if they are social interactions which they are not.  Presumably there is some sort of office policy in place to determine how to handle concerned pet owners.
 
"I'm afraid that won't be possible" is a phrase used to shut someone down.  It's a little disturbing to me that one would want to do that to a concerned client.  What would seem more productive would be to tell the client what is possible rather than trying to shut them down.  In these situations, I just don't think its that polite.  I certainly don't see it as a kind of victory over a rude person.
 
For the social interaction, saying that phrase creates a kind of policy in a way that helps strengthen an individuals ability to stand their ground.  In business, you can say it, but there most likely policies in place that one can point to repeatedly without having to try and shut a person down like this.
 


I disagree with you, strongly.  The owner described what the cat was doing, and the OP explained that this was normal post-op behaviour and everything was fine.  It's her job to know this, and to stop the vet having to handle 500 calls a day when they could instead be in surgery or doing something more useful.  It's the OP's job to know what is going on with pets and how they should be - there was no reason for the owner to keep going on and on and on.  I find that attitude that only a single vet can ever be consulted quite irritating - answering questions like this is what the OP is paid for.

JoieGirl7

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Re: Used it at work today--A Vet's Office Story
« Reply #13 on: August 30, 2009, 03:45:22 PM »
 
 What she wanted was for me to say, "Here's Dr. Tina's personal number.  Go ahead and call her whenever you like later today/tomorrow and tell her of your concerns.  She may even meet you here at the clinic if you want your cat to be seen."  However, I was not about to do this.  I had described everything SSC told me to Dr. Tina, and she assured me that the cat was fine as long as he was eating/drinking and using the bathroom normally.  

This sounds to me like she did communicate with the vet during the call.



I modified.  But, at the same time there is nothing in the original that this interaction was relayed to the client.
 
Honsetly, she sounds like a concerned cat owner and I can't see that what she did was rude.
 
It kind of gets to me that people will come here and vent about work situations interacting with the public as if they are social interactions which they are not.  Presumably there is some sort of office policy in place to determine how to handle concerned pet owners.
 
"I'm afraid that won't be possible" is a phrase used to shut someone down.  It's a little disturbing to me that one would want to do that to a concerned client.  What would seem more productive would be to tell the client what is possible rather than trying to shut them down.  In these situations, I just don't think its that polite.  I certainly don't see it as a kind of victory over a rude person.
 
For the social interaction, saying that phrase creates a kind of policy in a way that helps strengthen an individuals ability to stand their ground.  In business, you can say it, but there most likely policies in place that one can point to repeatedly without having to try and shut a person down like this.
 


I disagree with you, strongly.  The owner described what the cat was doing, and the OP explained that this was normal post-op behaviour and everything was fine.  It's her job to know this, and to stop the vet having to handle 500 calls a day when they could instead be in surgery or doing something more useful.  It's the OP's job to know what is going on with pets and how they should be - there was no reason for the owner to keep going on and on and on.  I find that attitude that only a single vet can ever be consulted quite irritating - answering questions like this is what the OP is paid for.

Presumably when I go to a vet, I pay for the expertise of the vet and not his/her secretary or receptionist.  If I called my vet with concerns and was stonewalled from having my concerns relayed to the vet for consideration, I would find another vet.  Unless the person answering the phone is qualified to make decisions about the medical care of the pet, then it is not what they are paid for.
 
The OP cleared up that she was relaying concerns to the vet.
 
Dealing with the public is not easy.  It take a lot of skill and experience.  It's not just about answering phones.   But, it's also not a social interaction and being that it is something one is paid to do, one must be more careful in how the interactions are handled because a pet's life and a vet's reputation are at the heart of it.

RingTailedLemur

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Re: Used it at work today--A Vet's Office Story
« Reply #14 on: August 30, 2009, 04:04:03 PM »
 
 What she wanted was for me to say, "Here's Dr. Tina's personal number.  Go ahead and call her whenever you like later today/tomorrow and tell her of your concerns.  She may even meet you here at the clinic if you want your cat to be seen."  However, I was not about to do this.  I had described everything SSC told me to Dr. Tina, and she assured me that the cat was fine as long as he was eating/drinking and using the bathroom normally.  

This sounds to me like she did communicate with the vet during the call.



I modified.  But, at the same time there is nothing in the original that this interaction was relayed to the client.
 
Honsetly, she sounds like a concerned cat owner and I can't see that what she did was rude.
 
It kind of gets to me that people will come here and vent about work situations interacting with the public as if they are social interactions which they are not.  Presumably there is some sort of office policy in place to determine how to handle concerned pet owners.
 
"I'm afraid that won't be possible" is a phrase used to shut someone down.  It's a little disturbing to me that one would want to do that to a concerned client.  What would seem more productive would be to tell the client what is possible rather than trying to shut them down.  In these situations, I just don't think its that polite.  I certainly don't see it as a kind of victory over a rude person.
 
For the social interaction, saying that phrase creates a kind of policy in a way that helps strengthen an individuals ability to stand their ground.  In business, you can say it, but there most likely policies in place that one can point to repeatedly without having to try and shut a person down like this.
 


I disagree with you, strongly.  The owner described what the cat was doing, and the OP explained that this was normal post-op behaviour and everything was fine.  It's her job to know this, and to stop the vet having to handle 500 calls a day when they could instead be in surgery or doing something more useful.  It's the OP's job to know what is going on with pets and how they should be - there was no reason for the owner to keep going on and on and on.  I find that attitude that only a single vet can ever be consulted quite irritating - answering questions like this is what the OP is paid for.

Presumably when I go to a vet, I pay for the expertise of the vet and not his/her secretary or receptionist.  If I called my vet with concerns and was stonewalled from having my concerns relayed to the vet for consideration, I would find another vet.  Unless the person answering the phone is qualified to make decisions about the medical care of the pet, then it is not what they are paid for.

 
The OP cleared up that she was relaying concerns to the vet.
 
Dealing with the public is not easy.  It take a lot of skill and experience.  It's not just about answering phones.   But, it's also not a social interaction and being that it is something one is paid to do, one must be more careful in how the interactions are handled because a pet's life and a vet's reputation are at the heart of it.

And how do you know the OP is not a vet tech?  You are very dismissive of the workers at vets' offices - in my experience, they all have some animal care training.  Enough to deal with issues like this (all for free, of course).

I must say, I find your tone very rude.
« Last Edit: August 30, 2009, 04:18:46 PM by FireWalkWithMe »