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  • May 28, 2017, 05:51:24 AM

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Author Topic: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74  (Read 3202112 times)

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Chipmunky

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11160 on: May 18, 2017, 07:43:28 AM »
New data guy is officially christened Mr. Rogers. He's so polite on the phone when we have to talk analyses :).

Found out in addition to the assistant who needs a nickname, there is a fourth data person being added to our overall team. Once I've got a feel on them, I'll post more nicknames.

Can't believe I forgot about her, but Mooch is still around. She's not been doing much mooching of late, however she's got a bee in her britches over one of my newly assigned big projects.

Pitayara is the assigned assistant on it (and I must say, she's been doing an excellent job with finding out certain details for me for the project and responding in a timely fashion- the one time she didn't, I'd sent the email requesting information late one afternoon, and had an email from her the next morning apologizing that she'd missed seeing it due to xyz assigned tasks (completely understandable)....she then had the requested info to me within 3 hours).

There's certain components to this project that are very, very sensitive information, but Mooch doesn't know/understand that. I'm clear with Boss Lady and Awesome Colleague on the sensitive information, but if Mooch bugs me again this week about it, I'll have to send her a polite email stating the matter is under control and to please back off from something that is not in her purview.

Coralreef

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11161 on: May 18, 2017, 07:53:30 AM »
NICESTUFF CO vs HEADDESK CO : The beast is back and they have a new salesrep!

The new sales rep called, all nice and polite, wanting to meet me and resume doing business with us. I knew the man from his previous employer (chemicals is a small world in a way). I told him the whole saga and to not waste his time trying to get back in, because it would never, ever happen.

He told me he was hired to fix problems for them. Good luck with that, because the main problem is the company president and his staff (from what I know, they are family, so... no fixing that).

[/right

Redneck Gravy

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11162 on: May 18, 2017, 09:17:15 AM »
My friend relayed this story to me last night...

She works for a chain of grocery stores and every summer they carry a limited amount of barbeque grills assembled for an easy quick sale (overpriced but convenient to their customers).  One summer she and I put them together on a rainy day while visiting one of her stores on our way to a girls weekend (so not rocket science). 

On Monday while visiting one of her stores she overheard the dry goods dept manager ask her new assistant to assemble the first grill and get it out on the floor for sale, then assemble the rest at his convenience but sometime this week.  His reply, "I'm not doing that."

Her immediate and calm reply was (and I'm quoting my friend), "Assistant you see those double doors that lead into the street?  You may either do the job I just assigned you or you may walk right out those doors and corporate will mail your check.  This was part of the job description when you took this job, if you are unwilling to perform this job I will hire someone that will."   Assistant then sat down with box and began to assemble first unit.

My friend followed dept manager to her office to discuss whatever their business was.  Friend said manager was shaking with anger, said she could not believe that an employee just told her they were not going to do a job assigned to them.  This led to a discussion about darwinism, work ethic, etc.   Friend said she would have never been able to keep her composure, she would have been more likely to say something with colorful metaphors about removing his donkey from her sight line.  She and I both thought manager handled it extremely well. 

We were talking last night about the last time we told a supervisor/boss/owner that we weren't going to perform a task we were told to perform, oh, never.       

Black Delphinium

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11163 on: May 18, 2017, 10:37:43 AM »
I've told supervisors that I'm unwilling to do a task before, but it was matters of I hadn't been trained in it, or I had been injured recently and was unwilling to do something that might reinjure me. Not just because I didn't feel like it.
When angels go bad, they go worse than anyone. Remember, Lucifer was an angel. ~The Marquis De Carabas

Redneck Gravy

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11164 on: May 18, 2017, 01:08:36 PM »
I've told supervisors that I'm unwilling to do a task before, but it was matters of I hadn't been trained in it, or I had been injured recently and was unwilling to do something that might reinjure me. Not just because I didn't feel like it.

Yes my thinking was I would probably pick up my jaw and ask "why is that?"    Because yes there are justifiable reasons to not do a task, sorry if I implied there was never a reason to say that. 

iridaceae

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11165 on: May 19, 2017, 01:37:24 AM »
I've told supervisors that I'm unwilling to do a task before, but it was matters of I hadn't been trained in it, or I had been injured recently and was unwilling to do something that might reinjure me. Not just because I didn't feel like it.

Same here. I once told a manager I'd be happy to do a task, but I didn't know how. He got angry because he thought I was blowing him off. He apologized when he realized I really, truly didn't know how.
Nothing to see here.

Kiwipinball

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11166 on: May 19, 2017, 12:24:04 PM »
I've told supervisors that I'm unwilling to do a task before, but it was matters of I hadn't been trained in it, or I had been injured recently and was unwilling to do something that might reinjure me. Not just because I didn't feel like it.

Same here. I once told a manager I'd be happy to do a task, but I didn't know how. He got angry because he thought I was blowing him off. He apologized when he realized I really, truly didn't know how.

I think the key thing if you're refusing to do a task for a good reason is to follow up the refusal with the explanation. "I'm sorry, I haven't been trained to do that and can't operate that machine until I am." "Sure, but I don't know how, can you show me?" "Unfortunately, due to my shoulder injury, I'm not able to do that. I could do X instead." Or whatever. If the reason for not wanting to do something is that it's unethical or illegal, professional darwinism may not be a pressing issue. :) But flat out refusing is disrespectful and likely to cause problems.

guihong

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11167 on: May 19, 2017, 01:24:01 PM »
New data guy is officially christened Mr. Rogers. He's so polite on the phone when we have to talk analyses :).


That's a "Silly Little Thing That Made Me Happy"-I got to name Chipmunky's coworker  ;D.



Dr. F.

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11168 on: May 19, 2017, 05:31:15 PM »
Bear with me, this one is long and complex.

I was in a car with two coworkers, Doris and Nancy. The three of us had the same boss and were in the same department. Doris and I got into a conversation about an incident we had witnessed involving a mistake made by an intern. The intern worked in a moderately public area, and Doris and I were in there for another reason when we witnessed the intern make a horrific mistake - as in, a misfiling that could premanently gum up several records (that's not it exactly, but it's pretty close). Doris brought the intern's attention to the mistake, the intern's response was, "Who cares?" We had no qualms discussing our possible response - mention it to our mutual boss? - in front of Nancy because we were all in the same Department. We also delicately asked Nancy if she had observed any issues with the intern. Doris' housemate, Susan, was a coworker of the intern's. Doris mentioned, in passing, that Susan seemed fed up with the intern, but hadn't passed on any details.

Next thing we know, our boss' boss called Susan into his office and threatened to fire her for passing on information to Doris and I. It seems Nancy was so concerned about our conversation, she mentioned it to our boss, who then mentioned it to *her* boss, who decided to blame the entire incident on *Susan*, who was not involved in the conversation at all and had not, in fact, passed on any information. The grand-boss knew full well the intern worked in a semi-public area (he was often there himself - it doubled as a break room), but decided that the only way Doris and I could have known about the incident was if Susan told us. Susan was going on leave for a month to look after her parents on the opposite coast, the grand-boss said, "Go ahead and leave. I haven't decided if I'm going to fire you or not. I'll let you know when you get back."

In retrospect, Doris and I should not have discussed the incident in front of  Nancy. However, I would have *never* expected her to go behind our backs to our boss, since our conversation was whether or not this merited reporting. Perhaps she was just so concerned about the intern's mistake that she was determined to report it, no matter what we decided. The grand-boss, however, overreacted in a completely bizarre way. He ignored the intern's mistake completely and blamed Susan for speaking out of turn, which was completely false. Remember, Doris and I *witnessed* the mistake. Susan was in another room. Oh, and he told Susan that if she mentioned any of this to anyone, he'd fire her on the spot.

The PD in all of this? I left. Susan quit. The intern was fired, eventually, after making many more mistakes that finally came to light. They may well still be cleaning up that mess, 5 years later. The grand-boss was eventually fired for a complete lack of management ability*. I never trusted Nancy with any information after that.

*This is the same guy who downgraded me on an annual review for being "too responsible and caring too much about deadlines."

siamesecat2965

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11169 on: May 22, 2017, 09:29:03 AM »
I've told supervisors that I'm unwilling to do a task before, but it was matters of I hadn't been trained in it, or I had been injured recently and was unwilling to do something that might reinjure me. Not just because I didn't feel like it.

Same here. I once told a manager I'd be happy to do a task, but I didn't know how. He got angry because he thought I was blowing him off. He apologized when he realized I really, truly didn't know how.

I think the key thing if you're refusing to do a task for a good reason is to follow up the refusal with the explanation. "I'm sorry, I haven't been trained to do that and can't operate that machine until I am." "Sure, but I don't know how, can you show me?" "Unfortunately, due to my shoulder injury, I'm not able to do that. I could do X instead." Or whatever. If the reason for not wanting to do something is that it's unethical or illegal, professional darwinism may not be a pressing issue. :) But flat out refusing is disrespectful and likely to cause problems.

This. At my former PT retail job one closing task was vacuuming. I had a bad shoulder (still do!) and politely let them know that vacuuming wasn't that easy for me to do. Yes, i could vacuum with my left hand but its awkward. What I did also say, was that I was more than willing to do any of the other closing tasks, if someone else was willing to vacuum.

iridaceae

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11170 on: May 22, 2017, 09:37:21 AM »
I've told supervisors that I'm unwilling to do a task before, but it was matters of I hadn't been trained in it, or I had been injured recently and was unwilling to do something that might reinjure me. Not just because I didn't feel like it.

Same here. I once told a manager I'd be happy to do a task, but I didn't know how. He got angry because he thought I was blowing him off. He apologized when he realized I really, truly didn't know how.

I think the key thing if you're refusing to do a task for a good reason is to follow up the refusal with the explanation. "I'm sorry, I haven't been trained to do that and can't operate that machine until I am." "Sure, but I don't know how, can you show me?" "Unfortunately, due to my shoulder injury, I'm not able to do that. I could do X instead." Or whatever. If the reason for not wanting to do something is that it's unethical or illegal, professional darwinism may not be a pressing issue. :) But flat out refusing is disrespectful and likely to cause problems.

This. At my former PT retail job one closing task was vacuuming. I had a bad shoulder (still do!) and politely let them know that vacuuming wasn't that easy for me to do. Yes, i could vacuum with my left hand but its awkward. What I did also say, was that I was more than willing to do any of the other closing tasks, if someone else was willing to vacuum.

I'm confused; are you thinking I said "nope, not doing it" without explaining?
Nothing to see here.

Shalamar

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11171 on: May 23, 2017, 11:16:29 AM »
I remember when I was being trained to take orders from store managers over the phone and enter their orders online.  I'd only received a small amount of training, so when my boss said "You answer the next call", I said "Oh, boy, I really don't feel ready.  Can someone else handle it?"  She was furious and told me icily "When I tell you to do something, you do it."  I did not like her ...

Getting back to the "must have reliable transportation" topic for a sec - my husband and I used to deliver newspapers.  Someone would drop off the papers on our doorstep, we'd quickly count them to make sure we had enough, then we'd start doing our deliveries.  I lost count of the number of times the drop-off guy was late and/or gave us too few papers.  Every time I called my supervisor, he'd make some excuse for the guy - usually "His car broke down."  Sure, except that Rule #1 for that guy's job was "Must have reliable transportation."  How he kept his job, I'll never know.

Chipmunky

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11172 on: May 24, 2017, 08:19:18 AM »
It's not a case of PD yet.....but oh, it eventually could be.

Remember how I mentioned Bonehead got his nickname for being a complete Bonehead? (Brief Recap: Bonehead had issues with authority, refused to do assigned work, and got into two, count em, two screaming matches with Boss Lady before being "out sick" for nearly a month and resigning by email. Good Times)

Bonehead has found employment in Main City with a private firm. The way his biography is written implies that he spent many more years and has way more experience in the area of legal issues we handle than he actually did via his employment at other government agencies (he might have had a very very minor touch on some of those issues due to referrals, but it'd be akin to the guy stocking wonder bread in your grocery store claiming he's a baker because he touches the bread).

Awesome Colleague is aware of this, as is Awesome Paralegal. I doubt Boss Lady will go out of her way to call him and his lack of actual expertise out in front of his new firm, but if he were to get a case doing the private sector side of the stuff we handle, that ends up involving our section of our agency.....yeah, that won't be pretty, and he won't look good when his superiors figure out that he really doesn't know what he's doing.

Kiwipinball

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11173 on: May 24, 2017, 08:43:35 AM »
I've told supervisors that I'm unwilling to do a task before, but it was matters of I hadn't been trained in it, or I had been injured recently and was unwilling to do something that might reinjure me. Not just because I didn't feel like it.

Same here. I once told a manager I'd be happy to do a task, but I didn't know how. He got angry because he thought I was blowing him off. He apologized when he realized I really, truly didn't know how.

I think the key thing if you're refusing to do a task for a good reason is to follow up the refusal with the explanation. "I'm sorry, I haven't been trained to do that and can't operate that machine until I am." "Sure, but I don't know how, can you show me?" "Unfortunately, due to my shoulder injury, I'm not able to do that. I could do X instead." Or whatever. If the reason for not wanting to do something is that it's unethical or illegal, professional darwinism may not be a pressing issue. :) But flat out refusing is disrespectful and likely to cause problems.

This. At my former PT retail job one closing task was vacuuming. I had a bad shoulder (still do!) and politely let them know that vacuuming wasn't that easy for me to do. Yes, i could vacuum with my left hand but its awkward. What I did also say, was that I was more than willing to do any of the other closing tasks, if someone else was willing to vacuum.

I'm confused; are you thinking I said "nope, not doing it" without explaining?

No, not at all. The original PD story was about someone who did. I was making the point that the important part, if there's a good reason for not doing something, is to explain the reason and not just refuse. Sorry if I accidentally implied you just refused.