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Baby Names - You're kidding Right???

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iridaceae:
It reminds me of my great-grandfather and one of his brothers...imaginatively named William Henry and Henry William. We thought the census goofed and named great grandfather twice until I ran across the other one's (highly unusual last name so I know it isn't a stranger I found) marriage announcement. He married someone who was definitely not my great grandmother and lived at the other end of the state- my great grandfather lived in his same house all his life.

cwm:
I saw a few more in the course of work lately. Ransom and Lacresha.

Ransom is just not a name. (Well, apparently it is, so whatever.) It's weird. Why would you want to name your child that?

Lucretia/Lucrezia is a perfectly beautiful name, but when I see Lacresha I think lah-cresh-uh. It doesn't even seem like it would sound the same to me.

Carotte:
And to think that the little Ahhneastiy Lyyn that started this thread is around 5 y/old now, at least she probably has so many little friends with unique names that she doesn't feel so alone  ::)

mime:

--- Quote from: Kimblee on October 08, 2013, 05:06:37 PM ---
--- Quote from: iridaceae on September 19, 2013, 08:32:13 PM ---
--- Quote from: Curious Cat on September 19, 2013, 07:51:31 PM ---
--- Quote from: RegionMom on August 24, 2013, 03:03:10 PM ---Oluwatomiwa & Oluwatomisin.
--- End quote ---

I find this incredibly offensive. Just because you aren't able to pronounce these names doesn't qualify them as jibberish.



--- End quote ---
Correct; they are Yoruban names. So unless you consider the Yoruba language to be gibberish......

--- End quote ---

Since you seem to know the language these names come from(and I mean no offense asking this, I just can't seem to work it out myself) could you give the phonetic pronouciation of those names?

It's driving me nuts.

Our school had a policy for 'difficult' ethnic names. They asked the child/teen to say their name slowly to the office secretary, who wrote it out phonetically and sent it with the kid's papers to their teachers. Occasionally the fore mentioned phonetics had to be shared with the fellow students. And once a name so stumped the school (it had nine syllables and some had no vowels.) that the student herself took pity on the school and decided to go by "Min".

--- End quote ---

The school where I volunteered did this, too. I remember the name "Qij", was pronounced "EE-ah", which I think sounds kind of sweet. I have no idea if the name was common or not in that student's native culture, but I would have tried many many pronounciations for Qij before ever considering EE-ah!

Nikko-chan:

--- Quote from: Carotte on October 09, 2013, 10:01:01 AM ---And to think that the little Ahhneastiy Lyyn that started this thread is around 5 y/old now, at least she probably has so many little friends with unique names that she doesn't feel so alone  ::)

--- End quote ---

Hopefully Maggie can come in and give us an update on that, whether they actually named the baby that or not

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