Author Topic: "May" We Tell You You ROCK?! (Remember! Both donors AND NON-donors are stars!)  (Read 147393 times)

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Nurvingiel

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Re: Donating blood
« Reply #30 on: September 15, 2009, 04:06:04 PM »
I have small veins, any smaller and I wouldn't be able to donate at all, so there is no room for error. I've learned a couple useful tips from a really good phlebotomist.

The veins in your dominant arm are larger than in your other arm. There are two veins in your arm. One is larger, but drawing blood from it hurts more. The smaller one is what they usually aim for, because it hurts less.

The last time I gave blood, I told the phlebotomist to draw from the large vein in my left arm (I'm left-handed). It went perfectly, and actually didn't hurt one bit. (I'm now convinced this is the only vein I have that it's easy to draw blood from.)

It helped that I was quite relaxed. The more you relax, the less pain. (I find it helps to look away from the phlebotomist and think about something else.)
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M-theory

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Re: Donating blood
« Reply #31 on: September 15, 2009, 04:07:34 PM »
(I find it helps to look away from the phlebotomist and think about something else.)

I'm the opposite. I have to watch it go in, or else it startles me...because my attention span is really THAT short. Is that sad or what?

Harriet Jones

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Re: Donating blood
« Reply #32 on: September 15, 2009, 04:12:08 PM »
I just scheduled an appointment at a local blood drive.  I'm O-, so I need to start donating more...

Moralia

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Re: Donating blood
« Reply #33 on: September 15, 2009, 04:14:22 PM »
Yay Twinkie!

Julep

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Re: Donating blood
« Reply #34 on: September 15, 2009, 04:20:05 PM »
Also, when it comes to blood types, I've always been really interested in how they're distributed among the population.  I think 70% of Americans have either O+ or A+ (it's about 35% for each of those).  B+ and AB+ are a lot less common, but any of the Rh- types are really uncommon (probably because Rh- is recessive to Rh+).  It's just amazing to me that O+ is as common as it is, since O is recessive to both A and B types.

That reminded me of something from my first blood donation. I learned that I was Rh [something]. I've never been able to remember it since, but they told me it only really would be an issue if I got pregnant, and even then, it was only likely to be a problem with my second child. I was in high school at the time and not planning any such thing, so I promptly formatted that portion of my memory.

Which do you think that would mean - positive or negative? I just tried to google it and got wayyy more scientific stuff than I can understand.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Donating blood
« Reply #35 on: September 15, 2009, 04:23:25 PM »
From what I understand, you are likely Rh -ve.

There is a shot that they can give you during your pregnancy that helps with any issues.  I think it is an antibody issue if the baby is Rh +ve.

But if your baby's father is also Rh -ve, then you are in the clear because the baby can only be Rh -ve, in that case.
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Harriet Jones

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Re: Donating blood
« Reply #36 on: September 15, 2009, 04:26:06 PM »
Probably Rh-  (google blue baby syndrome)

If your children's father is Rh+, then it can be an issue with pregnancies, but there's a medication called RhoGam (don't know if it has other names) that helps prevent the problem.  DH is Rh+ and I am Rh- and I did not have any problems of this sort.

drebay

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Re: Donating blood
« Reply #37 on: September 15, 2009, 04:27:15 PM »
I really should donate more than I have.  However, the new nurses like to practice on me, as I guess I have awesome veins (they stare at you even without the rubber band)

LadyClaire

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Re: Donating blood
« Reply #38 on: September 15, 2009, 04:29:20 PM »
Also, when it comes to blood types, I've always been really interested in how they're distributed among the population.  I think 70% of Americans have either O+ or A+ (it's about 35% for each of those).  B+ and AB+ are a lot less common, but any of the Rh- types are really uncommon (probably because Rh- is recessive to Rh+).  It's just amazing to me that O+ is as common as it is, since O is recessive to both A and B types.

That reminded me of something from my first blood donation. I learned that I was Rh [something]. I've never been able to remember it since, but they told me it only really would be an issue if I got pregnant, and even then, it was only likely to be a problem with my second child. I was in high school at the time and not planning any such thing, so I promptly formatted that portion of my memory.

Which do you think that would mean - positive or negative? I just tried to google it and got wayyy more scientific stuff than I can understand.

negative. I'm Rh-, and my doctor told me that I'd need to have the shot if I get pregnant because DF is Rh+.

It can be a problem with the second pregnancy because if your first child is Rh+, your body can create antibodies that will attack another Rh+ fetus. With your first pregnancy, your body hasn't been exposed to Rh+ blood yet and so hasn't created the antibodies. But that's what the shot is for..to stop the antibodies from harming the baby.

Julep

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Re: Donating blood
« Reply #39 on: September 15, 2009, 04:33:23 PM »
negative. I'm Rh-, and my doctor told me that I'd need to have the shot if I get pregnant because DF is Rh+.

It can be a problem with the second pregnancy because if your first child is Rh+, your body can create antibodies that will attack another Rh+ fetus. With your first pregnancy, your body hasn't been exposed to Rh+ blood yet and so hasn't created the antibodies. But that's what the shot is for..to stop the antibodies from harming the baby.

Thanks to you all! Wow! This is enlightening, and I'm glad I know it now! I'll have to see if fiance knows his Rh status.


Dindrane

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Re: Donating blood
« Reply #40 on: September 15, 2009, 04:43:20 PM »
Everyone else is right about the Rh thing, as far as I know.  My understanding is that they will just give you the RhoGam shot as a preventative measure a lot of the time, because I don't think it does any harm if you end up not needing it (and they can't exactly type the baby's blood in utero).  If you are Rh- and your baby's father is Rh+, I think there's like a 75% chance that the baby would also be Rh+.


BuffaloFang

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Re: Donating blood
« Reply #41 on: September 15, 2009, 04:49:59 PM »
I admit that I really hate donating blood, but I keep doing it.  I've got O-, and they guilt trip me with the need for that, and also my blood is good for babies or something.  In other words I feel like I'm killing babies if I don't do it.
LOL too funny.

Yay to Dotty for donating!  I used to donate regularly (I was just shy of 2 gallons) when I became anemic and now can't donate much anymore...maybe once a year if I'm lucky.  Although this year I haven't even donated and I'm still anemic.   >:(  I tried donating platelets but one of my counts (not sure what it was) was too low, so they wouldn't take that either.

They also hate my veins (tendons are blocking all most all of them), so I think I'm just doomed to being useless...sigh.  So I'm glad there are so many other helpful people out there to make up for my lack of helpfulness.

Nurvingiel

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Re: Donating blood
« Reply #42 on: September 15, 2009, 04:59:31 PM »
I admit that I really hate donating blood, but I keep doing it.  I've got O-, and they guilt trip me with the need for that, and also my blood is good for babies or something.  In other words I feel like I'm killing babies if I don't do it.
LOL too funny.

Yay to Dotty for donating!  I used to donate regularly (I was just shy of 2 gallons) when I became anemic and now can't donate much anymore...maybe once a year if I'm lucky.  Although this year I haven't even donated and I'm still anemic.   >:(  I tried donating platelets but one of my counts (not sure what it was) was too low, so they wouldn't take that either.

They also hate my veins (tendons are blocking all most all of them), so I think I'm just doomed to being useless...sigh.  So I'm glad there are so many other helpful people out there to make up for my lack of helpfulness.
Linteater, you're not useless. You and millions of people, literally millions, are barred from donating blood for one reason or another. My Mom can't donate because she doesn't weigh enough.

GirlyGirl, I really think it's not cool that you get a guilt trip about not donating. Yes, your blood is incredibly valuable, but it's your blood. You can do whatever you want with it! Donate, spill it playing rugby, not donate - it is yours alone. Guilt tripping really ticks me off, especially when it comes to your own blood.

The Canadian Red Cross had some really guilt-tripping ads (I don't know if they still run) that drove me absolutely 'round the twist; mostly it was the combination of the guilt-trip plus the fact that this decent-sized city doesn't have a permanent clinic. My Dad used to donate blood every 56 days when we did have a clinic - now that we don't he never donates. He didn't even know about the mobile clinic, but it doesn't matter anymore because he's out of the habit of donating.

I do believe in blood donation and I think it's wonderful. I'm really going to try to hit the next clinic. But guilt-tripping people about it is not cool. It's not the Red Cross's fault that they don't have enough funding, but they also communicate poorly so they could be more productive and proactive about soliciting donations instead of guilt tripping. (They did start a Facebook group though, so I'm happy that they finally embraced social networking.)
« Last Edit: September 15, 2009, 05:01:11 PM by Nurvingiel »
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faithlessone

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Re: Donating blood
« Reply #43 on: September 15, 2009, 05:07:01 PM »
Hehe - I've actually got an appointment to go donate tomorrow!

I've only given blood a couple of times before (I have a nasty habit of getting sick every time I decide to do it), but I do try. My Dad had complications after surgery two years ago, and they used several bags of blood saving his life. We're both A-, so I like to think that I'm topping up the supply for the next time either of us need it.

Midnight Kitty

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Re: Donating blood
« Reply #44 on: September 15, 2009, 05:07:38 PM »
After years of not being able to donate blood because I weighed 90 pounds, I was excited when I gained enough weight to donate.  Then we discovered that my veins are not good for needle sticks.  For some reason, the vein wall is sucked up against the needle, blocking off blood flow.  One time when I donated at the Blood Bank, the phlebotomist scolded me for taking so long and crying.  I kept saying, "this really, really hurts."  She told me if I didn't fill the pint, they were going to throw it away.  I couldn't take the pain.  After she disconnected me, she practically pushed me out of the building without letting me grab any juice or cookies.  I guess I didn't deserve them since she threw my blood away.  It was a total waste, plus I had a big bruise and my arm was sore for days.

The next time I tried to donate blood, it was an office blood drive.  The phlebotomist had to kneel by my side and hold the needle the whole time to keep it from sucking up against the vein wall.  It took us over half an hour to fill one bag.  The blood bank asked me not to come back.  They said they can't have one phlebotomist spend that long on one donor.

Now I hate blood drives.  My coworkers look at my naked arm like I'm some kind of a slacker.  (Did I mention that I work for the Department of Health?)  Since I take NSAIDS, they can't use all my blood anyway.  Their suggestion that I not take my medication for a couple days so I can donate blood was heartless: Do they think I take these drugs for fun?  I need them to function.

I don't think much of the Blood Bank phlebotomists either - bad attitudes.  If they wonder why their donation rate is so low, maybe they should look in the mirror.
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