Author Topic: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart  (Read 608103 times)

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Julia Mercer

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #3240 on: October 19, 2012, 08:17:36 PM »
I had a NASTY boil on my back, around my shoulder blade, and was prescribed some cream to put on it to "burn" it off, and the result was quite gross and stinky! And quite hard to treat with the location. Had one under my boob that was easier to treat, but just quite as nasty!

twiggy

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #3241 on: October 23, 2012, 11:54:51 AM »
I've been having problems with our family dog digging diapers out of the trash and devouring them in the backyard. So, in playing on Google, I came across this: http://www.k9station.com/articles/poopeaters.htm Scroll all the way to the bottom, the paragraph that begins "An anecdote...do not read if you have a weak stomach..." It's about a poop eating dog, which is bad enough, but then it gets worse.
In the United States today, there is a pervasive tendency to treat children as adults, and adults as children.  The options of children are thus steadily expanded, while those of adults are progressively constricted.  The result is unruly children and childish adults.  ~Thomas Szasz

Mental Magpie

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #3242 on: October 23, 2012, 07:48:14 PM »
I've been having problems with our family dog digging diapers out of the trash and devouring them in the backyard. So, in playing on Google, I came across this: http://www.k9station.com/articles/poopeaters.htm Scroll all the way to the bottom, the paragraph that begins "An anecdote...do not read if you have a weak stomach..." It's about a poop eating dog, which is bad enough, but then it gets worse.

Oh my...hahaha.  I have a strong stomach, but that may have made me lose it outside just like the author.
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

mmswm

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #3243 on: October 23, 2012, 08:35:59 PM »
I have three boys, currently ages 13, 11 and 10.  "Gross" is just an everyday part of my life.  I have tons of stories, but one of my favorites happened about 2 years ago.

We had a couple of back to back blizzards, and the boys had been trapped inside for a few days.  It was during the winter holidays, so they didn't even have school to burn off some of the excess energy.  They decided to play "FBI Agent" inside.  My little one, who was about 8 at the time, jumped over the back of the couch and then squealed a little bit.  I heard him yell "MOM, look!  I can see my knee!"  I was a bit confused until he clarified: he could see the actual bone.  Somehow or another, a glass pane from a picture frame had found its way between two of the couch cushions and he sliced his knee open. There was blood everywhere.  Blood doesn't bother me too much (if it did, I'd be in a whole lot of trouble with my crew), but seeing the skin over his knee splayed open like that, exposing most of the bone was a little bit more than I was prepared to see at that moment.  The blizzard was still going strong, so it took nearly 45 minutes to drive what should have been 5 minutes to the ER to have the 14 stitches required to close his knee back up.

greencat

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #3244 on: October 23, 2012, 08:46:41 PM »
I've been having problems with our family dog digging diapers out of the trash and devouring them in the backyard. So, in playing on Google, I came across this: http://www.k9station.com/articles/poopeaters.htm Scroll all the way to the bottom, the paragraph that begins "An anecdote...do not read if you have a weak stomach..." It's about a poop eating dog, which is bad enough, but then it gets worse.

Oh my...hahaha.  I have a strong stomach, but that may have made me lose it outside just like the author.

I've had to clean up messes like that on multiple occasions - when the dog cleared out the kitty litter box after it had been amply used.  I generally just go ahead and throw up into the trash can though.  Thankfully, my current cat litter choice seems to deter the dog from consuming the litter box contents...

Moonie

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #3245 on: October 25, 2012, 05:35:09 PM »
I learned the hard way last week just how gross working with the public can be.  I was waiting on customers for a couple of hours checking out their paperwork when a movement on the counter caught my eye. I bent down real close to see what was crawling there. Lo and behold, it was a pubic louse. :'( Yes, that's right.....a crab. I took a pen and stabbed it to pieces, threw the pen away, squirted hand sanitizer all over the counter, scrubbed it down, used an Clorox wipe on it, then sprayed everything in sight with Lysol.  I'm still thinking I feel crawlies on me.  >:(

wonderfullyanonymous

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #3246 on: October 25, 2012, 07:49:23 PM »
Oh, ew Moonie, that is nasty.


Our maintenance worker was called to clean a mess in one of our ladies' restrooms today. Some lovely lady had left a pile of poop on the floor next to the toilet, with a small dribble on the seat. Someone suggested that it could have been an elderly person who didn't quite make it to the toilet. Our maintenance worker poohpoohed her and said if you can get that close, a half step further back would not have made that big of a difference.

My thought, also, later was, I'm not sure an elderly person would have been able to squat in such a manner as to not get any on them self.

Some people are so nasty.


HermioneGranger

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #3247 on: October 26, 2012, 09:51:00 AM »
Oh, ew Moonie, that is nasty.


Our maintenance worker was called to clean a mess in one of our ladies' restrooms today. Some lovely lady had left a pile of poop on the floor next to the toilet, with a small dribble on the seat. Someone suggested that it could have been an elderly person who didn't quite make it to the toilet. Our maintenance worker poohpoohed her and said if you can get that close, a half step further back would not have made that big of a difference.

My thought, also, later was, I'm not sure an elderly person would have been able to squat in such a manner as to not get any on them self.

Some people are so nasty.

Of course they can be.  They're don't have to clean it up. 

snowfire

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #3248 on: October 26, 2012, 07:35:33 PM »
Just a tiny little gross out...I was over at the stable Tuesday and had just fed a horse treat to our big Shire. These treats are compressed pellets of hay and berries & stuff.  Turk was happily munching on the treat and had a nice BIIIIIIG long slobber hanging from his mouth when he turned his head and the slobber goober came right across my face.  Yeeeccccchhhh.

(Horses have a thing for slobber.  This same horse has dribbled it down my cleavage, blown his nose in my face, blown his nose on the back of my legs while I was wearing shorts, wiped his alfalfa drool covered mouth on my white shirt....The list is endless.)
He's darned lucky I love him.   He also passes gas in my face when I'm brushing out or braiding his tail.  Sigh....

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #3249 on: October 26, 2012, 08:36:08 PM »
I have three boys, currently ages 13, 11 and 10.  "Gross" is just an everyday part of my life.  I have tons of stories, but one of my favorites happened about 2 years ago.

We had a couple of back to back blizzards, and the boys had been trapped inside for a few days.  It was during the winter holidays, so they didn't even have school to burn off some of the excess energy.  They decided to play "FBI Agent" inside.  My little one, who was about 8 at the time, jumped over the back of the couch and then squealed a little bit.  I heard him yell "MOM, look!  I can see my knee!"  I was a bit confused until he clarified: he could see the actual bone.  Somehow or another, a glass pane from a picture frame had found its way between two of the couch cushions and he sliced his knee open. There was blood everywhere.  Blood doesn't bother me too much (if it did, I'd be in a whole lot of trouble with my crew), but seeing the skin over his knee splayed open like that, exposing most of the bone was a little bit more than I was prepared to see at that moment.  The blizzard was still going strong, so it took nearly 45 minutes to drive what should have been 5 minutes to the ER to have the 14 stitches required to close his knee back up.

Your story reminded me of a friend's daughter. I'll call her Duckie and her older sister Bunny. Mostly because they're nice and far from the girl's real names. Not that anyone who knows them would be fooled...

Duckie(aprox. 8 y.o.) and Bunny(aprox. 10) were home minding their younger sisters (twins, probably around 5) and brother (3? maybe 2?) while their parents were out and their great-grandfather was asleep. Somehow Bunny hurt her leg (years later its unclear what the haymaker happened.) pretty badly. As in bleeding HARD from the stains found later. Duckie took stock of the situation and decided NOT TO WAKE their great-grandfather and instead folded seveal large gauze squares into a pad and wrapped it tightly around her sister's leg with bandage tape, then they made lunch for the littler ones and settled them in the kitchen while they (attempted to) clean the blood up.

An hour later their great-grandfather woke up and noticed the innocent looking bandage and was told Bunny had a "little scrape" and accepted it. Until he found the missed stains and dirty towels.

The ER staff deemed it a very nice bandage job, but Duckie was still made to swear she would actually tell someone if it ever happened again.

This is the same little girl who a year later pierced her sister's ears. Bunny had her earrings taken out after a fall made her ear swell and the holes closed. She still had the surgical steel studs but her parents kept putting off having them re-pierced after the injury healed. So, after five months of reminding their parents, Duckie did it with a heated and alcohol rinsed sewing needle. This time there are no excuses. All three of the household's adults were awake and present, just apparently not noticing the girl's activities.

That girl is either going to do amazing things some day, or be a supervillan.

Midnight Kitty

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #3250 on: October 27, 2012, 12:48:53 AM »
Just a tiny little gross out...I was over at the stable Tuesday and had just fed a horse treat to our big Shire. These treats are compressed pellets of hay and berries & stuff. 
Oh-h-h, are those Berry Good horse treats?  Those are Misty's favorites.

Turk was happily munching on the treat and had a nice BIIIIIIG long slobber hanging from his mouth when he turned his head and the slobber goober came right across my face.  Yeeeccccchhhh.

(Horses have a thing for slobber.  This same horse has dribbled it down my cleavage, blown his nose in my face, blown his nose on the back of my legs while I was wearing shorts, wiped his alfalfa drool covered mouth on my white shirt....The list is endless.)
Novalee is Turk's Sister in Slobber.  She's over 17 years old and "leaks" a bit at both ends.  Her lower lip hangs loose most of the time and she drools all over us.  She loves to spray me by blowing her nose all over me.  Misty has wiped her nose on the back of my shirt after sneezing, just like a little kid.  We have no white shirts; Only shirts that used to be white and are now retired to "horse duty."

He also passes gas in my face when I'm brushing out or braiding his tail.  Sigh....
Both Misty and Novalee fart in my face when I clean their hooves and brush their tails.  I know they do it on purpose.  I suspect they think it's funny. >:D
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Kimblee

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #3251 on: October 27, 2012, 02:46:28 PM »
Just a tiny little gross out...I was over at the stable Tuesday and had just fed a horse treat to our big Shire. These treats are compressed pellets of hay and berries & stuff. 
Oh-h-h, are those Berry Good horse treats?  Those are Misty's favorites.

Turk was happily munching on the treat and had a nice BIIIIIIG long slobber hanging from his mouth when he turned his head and the slobber goober came right across my face.  Yeeeccccchhhh.

(Horses have a thing for slobber.  This same horse has dribbled it down my cleavage, blown his nose in my face, blown his nose on the back of my legs while I was wearing shorts, wiped his alfalfa drool covered mouth on my white shirt....The list is endless.)
Novalee is Turk's Sister in Slobber.  She's over 17 years old and "leaks" a bit at both ends.  Her lower lip hangs loose most of the time and she drools all over us.  She loves to spray me by blowing her nose all over me.  Misty has wiped her nose on the back of my shirt after sneezing, just like a little kid.  We have no white shirts; Only shirts that used to be white and are now retired to "horse duty."

He also passes gas in my face when I'm brushing out or braiding his tail.  Sigh....
Both Misty and Novalee fart in my face when I clean their hooves and brush their tails.  I know they do it on purpose.  I suspect they think it's funny. >:D

lol

Horses sound like a hoot.

deadbody

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #3252 on: October 28, 2012, 11:22:54 AM »
Just a tiny little gross out...I was over at the stable Tuesday and had just fed a horse treat to our big Shire. These treats are compressed pellets of hay and berries & stuff. 
Oh-h-h, are those Berry Good horse treats?  Those are Misty's favorites.

Turk was happily munching on the treat and had a nice BIIIIIIG long slobber hanging from his mouth when he turned his head and the slobber goober came right across my face.  Yeeeccccchhhh.

(Horses have a thing for slobber.  This same horse has dribbled it down my cleavage, blown his nose in my face, blown his nose on the back of my legs while I was wearing shorts, wiped his alfalfa drool covered mouth on my white shirt....The list is endless.)
Novalee is Turk's Sister in Slobber.  She's over 17 years old and "leaks" a bit at both ends.  Her lower lip hangs loose most of the time and she drools all over us.  She loves to spray me by blowing her nose all over me.  Misty has wiped her nose on the back of my shirt after sneezing, just like a little kid.  We have no white shirts; Only shirts that used to be white and are now retired to "horse duty."

He also passes gas in my face when I'm brushing out or braiding his tail.  Sigh....
Both Misty and Novalee fart in my face when I clean their hooves and brush their tails.  I know they do it on purpose.  I suspect they think it's funny. >:D

lol

Horses sound like a hoot.

Neigh, owls sound like a hoot.  Horses sound a lot like  small child or a 14 year old boy.

snowfire

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #3253 on: October 28, 2012, 02:02:51 PM »
Yep, they are Berry Good treats.  Turk will frisk my pockets for them.  ;D  He usually doesn't have THAT much drool, I think it's time to check his teeth again. He's almost 16 and for a draft, that's a senior citizen.

Horses in general seem to think farts are funny.  And Turk has the sense of humor of a teenage boy in an 1800 pound horse body.  ;D ::)

Midnight Kitty

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #3254 on: October 29, 2012, 05:41:49 PM »
I have trained Misty since she was 17 months old.  She's 7 years old now.  I had to hire professional help along the way when she became too difficult.  She went through a "buck you" phase.  When she was 4 years old, I hired a professional polo player (PPP) to "teach Misty her job" after she bucked off The Girl With The Velcro Butt (never, ever been bucked off before in her life).  After PPP rode Misty a couple times, she decided she didn't like him.  He would chase her around her pen.  She would kick him when he got close.  He showed me his technicolor ribs.  Ouch!

I gave a container with Berry Good Treats, Nicker Makers, and Pasture Cookies to him.  As a Professional Polo Player, he did not believe in using treats.  I shrugged and said it was his choice.  If he's ruining my horse by bribing/rewarding her, it's my horse and I bribe/reward her with treats.

The next time I saw him, he said, "She prefers Berry Good Treats."  I laughed.  I asked, "Any more difficulty catching her?"  He said, "No.  I shake the treat container and she comes galloping to me."

The gross parts of the story included the torn ligaments in her pelvis that The Girl With The Velcro Butt suffered when Misty threw her, the multicolored ribs of the PPP, and the hematoma the size of a half grapefruit above my left knee I acquired when we had a "mounting mishap."  The hematoma leaked, streaking my leg from the knee to the ankle in purple, red, black and blue.  I had to take 2 weeks off work to lay in bed with my knee elevated.  Three years later, the hematoma is still there.  Smaller, but still there.  It's leaking fluid into my knee joint and causing all kinds of problems.  For the first time in almost 20 years, my doctor and I do not agree.  I want him (or a surgeon) to operate, drain the hematoma and fluid in the knee.  Soft tissue injuries are such a pain.  In those 3 years, I detached my left shoulder supraspinatus tendon from the bone, had rotator cuff surgery, and achieved 100% recovery. ::)
"The first rule is to keep an untroubled spirit.  The second is to look things in the face and know them for what they are."

Marcus Aurelius