Author Topic: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart  (Read 744134 times)

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Dazi

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #4800 on: January 14, 2014, 07:36:56 AM »
I leave my bedroom door open, and the dog (a Boxer, if that matters) usually chooses to sleep on my bed with me.  I have a double bed, but it's still a pretty cramped fit at times because she likes to lay cross-ways or diagonally.  Last night, it was wonderful.  At least, at first.  She got on the bed before I did, but she was lying on one side of the bed, leaving more than enough room for me on the other side.  Whose bed is this anyway?

So, when I fell asleep, she was right beside me with her head at the head of the bed.  Somehow during the night, she flipped around so that her butt was where her head once was.  I found that out the hard way.  She let out one of those silent Boxer farts, and it was the fart that woke me up.  The smell clung to my hair.  I had to wash my hair at 4AM because it smelled like a dog fart.

I probably shouldn't laugh, but I've had similar issues with my cat.  She farted in my face and it had friends.

A few weeks ago she had a slightly impacted anal sac and butt juiced right by my face...she also got the floor right next to the bed.  The smell woke me.  It was on my pillow, in my hair, and when I got out of bed I stepped in it.  YUCK!  It was seriously vile and totally barf worthy.  We had to strip the bed at 3 am, Nature Miracle the floor, and I so had to take a shower.  My DH was pissed about the whole thing, but laughed at me gagging, trying not to barf the entire time.
Meditate. Live purely. Quiet the mind. Do your work with mastery. Like the moon, come out from behind the clouds! Shine. ---Gautama Buddah





Midnight Kitty

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #4801 on: January 14, 2014, 12:49:11 PM »
She asked me to help her find a good home for the horse.  There aren't many people who want to take on the challenge of equine canker and the responsibility of feeding a large horse (half-draft breed) who can only walk & trot a little.  I fear she will need to put him down, which is a pity because he's got a generous heart and a kind eye.
Most areas have some kind of equine rescue that might be able to help...
I'm on Oahu & the humane options are limited.  I've put out some feelers, but the initial responses were not encouraging.  Basically, rescue organizations have more elderly/unsound horses than they can afford to feed.  We're looking into organizations that offer equine assisted therapy as well as rescue groups.  I've seen horses listed on Craig's list for months as "free to good home" and they don't have a nasty smelling, bloody canker that has to be treated several times a week.

Please wish us (& Cowboy) luck  :-*
"The first rule is to keep an untroubled spirit.  The second is to look things in the face and know them for what they are."

Marcus Aurelius

Nikko-chan

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #4802 on: January 14, 2014, 01:04:59 PM »
She asked me to help her find a good home for the horse.  There aren't many people who want to take on the challenge of equine canker and the responsibility of feeding a large horse (half-draft breed) who can only walk & trot a little.  I fear she will need to put him down, which is a pity because he's got a generous heart and a kind eye.
Most areas have some kind of equine rescue that might be able to help...
I'm on Oahu & the humane options are limited.  I've put out some feelers, but the initial responses were not encouraging.  Basically, rescue organizations have more elderly/unsound horses than they can afford to feed.  We're looking into organizations that offer equine assisted therapy as well as rescue groups.  I've seen horses listed on Craig's list for months as "free to good home" and they don't have a nasty smelling, bloody canker that has to be treated several times a week.

Please wish us (& Cowboy) luck  :-*

Midnight Kitty I don't know a lot about horses but... is canker treatable? Meaning will this horse eventually be able to walk and trot normally again?

Midnight Kitty

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #4803 on: January 14, 2014, 05:23:01 PM »
She asked me to help her find a good home for the horse.  There aren't many people who want to take on the challenge of equine canker and the responsibility of feeding a large horse (half-draft breed) who can only walk & trot a little.  I fear she will need to put him down, which is a pity because he's got a generous heart and a kind eye.
Most areas have some kind of equine rescue that might be able to help...
I'm on Oahu & the humane options are limited.  I've put out some feelers, but the initial responses were not encouraging.  Basically, rescue organizations have more elderly/unsound horses than they can afford to feed.  We're looking into organizations that offer equine assisted therapy as well as rescue groups.  I've seen horses listed on Craig's list for months as "free to good home" and they don't have a nasty smelling, bloody canker that has to be treated several times a week.

Please wish us (& Cowboy) luck  :-*

Midnight Kitty I don't know a lot about horses but... is canker treatable? Meaning will this horse eventually be able to walk and trot normally again?
I don't know either.  I've been researching on line and it doesn't look good.  One can treat it so it is smaller/less of a problem, but I haven't heard of a "cure."  I read one article which described a very aggressive treatment regime which must be done by a vet several times a week for weeks.  I guess if one owned an expensive show horse or a horse with excellent bloodlines which they wanted to breed it might be worth it.  I'm not saying the effort isn't worthwhile, but that the expense of having a vet come out several times a week for weeks will be greater than the horse's value.
"The first rule is to keep an untroubled spirit.  The second is to look things in the face and know them for what they are."

Marcus Aurelius

OSUJillyBean

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #4804 on: January 14, 2014, 05:34:11 PM »
I think those kinds of issues are more common in draft breeds and draft crosses.  With the manure, sand, mud, and hair around their feet, I'm not surprised.  Poor Cowboy though.  :( 

White Dragon

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #4805 on: January 14, 2014, 08:01:33 PM »
This was my friend's post on FB today - my response is below:

Last night I was just out of the shower, getting dressed, no glasses on yet. Wilson came into the bathroom with a delectable delight and looking quite guilty. I peer into his mouth, tucked snuggly behind his pearly whites is a treat. I think oh no he got into my mom's baking and is eating a chocolate treat with coconut. I am trying diligently to get this treat out of his mouth and manage to get half of it out. I look at it closely in my near blindness...no, not my mom's baking, not coconut, but rather a 'treasure' from the litterbox with little sprinkles of cat litter embedded on it. I am torn...fight for the piece remaining or not...in my mere second of hesitation Wilson makes the decision...gulp...Oh Wilson.
 :o :o :o

My response:

Today I was standing freezing in the open doorway, eyeballing the dog to make sure she was peeing and not just faking it (which she does sometimes). In the meantime, the cat was peeing on the living room carpet. I know it was the cat because I had JUST checked that spot for dog accidents. And, needless to say, the cat TOTALLY blamed the dog!   ::) ::)

Midnight Kitty

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #4806 on: January 14, 2014, 08:14:34 PM »
I should be ashamed that my first thought, after hearing my friend describe what she has to do to that hoof, was "I can't wait to post this one on the Gross Out thread."  I should be ashamed, but I'm not.  >:D

Horses give us plenty of exposure to yucky stuffs.  My poor mare, Misty, comes into heat several times a year.  It is especially uncomfortable in the summer with the high humidity and heat.  She ended up with a case of "diaper rash" that extended from her private parts to her hocks on both back legs.  The "rash" had large blisters so I gave her a soothing bath in cool water and applied a thin film of desenex.  I thought it would be weird to slip my fingers "up the crack" under her privates, but the skin there is very smooth, almost silky.  Misty would hold her tail up and her back legs apart so I could get in there.  I hope it felt good to her.  She enjoys it when I remove the sebacious material from her nipples.

Floosie! ;D
"The first rule is to keep an untroubled spirit.  The second is to look things in the face and know them for what they are."

Marcus Aurelius

OSUJillyBean

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #4807 on: January 15, 2014, 09:52:40 AM »
MK - have you thought about having her partially spayed?  If you're not going to breed her, a vet should be able to remove her ovaries, which will stop her from coming into heat.  The vet school at OSU used to do this quite often but I'm not certain on the cost.

diesel_darlin

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #4808 on: January 15, 2014, 09:57:16 PM »
My friend had a horse named Rosie. Pure bred Arabian. She was full of attitude. Beautiful horse. Well I had been around horses on and off all my life, but never enough to really amount to anything. I had never seen a female horse in heat. Imagine the laughs my friends got the first time I saw Rosie back her rear up and "wink".  ;D ;D


Hollanda

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #4809 on: January 16, 2014, 09:03:59 AM »
I found a secret location in which DS had hidden roughly half a packet of raisins.  I found the location this morning.  On coming downstairs.  In bare feet.  With my toes.  :'(
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Nikko-chan

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #4810 on: January 16, 2014, 09:56:15 AM »
So.... I think CrochetFanatic's post jinxed me! Jasper (my dog) sleeps in my room now as the cat likes to lay in my mom's room and is a big tantrum throwing baby when he doesn't get what he wants. So Jasper sleeps in my room and I keep my door closed. So I wake up at 1AM to Jasper at the door, wanting to leave the room. Then I smelled a god awful stench. I seriously thought she went to the bathroom in my room. I check. Nope. But I decide she has to go out. Open the door... the little stinkbutt goes into mom's room!

It is one am and I am not dealing with this. I close mom's door after making sure the cat is somewhere other than her room, as I do not want WWIII happening. So mom lets the dog back into my room a few hours later. She was very stenchy again.

Thankfully the gas seems to have stopped, or she would have gassed me out of my own room!

Tsaiko

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #4811 on: January 20, 2014, 03:57:15 PM »
Warning: vomit mentioned

I am currently battling a nasty stomach bug.

At 5:30am, I was throwing up last nights dinner. I discovered three disturbing but kind of nice things. First, cooked spaghetti is very soft coming back up which means it doesn't scratch up my throat. Second, despite being mostly tomatoes, it wasn't that acidic, which means that it again didn't tear up my throat that much. Third, and possibly the most disturbing, it tastes remarkably similar coming up as it did going down.

I could not say the same about the raisin bread, soup, or plain bread I also couldn't keep down today.

greencat

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #4812 on: January 20, 2014, 06:03:20 PM »
I've found that milk is usually very soothing when it comes back up.

perpetua

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #4813 on: January 20, 2014, 06:31:37 PM »
Warning: vomit mentioned

I am currently battling a nasty stomach bug.

At 5:30am, I was throwing up last nights dinner. I discovered three disturbing but kind of nice things. First, cooked spaghetti is very soft coming back up which means it doesn't scratch up my throat. Second, despite being mostly tomatoes, it wasn't that acidic, which means that it again didn't tear up my throat that much. Third, and possibly the most disturbing, it tastes remarkably similar coming up as it did going down.

I discovered that exact same thing about Tesco's sausages a couple of weeks ago.

I will never again eat a Tesco sausage.

OSUJillyBean

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Re: Gross out-- Not for the faint of heart
« Reply #4814 on: January 21, 2014, 10:11:55 AM »
Warning: vomit mentioned

I am currently battling a nasty stomach bug.

At 5:30am, I was throwing up last nights dinner. I discovered three disturbing but kind of nice things. First, cooked spaghetti is very soft coming back up which means it doesn't scratch up my throat. Second, despite being mostly tomatoes, it wasn't that acidic, which means that it again didn't tear up my throat that much. Third, and possibly the most disturbing, it tastes remarkably similar coming up as it did going down.

I could not say the same about the raisin bread, soup, or plain bread I also couldn't keep down today.

I've also found that to be true.  It's weird though when hours later and your dinner still looks like your dinner!