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Author Topic: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)  (Read 285468 times)

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VorFemme

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1515 on: February 28, 2015, 09:32:16 PM »
A Montana doubled operator just passed up the opportunity to provide the Kardashians with a $4k private dogsled expedition in exchange for free publicity:

http://m.daytondailynews.com/news/entertainment/montana-adventure-company-owner-calls-kardashian-c/nkJhB/

His remark about karmic justice is wrong on many levels, but otherwise he's spot on.

Seriously?  They wanted him to do it for free? What's  $4K to them...probably less than 1 hour worth of their yearly income?

Oh, yeah, this has been blowing up my news feed since I went to grad school in Montana and still have friends out there. Evidently, in a follow-up story, he says that turning them down has actually gotten him *more* business. He's booking up rather quickly.

Well, he's clearly good at what he does if there are Hollywood types who want to hire him!
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girlysprite

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1516 on: March 01, 2015, 02:56:46 AM »
Presented for your enjoyment.

As someone who has had a dress handmade in a sort of tudor style with the right materials, I can tell you this. Take the price of a good weddingdress...and then double that amount. She is spot on with the comments on how a royal dress costs a royal amount.

CakeEater

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1517 on: March 01, 2015, 03:48:05 AM »
Presented for your enjoyment.

I found this paragraph especially funny:

It would be an equivalent to me saying to a baker: ‘Here are 3 eggs and some icing sugar, you provide the rest and I want you to make me a 3 tier wedding cake, please’. Nobody does that, so why people assume costumiers ( or jewellers,  corsetieres or generally small businesses) are any different?


because in wedding cake decorating circles, the opposite POV is often used: "People don't say to their dressmakers that it's just fabric and cotton, why does it cost so much - but they say to us, 'It's just flour and eggs, why does it cost so much'?"

PastryGoddess

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1518 on: March 01, 2015, 04:00:00 AM »
Presented for your enjoyment.

I found this paragraph especially funny:

It would be an equivalent to me saying to a baker: ‘Here are 3 eggs and some icing sugar, you provide the rest and I want you to make me a 3 tier wedding cake, please’. Nobody does that, so why people assume costumiers ( or jewellers,  corsetieres or generally small businesses) are any different?


because in wedding cake decorating circles, the opposite POV is often used: "People don't say to their dressmakers that it's just fabric and cotton, why does it cost so much - but they say to us, 'It's just flour and eggs, why does it cost so much'?"

This...so much this. 

camlan

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1519 on: March 01, 2015, 10:39:19 AM »
Presented for your enjoyment.

Wow. Prices are considerably higher for fabric in the UK, I guess.

Not necessarily. I can find wool suiting fabric for about $12/yard, but pure cashmere fabric is about $125 a yard. Some cotton fabrics are $50/yard. And for some of the outfits shown in that link, there are many, many yards of fabric involved. I can find "silk" velvet (it is about 25% silk, 75% rayon) for about $30/yard. If you need five yards of fabric, that's $150, not counting any lining or trim fabrics. I can also find 100% polyester velvet at $5/yard.

It all depends on the quality of the fiber used, the weight of the fabric,  the dyes used, how it is woven, etc.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Elfmama

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1520 on: March 01, 2015, 01:34:05 PM »
Presented for your enjoyment.

I found this paragraph especially funny:

It would be an equivalent to me saying to a baker: ‘Here are 3 eggs and some icing sugar, you provide the rest and I want you to make me a 3 tier wedding cake, please’. Nobody does that, so why people assume costumiers ( or jewellers,  corsetieres or generally small businesses) are any different?


because in wedding cake decorating circles, the opposite POV is often used: "People don't say to their dressmakers that it's just fabric and cotton, why does it cost so much - but they say to us, 'It's just flour and eggs, why does it cost so much'?"
But they do, at least to quilters.  "Fabric is what, a dollar a yard?"  DH has the firm opinion that good quality fabric is $2/yd, and that a middle-of-the-line sewing machine is $150.  Maybe 40 years ago when we got married, dear.  Decent quality quilt cotton is $8-$15 a yard.  Even Walmart's basic stuff is $4-$5/yard.  Yes, up until a year or two ago, Walmart  did have $1/yd fabric, but the quality fell off year by year, until it was such poor quality that would fall apart with the first cleaning. 

An internet friend queried me once on a California King quilt, and I broke it down for him exactly what materials would cost plus my labor plus shipping.  I think the total for materials alone was over $300. 
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
It's true. Money can't buy happiness.  You have to turn it
into books first.
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littlelauraj

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1521 on: March 01, 2015, 05:00:43 PM »
In a similar vein, I went to an art show once with Friend A.  Friend B was showing some of her (amazing) oil painted landscapes.  Friend B has her degree in fine arts and has been an art director with a major publisher for years.  Her work is priced accordingly. 

Halfway through the show, Friend A turned to me and said, "Well, it's pretty and all, but that's a lot for some canvas and paint."  I tried to set her straight, but I doubt it did any good.  So disappointing.

MaryR

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1522 on: March 01, 2015, 05:53:25 PM »
BG: I am very fussy about my needlework. I use a laying tool, dampen my thread to keep it from twisting and one missed stitch will cause me to spend hours backstitching so I can fix it. An acquaintance from a pet rescue group is not nearly as fussy as I am and actually teases me about all the "unnecessary" work I do. Still, she does needlework, so she should have known better to ask this of me.

I told her about a needlework class I was going to attend and she signed up as well. Of course, she completed her project much faster than I did. A couple of weeks ago, she asked how I finished (stretched and backed) my project, so I told her that I would bring it in and show it to her when I was done. This week I brought my project to adoptions so I could show it to her and explain what I had done and how I did it.

She took one look at my project and before she even looked at the back, she said "Yours looks so much better than mine. I wanted to give mine to my MIL. Lets trade!"

My flabber was gasted. To have someone who doesn't stitch ask for my work is one thing, to have a fellow stitcher ask me for my work so she could pass it off as hers honestly rendered me speechless for a minute. After I got over my shock, I told her "No, I already have plans for this piece." Her response gasted my flabber even more. "But, you don't mind being fussy, lets trade and you can fix mine and use it instead." Thanks to this forum, I didn't say what I was thinking. Instead I said "That won't work for me, oh look, Fido needs to go for a walk. We'll be back in a few minutes." While I was out with Fido, I put my project in my car so it wouldn't be accidently switched with hers. She pouted and sulked for the rest of adoptions.

Its been several hours and I still can't believe that she really thought I'd hand my project over to her so I could totally redo her project.

Mel the Redcap

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1523 on: March 01, 2015, 06:16:30 PM »
"I can't be bothered to take the time and care necessary to produce really good work, so I want you to spend all that time and care on two projects so I can give a gift that looks good and get the credit for it, while giving you nothing in return!"

Does that sound like an accurate translation? >:(
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VorFemme

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1524 on: March 01, 2015, 06:45:00 PM »
Presented for your enjoyment.

I found this paragraph especially funny:

It would be an equivalent to me saying to a baker: ‘Here are 3 eggs and some icing sugar, you provide the rest and I want you to make me a 3 tier wedding cake, please’. Nobody does that, so why people assume costumiers ( or jewellers,  corsetieres or generally small businesses) are any different?


because in wedding cake decorating circles, the opposite POV is often used: "People don't say to their dressmakers that it's just fabric and cotton, why does it cost so much - but they say to us, 'It's just flour and eggs, why does it cost so much'?"

Actually, I spent three years *auditing* a mailing list for sewing professionals - as I was considering starting a sewing business "soon".  I wanted to find out how to write a proper contract and know what kind of things might come up.

And there were a lot of comments about seamstresses being handed "some" fabric and maybe a zipper then being told that they wanted a garment like this (ripped out from a catalog or magazine).  No thread, no pattern, no buttons, and none of the various bits & pieces (lining fabric, hooks & eyes, interfacing, petersham to support a waistband)....and usually the piece of fabric was too short for the garment in question, too.  Then the customer would scream because the cost for thread, labor to hand draft a pattern, fittings, more fabric, the bits & bobs, and then the time spent doing the cutting & sewing...

After the first three months, I was pretty sure that I was *not* going into business with my first idea, because I already knew that the prices the target audience was looking at as "right for them" wouldn't cover fabric & the small fee to the pattern maker ($1 garment) for the right to use the pattern as a business.  Much less buttons, zippers, thread, interfacing, electricity for the sewing machine & iron, and everything else involved in turning a yard or three of fabric into a blouse, dress, or whatever else they ordered.  In fact, I would have had to find fabric on sale for about $1 yard (not easy twenty years ago and even less likely today) and buy cheap thread in bulk - no buttons, no zippers, and no interfacing or pressing for shaping.

+++++++++++++

I forget where I saw this anecdote - but it is supposed to date to 100 years ago (or so - at any rate, a time when a well dressed woman didn't step out of her house to go somewhere without a hat on her head).

A younger woman whose husband was applying for an important or promotion needed a hat to go to dinner with the boss and his wife (job entailed some evening duties and she was being looked at as she would be the "hostess" for her husband).  She needed to look well dressed, serious, in touch with fashion but not dressed in a way that looked either too fashionable or unfashionable, and so forth & so on.  Her husband had impressed on her that getting the right hat might easily double his current paycheck (or more) and that it was his first step on the ladder to a lot of promotions that might end up with him being quite high up in the "firm" (lawyer, banker, or some other *large* business). 

She went to the hat maker's shop and tried on every hat in the window, every hat in the store, and started crying because none of them were *the hat*.  She was going to cost her husband his chance at this worked for and hoped for promotion....

The hat maker came out, listened to her story, and asked to borrow a small diamond stick pin that she was wearing, picked up a scrap bit of leftover black velvet from the table at the client's elbow, and proceeded to pleat, twist, and pin the bit of velvet into a hat with the diamond stick pin to keep it in shape.  On the client's head it was clearly the *perfect* hat for that event, that woman, and might get her asked the name of the shop where she'd gotten it by the boss's wife.

She asked the price.  It was high.  She gasped and insisted that it was "only a bit of velvet and her own stickpin".  The hat was removed, shaken out to flatten the twists & pleats, folded & rolled into a ball and handed her with the stickpin.

"The velvet is a gift - but the hat is still *high price*" - it wasn't the velvet or the stickpin - it was the creativity of the hat maker and the training that let her turn the bits & bobs around her into a hat that were what the customer was paying for. 

And that holds true for so many crafts and skilled workers (plumbers, electricians, and more jobs than I want to list - not just hat makers, seamstresses, and bakers) - it's the materials, the time, and knowing how to turn the materials into the desired commodity that costs money.  And *you get what you pay for* - which so many people seem to have forgotten....
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

Thipu1

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1525 on: March 01, 2015, 07:34:35 PM »
Ah yes.  Knowing what you're doing is a huge part of the value of a service. 

A few years ago, MIL was going to teach an extension course.  I saw the bibliography she planned to give her students and it was an absolute mess. Handing that out would have been a major embarrassment for her.  I took a copy home and was able to fix it during my lunch hour at work. 

Her response was, 'How did you do that? It looks so professional!'.

Yup,  that's because I  am a Professional. Remember, I went to grad school.

 

zyrs

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1526 on: March 02, 2015, 03:30:48 PM »
 

Her response was, 'How did you do that? It looks so professional!'.
 

I remember once I was asked by someone to fix a letter to a vendor by the wife of the letter writer.

Vendor was not going to do something that was perfectly in vendor's right not to do since the letter writer had not followed the correct procedure.  The letter writer wrote six pages of an incoherent rant full of expletives.  The letter cast aspersions on the vendor's basic humanity, spouse, parents, siblings and progeny along with their patriotism.  As someone who had worked customer service, it was the sort of letter I hated getting.

So I got the basic facts from the letter writer's wife and wrote a letter that any customer service representative that opened the mail would be happy to receive.  Respectful, acknowledging the mistake, asking that they reconsider.  It had all the pertinent information neatly aligned in chronological order.  It made sense.

The vendor contacted the family within the week saying that they would do what they had origianlly decided not to do.  It saved the letter writer about 50 grand.

sandisadie

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1527 on: March 02, 2015, 04:49:35 PM »
I have been creating stained glass pieces for over 20 years and I still love it.  But I rarely do anything with it anymore because everywhere you look are the pieces made in China that you can purchase from a department store, etc for little or nothing compared to what I have to charge for my work.  These Chinese pieces are done by simply laying a pattern piece on the glass and cutting it out.  Then flat soldering the pieces together.  No thought is given to the swirls and variations in color, etc in the glass sheet.  The soldering is very poorly and hurriedly done.  I have been told more than once that something like what I am offering for, say $150, can be gotten for $49.99 at Walmart.  Once, I was moving to another state and gave my longtime hairdresser one of my suncatchers.  She hung it up in her front window next to a plastic, painted to look like stained glass, suncatcher and thought they both looked to be the same quality.

I know that I do good, artistic work because I've had some of it evaluated by experts in the field.  Sometimes it gets discouraging to use your talents to create something of beauty and have it compared to what amounts to a "hack" job.

VorFemme

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Re: But ... But ... It's Not Like It's Work! (Craft Freebies)
« Reply #1528 on: March 02, 2015, 06:22:37 PM »
I have been creating stained glass pieces for over 20 years and I still love it.  But I rarely do anything with it anymore because everywhere you look are the pieces made in China that you can purchase from a department store, etc for little or nothing compared to what I have to charge for my work.  These Chinese pieces are done by simply laying a pattern piece on the glass and cutting it out.  Then flat soldering the pieces together.  No thought is given to the swirls and variations in color, etc in the glass sheet.  The soldering is very poorly and hurriedly done.  I have been told more than once that something like what I am offering for, say $150, can be gotten for $49.99 at Walmart.  Once, I was moving to another state and gave my longtime hairdresser one of my suncatchers.  She hung it up in her front window next to a plastic, painted to look like stained glass, suncatcher and thought they both looked to be the same quality.

I know that I do good, artistic work because I've had some of it evaluated by experts in the field.  Sometimes it gets discouraging to use your talents to create something of beauty and have it compared to what amounts to a "hack" job.

Some people seem to be "tone deaf" when it comes to music - others are the equivalent when it comes to the visual arts.  And far too many are unable to find a difference in quality between any of the classics or modern "good literature" and the various "quickly dashed off for the money (or personal reasons)" and passed off as something to read (cough, cough - examples might include but not be limited to Twilight, Fifty Shade of Gray, the later Children of Earth series after Ayla's upbringing that left her with no self confidence & more than a few neuroses got to be too much of a plot device, and a lot of the vampire & werewolf "supernatural romances" currently the rage in certain circles).   Others notice a difference - but are willing to put up with whatever the art is (music, literature, painting, sculpture, or stained glass - whatever) as long as they "like it".  Even if it's not great, it's still "good enough to enjoy".
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?