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  • February 18, 2018, 04:50:43 AM

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Author Topic: The Mime initiative  (Read 539 times)

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Twik

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figee

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Re: The Mime initiative
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2018, 04:13:18 PM »
I'm not sure I see your point.  Using a form of social shaming is a pretty well-established means of making a point, either through saying 'just stop' or having someone point out your actions by mimicking them. 

GardenGal

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Re: The Mime initiative
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2018, 04:56:33 PM »
I love the mime idea, but I'm not sure that anything the fellow on the train would have said to the talkative woman would have made her stop talking.  Too bad he couldn't move to another car on the train.  I've never tried saying, "Excuse me, you probably don't realize how loudly you're talking, but I can hear every personal detail of your conversation.  Can you please lower your voice?"  Somehow, I don't think this would work, but YMMV.
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Minmom3

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Re: The Mime initiative
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2018, 06:36:32 PM »
My general opinion of people like the above post are that they just don't care about infringing on others space and ears.  The world is their oyster, to use and abuse.  When spoken to - by me directly at times, watched by me when others do it, people like that are embarrassed in the moment, but not enough to learn from it.  I move away when I can, and endure when I can't.
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GreenBird

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Re: The Mime initiative
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2018, 07:10:51 PM »
The woman on her cell phone on the train was inconsiderate, certainly.  But I think that setting her up for public ridicule on twitter qualifies as retaliatory rudeness.  The guy may not have intended for the press to show up, but apparently he's a public figure so it's not unforeseeable that something like that would happen.  I think he looks especially bad because he didn't even try to simply say something to her, but instead he spent the whole train ride trashing her with identifiable photos on twitter.  I don't think anyone comes out of that situation looking good. 

As for the mimes, I think that is also retaliatory rudeness.  It's fun to picture everyone who has ever annoyed you being surrounded by mimes, but just imagine yourself having a bad day and accidentally parking incorrectly, and then suddenly you are the one surrounded by mimes doing their best to publicly humiliate you.  Not so funny then. 

Hmmmmm

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Re: The Mime initiative
« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2018, 08:49:29 AM »
The woman on her cell phone on the train was inconsiderate, certainly.  But I think that setting her up for public ridicule on twitter qualifies as retaliatory rudeness.  The guy may not have intended for the press to show up, but apparently he's a public figure so it's not unforeseeable that something like that would happen.  I think he looks especially bad because he didn't even try to simply say something to her, but instead he spent the whole train ride trashing her with identifiable photos on twitter.  I don't think anyone comes out of that situation looking good. 

As for the mimes, I think that is also retaliatory rudeness.  It's fun to picture everyone who has ever annoyed you being surrounded by mimes, but just imagine yourself having a bad day and accidentally parking incorrectly, and then suddenly you are the one surrounded by mimes doing their best to publicly humiliate you. Not so funny then.

I agree it wouldn't be fun but it would help me to remember that even though I'm having a bad day, it doesn't mean I have the right to inconvenience others. I'd rather have my behavior pointed out to me so that I can correct the situation. Having a swarm of mimes surround me with pouty faces would probably make me smile while I went back to repark.

rose red

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Re: The Mime initiative
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2018, 09:13:54 AM »
I don't know if this is more a prank or calling people out, but does anyone remember the comic who holds "conversations" with strangers who are on their phone in public? Like a stranger would say on their phone "I can't stand Becky" and he would say on his own phone "I know! Becky is the worst!" or a stranger would say "Let's go for pizza" and he would say "Sure. I love pizza."

When the stranger confronts him all confused, he'll just say "What are you talking about? I'm talking with my mom on my phone."

MrTango

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Re: The Mime initiative
« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2018, 09:37:55 AM »
I don't know if this is more a prank or calling people out, but does anyone remember the comic who holds "conversations" with strangers who are on their phone in public? Like a stranger would say on their phone "I can't stand Becky" and he would say on his own phone "I know! Becky is the worst!" or a stranger would say "Let's go for pizza" and he would say "Sure. I love pizza."

When the stranger confronts him all confused, he'll just say "What are you talking about? I'm talking with my mom on my phone."

That's just annoying.

mime

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Re: The Mime initiative
« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2018, 11:26:19 AM »
The woman on her cell phone on the train was inconsiderate, certainly.  But I think that setting her up for public ridicule on twitter qualifies as retaliatory rudeness.  The guy may not have intended for the press to show up, but apparently he's a public figure so it's not unforeseeable that something like that would happen.  I think he looks especially bad because he didn't even try to simply say something to her, but instead he spent the whole train ride trashing her with identifiable photos on twitter.  I don't think anyone comes out of that situation looking good. 

As for the mimes, I think that is also retaliatory rudeness.  It's fun to picture everyone who has ever annoyed you being surrounded by mimes, but just imagine yourself having a bad day and accidentally parking incorrectly, and then suddenly you are the one surrounded by mimes doing their best to publicly humiliate you. Not so funny then.

I agree it wouldn't be fun but it would help me to remember that even though I'm having a bad day, it doesn't mean I have the right to inconvenience others. I'd rather have my behavior pointed out to me so that I can correct the situation. Having a swarm of mimes surround me with pouty faces would probably make me smile while I went back to repark.

First of all, I'm totally in favor of putting mimes to good use.  ;D

I heard of this news from Bogota many years ago. Having been an actual mime, after all, meant everyone I knew showed me any last bit of news on mimes. (So, like 3 stories in 25 years. ;) )

Now I suppose I'm biased, but I completely agree with Hmmmm. I try to be polite but I don't do everything perfectly. If I got the comical-friendly reminder that I was being a jerk to others, I'd give a chuckle and fix what I did wrong. Mimes make it easy to respond "lightly". A stranger approaching me and lecturing or scolding will make me more likely to dig in my heels or flat-out ignore them.

It is a good way to offer the friendly reminder to people who are receptive to that type of correction. It is probably embarrassing to the people who aren't receptive, but please forgive me: I find I have trouble caring about the embarrassment of people like that.

I agree with others that saying "just stop" or something more lengthy and polite is so often futile that it isn't worth the effort. I don't think of it as giving up. I think of it as acknowledging the reality of the people around us.