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Author Topic: Graduation open house menu help please?  (Read 1080 times)

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Oh Joy

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Re: Graduation open house menu help please?
« Reply #15 on: May 13, 2015, 08:44:33 PM »
It's important with graduations to know where you're fitting in people's days.  For example, you may have 50 family members who will be there the whole time and eat a full meal, and 150 school/community members who will be stopping by as the third of four open houses of the day and just have a small nibble if anything.

Do you have a feel for the composition and other open houses in your graduate's social & extracurricular groups?


EclecticLaydee

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Re: Graduation open house menu help please?
« Reply #16 on: May 13, 2015, 10:47:19 PM »
150 is pretty typical for open houses around here. That's about what we had at my daughter's last year. Because his is the day before graduation (we planned for some out of town family so they could attend both the open house and the graduation in a short period) there's not a lot of other open houses going on. I'd say about 75 people will be there the whole time and the other 75 for a shorter period spread throughout the day.

Thanks for your comments everyone. I'm going to take that and some comments from my meat world friends and do some menu adjusting. I appreciate the feedback!

Harriet Jones

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Re: Graduation open house menu help please?
« Reply #17 on: May 14, 2015, 06:59:38 AM »
150 people to celebrate a highschool graduation? Sorry, I just can't wrap my mind around that.

It's large, but it doesn't seem unreasonable, especially if it includes the graduate's friends and their families.

It's probably because in my native country we don't make such a big deal out of graduations. Highschool graduation celebrations usually only involve the nuclear family of the graduates and perhaps grandparents or an aunt or uncle they are really close to (but we did have a big BBQ with all the graduates (and just the graduates, no one else). Other family and friends might congratulate you when they see you the next time, but that's it.

When I got my PhD, the typical thing at my university was that the parents would host a reception for the research group you worked in and the professors on the panel. The reception was held in a meeting room in the department right after the defense and usually was champagne/orange juice/mimosas and finger food (usually mid-afternoon). Usually a significant other and in some cases a few friends would attend as well. So typically we are talking about 20 to 30 people. In the evening my parents took my fiance and myself out for a nice dinner.

Big parties aren't my thing, either, but what's the problem with having a big party to celebrate a life event?

I think we are just considering graduations as less of a life event than christenings, weddings etc.

That's fine.  I don't get why educational accomplishments would need to be minimized, though.

cross_patch

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Re: Graduation open house menu help please?
« Reply #18 on: May 14, 2015, 07:52:41 AM »
150 people to celebrate a highschool graduation? Sorry, I just can't wrap my mind around that.

What does whether you can get your head around it have to do with anything?

EllenS

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Re: Graduation open house menu help please?
« Reply #19 on: May 14, 2015, 09:46:35 AM »
150 people to celebrate a highschool graduation? Sorry, I just can't wrap my mind around that.

It's large, but it doesn't seem unreasonable, especially if it includes the graduate's friends and their families.

It's probably because in my native country we don't make such a big deal out of graduations. Highschool graduation celebrations usually only involve the nuclear family of the graduates and perhaps grandparents or an aunt or uncle they are really close to (but we did have a big BBQ with all the graduates (and just the graduates, no one else). Other family and friends might congratulate you when they see you the next time, but that's it.

When I got my PhD, the typical thing at my university was that the parents would host a reception for the research group you worked in and the professors on the panel. The reception was held in a meeting room in the department right after the defense and usually was champagne/orange juice/mimosas and finger food (usually mid-afternoon). Usually a significant other and in some cases a few friends would attend as well. So typically we are talking about 20 to 30 people. In the evening my parents took my fiance and myself out for a nice dinner.

Big parties aren't my thing, either, but what's the problem with having a big party to celebrate a life event?

I think we are just considering graduations as less of a life event than christenings, weddings etc.

That's fine.  I don't get why educational accomplishments would need to be minimized, though.

It's not just the educational accomplishment - high school graduation is, to many folks, a mile-marker for entering adulthood or coming of age.

Besides, it's all a matter of scale.  I've been to 20-person graduation parties and 150-person open houses. I've been to 6-person weddings and 600-person weddings. People throw parties according to the kind of party they like, not according to some absolute value of "importance".

Oh Joy

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Re: Graduation open house menu help please?
« Reply #20 on: May 14, 2015, 10:21:08 AM »
One of the great things about this forum is that we get to see how different events are celebrated in other communities. 

When DH came here, he didn't understand why such a big fuss was made out of something that he considers to be a basic life expectation, especially when higher education doesn't follow the same hoopla.  I explained that - here, at least - it's not about an extra reward for being able to pass high school classes.  It's more of a family celebration of the end of a life stage and the beginning of the next more independent one.  It's also the end of a broader social circle where whole families have interacted a lot for many years through their kids' extracurricular activities.  It's a seasonal part of the year here.

Hope that helps a bit for those who are surprised.

Hmmmmm

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Re: Graduation open house menu help please?
« Reply #21 on: May 14, 2015, 10:42:59 AM »
150 is pretty typical for open houses around here. That's about what we had at my daughter's last year. Because his is the day before graduation (we planned for some out of town family so they could attend both the open house and the graduation in a short period) there's not a lot of other open houses going on. I'd say about 75 people will be there the whole time and the other 75 for a shorter period spread throughout the day.

Thanks for your comments everyone. I'm going to take that and some comments from my meat world friends and do some menu adjusting. I appreciate the feedback!

For the shredded cheese, estimate a 1/4 ounce of cheese per planned taco serving, then add about 10% for spillage.
For meat, estimate 2 oz per taco. In my area it would be around a 60% beef to 40% chicken ratio.
For jalapenos we'd have at least a gallon jar and a couple of 24 oz jars for backup.
For Queso, I'd estimate 30z per person... some will eat more, some less. I'd also estimate about the same for chips.

QueenfaninCA

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Re: Graduation open house menu help please?
« Reply #22 on: May 14, 2015, 01:32:57 PM »
150 people to celebrate a highschool graduation? Sorry, I just can't wrap my mind around that.

It's large, but it doesn't seem unreasonable, especially if it includes the graduate's friends and their families.

It's probably because in my native country we don't make such a big deal out of graduations. Highschool graduation celebrations usually only involve the nuclear family of the graduates and perhaps grandparents or an aunt or uncle they are really close to (but we did have a big BBQ with all the graduates (and just the graduates, no one else). Other family and friends might congratulate you when they see you the next time, but that's it.

When I got my PhD, the typical thing at my university was that the parents would host a reception for the research group you worked in and the professors on the panel. The reception was held in a meeting room in the department right after the defense and usually was champagne/orange juice/mimosas and finger food (usually mid-afternoon). Usually a significant other and in some cases a few friends would attend as well. So typically we are talking about 20 to 30 people. In the evening my parents took my fiance and myself out for a nice dinner.

Big parties aren't my thing, either, but what's the problem with having a big party to celebrate a life event?

I think we are just considering graduations as less of a life event than christenings, weddings etc.

That's fine.  I don't get why educational accomplishments would need to be minimized, though.

It's not minimised, but graduating highschool is pretty much an expectation, so we don't see it as such a huge accomplishment. If you look at it that way, almost everyone older than the recent graduate has accomplished the same thing, so it's not something very special. In terms of adulthood, usually the 18th birthday is celebrated somewhat more than others, but still mostly with friends, not so much with lots of family.

Different countries, different customs.

Harriet Jones

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Re: Graduation open house menu help please?
« Reply #23 on: May 14, 2015, 02:00:21 PM »
150 people to celebrate a highschool graduation? Sorry, I just can't wrap my mind around that.

It's large, but it doesn't seem unreasonable, especially if it includes the graduate's friends and their families.

It's probably because in my native country we don't make such a big deal out of graduations. Highschool graduation celebrations usually only involve the nuclear family of the graduates and perhaps grandparents or an aunt or uncle they are really close to (but we did have a big BBQ with all the graduates (and just the graduates, no one else). Other family and friends might congratulate you when they see you the next time, but that's it.

When I got my PhD, the typical thing at my university was that the parents would host a reception for the research group you worked in and the professors on the panel. The reception was held in a meeting room in the department right after the defense and usually was champagne/orange juice/mimosas and finger food (usually mid-afternoon). Usually a significant other and in some cases a few friends would attend as well. So typically we are talking about 20 to 30 people. In the evening my parents took my fiance and myself out for a nice dinner.

Big parties aren't my thing, either, but what's the problem with having a big party to celebrate a life event?

I think we are just considering graduations as less of a life event than christenings, weddings etc.

That's fine.  I don't get why educational accomplishments would need to be minimized, though.

It's not minimised, but graduating highschool is pretty much an expectation, so we don't see it as such a huge accomplishment. If you look at it that way, almost everyone older than the recent graduate has accomplished the same thing, so it's not something very special. In terms of adulthood, usually the 18th birthday is celebrated somewhat more than others, but still mostly with friends, not so much with lots of family.

Different countries, different customs.

That's fine, but you don't need to make dismissive comments about how other people celebrate things.

jpcher

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Re: Graduation open house menu help please?
« Reply #24 on: May 14, 2015, 05:42:34 PM »
150 people to celebrate a highschool graduation? Sorry, I just can't wrap my mind around that.

Preparing tacos/nachos plus dessert and sides for 150 people is what I can't wrap my mind around ;) -- think of all that CHOPPING! :o

 ;D ;D

sweetonsno

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Re: Graduation open house menu help please?
« Reply #25 on: May 14, 2015, 07:27:57 PM »
I would also recommend adding more lettuce and more beans. I do like the idea of including some whole beans. They're delicious.

I vote for making more guacamole than you think you'll need, and perhaps including some chopped cilantro and limes for people ego squeeze over their tacos if they want them.
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Mammavan3

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Re: Graduation open house menu help please?
« Reply #26 on: May 19, 2015, 01:56:17 PM »
150 people to celebrate a highschool graduation? Sorry, I just can't wrap my mind around that.

It's large, but it doesn't seem unreasonable, especially if it includes the graduate's friends and their families.

It's probably because in my native country we don't make such a big deal out of graduations. Highschool graduation celebrations usually only involve the nuclear family of the graduates and perhaps grandparents or an aunt or uncle they are really close to (but we did have a big BBQ with all the graduates (and just the graduates, no one else). Other family and friends might congratulate you when they see you the next time, but that's it.

When I got my PhD, the typical thing at my university was that the parents would host a reception for the research group you worked in and the professors on the panel. The reception was held in a meeting room in the department right after the defense and usually was champagne/orange juice/mimosas and finger food (usually mid-afternoon). Usually a significant other and in some cases a few friends would attend as well. So typically we are talking about 20 to 30 people. In the evening my parents took my fiance and myself out for a nice dinner.

Big parties aren't my thing, either, but what's the problem with having a big party to celebrate a life event?

I think we are just considering graduations as less of a life event than christenings, weddings etc.

That's fine.  I don't get why educational accomplishments would need to be minimized, though.

It's not minimised, but graduating highschool is pretty much an expectation, so we don't see it as such a huge accomplishment. If you look at it that way, almost everyone older than the recent graduate has accomplished the same thing, so it's not something very special. In terms of adulthood, usually the 18th birthday is celebrated somewhat more than others, but still mostly with friends, not so much with lots of family.

Different countries, different customs.

It's also something of a farewell.  We're a somewhat mobile society, and there's a good chance you'll never see some of these people again. I now live in my HS town (after moving twice), and there are a good number of people I've not set eyes on since the last graduation party, more than 50 years ago.

And we're a party-loving people. I have one relative who had a little TGIF celebration for her children every Friday.

IMO there's no such thing as too many celebrations.

Goosey

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Re: Graduation open house menu help please?
« Reply #27 on: May 19, 2015, 02:03:21 PM »
It's not minimised, but graduating highschool is pretty much an expectation, so we don't see it as such a huge accomplishment. If you look at it that way, almost everyone older than the recent graduate has accomplished the same thing, so it's not something very special. In terms of adulthood, usually the 18th birthday is celebrated somewhat more than others, but still mostly with friends, not so much with lots of family.

Different countries, different customs.

Everyone has also been born, turned 15/16/21, etc but we still celebrate those things. After all, why do we celebrate birthdays? It's kind of expected that they're going to live another year.  ;)

Not everyone graduates high school and it's good to show that their academic endeavors, however expected they may be, are appreciated.

cicero

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Re: Graduation open house menu help please?
« Reply #28 on: May 24, 2015, 03:29:46 PM »
no idea about quantities but the menu looks yum

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