Author Topic: How much do you cater to "special" diets?  (Read 2234 times)

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greencat

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Re: How much do you cater to "special" diets?
« Reply #30 on: September 18, 2014, 02:40:01 PM »
I have catered to individuals before - the boyfriend with a peanut allergy was pretty safe at my place since I rarely eat peanuts myself (and no peanut butter at all!), and my cookware is almost all stainless anyway, so it's easy to allergy sanitize.  I was able to host a celiac guest - flour isn't really something I use all that much since I don't bake often.  I made meatballs that a friend on paleo could eat when we went to a potluck. 

I would not be able to host someone who kept strict kosher, unless I bought the food prepared elsewhere and used disposable plates and utensils - meat and dairy have been combined many times in my house.  I doubt that I could adequately meet halal restrictions either but I don't know as much about them aside from the slaughtering procedure.

Specky

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Re: How much do you cater to "special" diets?
« Reply #31 on: September 18, 2014, 03:13:35 PM »
I don't feel comfortable inflicting my needs on someone else's hospitality, so I turn down all invitations that center around eating. 

purple

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Re: How much do you cater to "special" diets?
« Reply #32 on: September 19, 2014, 12:30:31 AM »
I don't feel comfortable inflicting my needs on someone else's hospitality, so I turn down all invitations that center around eating.

If your friends and family are like me, you shouldn't turn down invitations because of your diet.  I bet they probably don't want you to! I don't mind whatsoever about providing food that everyone can eat and I bet they don't either!  :)

Allyson

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Re: How much do you cater to "special" diets?
« Reply #33 on: September 19, 2014, 12:49:04 AM »

But here's the thing. I don't invite every friend I have to every gathering I host. I pick & choose, according to some criteria for that particular event. So say I'm having a dinner party at my dining room table which seats eight. I'll choose three other couples. Which means I'm deliberately excluding every other couple we're friends with. That's not a bad thing.


I love this! I really think this every time someone complains about not being invited to a small event...I really don't think it can be called 'exclusion' at this point. Sure, if you have a huge party and don't invite one person, or if you invite all your coworkers but two then it might be a thing. But in my experience people have overlapping social circles and so you don't really have 'a group' of six people who do everything together a la cast of Friends. I think things would be different in such a social circle, but I don't really know anybody who operates that way.

There are all kinds of reasons I don't invite people to specific events, and it's typically more along the lines of "I can only pick a few people so my decisions are sort of arbitrary anyway" and I'm not sure that there's a better way to do it other than random draw or invite everyone I like to everyone which isn't really practical. I have a small apartment!

Deetee

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Re: How much do you cater to "special" diets?
« Reply #34 on: September 19, 2014, 02:24:31 AM »
OP here

One example of a diet I don't accommodate. One (close and awesome) friend was on a diet of raw sushi grade tuna, almond milk and one other item that I forget. He happened to be in town when we were hosting a dinner party. I invited him but told him he had to bring his own meal. I always remember setting his place with a sealed package of tuna and a sharp knife.


Thipu1

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Re: How much do you cater to "special" diets?
« Reply #35 on: September 22, 2014, 11:30:28 AM »
OP here

One example of a diet I don't accommodate. One (close and awesome) friend was on a diet of raw sushi grade tuna, almond milk and one other item that I forget. He happened to be in town when we were hosting a dinner party. I invited him but told him he had to bring his own meal. I always remember setting his place with a sealed package of tuna and a sharp knife.

Good grief!  That sounds much like the diet that a cat dermatologist prescribed for a CW's ailing tabby!

If someone is close enough to be invited for a meal at my home I have a pretty good idea of their dietary requirements.  If these are too extreme for me to handle, we'll meet at a restaurant of their
choosing and the meal will be our treat.  We've done this a few times and it's never been a problem.  If you like people enough to share a meal, there are ways to work around unusual diets. 

 

ladyknight1

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Re: How much do you cater to "special" diets?
« Reply #36 on: September 22, 2014, 03:01:51 PM »
I am very comfortable with cooking gluten free as my DH has a gluten intolerance. I cook meatless for my friends who are Halal or vegetarian.

The one thing I don't like to do is cook for someone with an aversion to a wide variety of foods. I have a friend who will not eat anything with beans or nuts in it because he does not like them. It makes things difficult as I frequently cook dishes with beans and bake with nuts. Fortunately, he brings what he wants to eat most of the time.

I won't cook for an anaphylactic allergy or vegan as I can't guarantee I meet those specifications.

Deetee

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Re: How much do you cater to "special" diets?
« Reply #37 on: Today at 12:27:25 AM »
OP here

One example of a diet I don't accommodate. One (close and awesome) friend was on a diet of raw sushi grade tuna, almond milk and one other item that I forget. He happened to be in town when we were hosting a dinner party. I invited him but told him he had to bring his own meal. I always remember setting his place with a sealed package of tuna and a sharp knife.

Good grief!  That sounds much like the diet that a cat dermatologist prescribed for a CW's ailing tabby!

If someone is close enough to be invited for a meal at my home I have a pretty good idea of their dietary requirements.  If these are too extreme for me to handle, we'll meet at a restaurant of their
choosing and the meal will be our treat.  We've done this a few times and it's never been a problem.  If you like people enough to share a meal, there are ways to work around unusual diets. 

 

It was an odd diet. I felt a little bad as we served a seriously fantastic meal and he had his tuna and almond milk. (I cannot remember that third ingredient-green tea? soy beans?) but it was a last minute invite that he was free to accept or decline.

I suppose that raises some other issues. He was/is struggling with various health issues that are mental and physical. As I said before he is a good friend and a great guy. But his issues make him seriously flaky. So I just invite him to whatever is happening and don't expect him. Oddly, he has never stood us up. But we keep the expectations very, very low.