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  • May 02, 2016, 06:31:57 PM

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Author Topic: Appearance vs. Service (S/O Snobby Caterer)  (Read 2013 times)

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zyrs

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Re: Appearance vs. Service (S/O Snobby Caterer)
« Reply #30 on: Today at 02:36:54 PM »
My wife and I play video games as one of our hobbies.  We have a number of systems and a number of games.  And we love to visit used game shops because there are a few games we missed buying when they came out.  I bought my first game system when I was 27 and that was in the 1980s.  So we are both older.

We can sped a bunch of money, if you have what we want and don't treat us like pond scum because we are older.  But we have been treated poorly a couple of times.



mime

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Re: Appearance vs. Service (S/O Snobby Caterer)
« Reply #31 on: Today at 03:06:03 PM »
I've been there-- going to Home Depot in a dress. I attempted to flag down *five* salespeople before finding one that didn't wave me off. When I finally got one, all of his questions implied that I was there on an errand for my husband who must be the *real* customer. It was a different story at Lowe's, who got a very happy returning customer.

DH and I also got that at a furniture store. We were dressed a bit casually, but I think the bigger factor was that we were young: 24 and 26, and we looked young for our age. We were followed around, given plenty of advice on the types of items we 'must' want, and on what we could (or couldn't) afford. That got old quickly. We moved on were very happy with an Amish store's quality and service instead.

I also had a relative who did very well investing and running a side-business working on cars.... but his appearance made him look like he lived in the alley. He actually enjoyed going to the banks looking extra-scruffy, getting the brush-off from nicely dressed clerks, and then "playing around" with $1million or so with the few workers who didn't judge (or by the bank president himself, who found the whole situation very amusing, and a bit embarrassing). He actually did this for entertainment.

Oh, and another comment about Ulta: I also have consistently excellent experiences there. I may be standing there looking like I've never touched an ounce of makeup or even heard the word "conditioner", but I'm greeted and treated very well every time.



violinp

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Re: Appearance vs. Service (S/O Snobby Caterer)
« Reply #32 on: Today at 03:17:45 PM »
I've been there-- going to Home Depot in a dress. I attempted to flag down *five* salespeople before finding one that didn't wave me off. When I finally got one, all of his questions implied that I was there on an errand for my husband who must be the *real* customer. It was a different story at Lowe's, who got a very happy returning customer.

DH and I also got that at a furniture store. We were dressed a bit casually, but I think the bigger factor was that we were young: 24 and 26, and we looked young for our age. We were followed around, given plenty of advice on the types of items we 'must' want, and on what we could (or couldn't) afford. That got old quickly. We moved on were very happy with an Amish store's quality and service instead.

I also had a relative who did very well investing and running a side-business working on cars.... but his appearance made him look like he lived in the alley. He actually enjoyed going to the banks looking extra-scruffy, getting the brush-off from nicely dressed clerks, and then "playing around" with $1million or so with the few workers who didn't judge (or by the bank president himself, who found the whole situation very amusing, and a bit embarrassing). He actually did this for entertainment.

Oh, and another comment about Ulta: I also have consistently excellent experiences there. I may be standing there looking like I've never touched an ounce of makeup or even heard the word "conditioner", but I'm greeted and treated very well every time.

POD. Ulta employees are so helpful and nice, but know when to back off. It's rare in a store these days. At Books - A - Million, I can barely find anyone to help me. Usually, I'm just browsing and it's fine, but if I really don't know where anything is, and I'm in a hurry, it's more than a little frustrating.

I guess I should be glad the BAM employees don't glare at me anymore, though. My sister went in to browse, and I followed her in, and I got suspicious looks and glares the whole time. The only thing I can think is I looked 4 years younger than I actually was somehow (I still get people guessing my age at about 10 years younger than my actual age), so they were worried I was a miscreant kid, even though I was a perfectly responsible 16 year old.
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


Harriet Jones

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Re: Appearance vs. Service (S/O Snobby Caterer)
« Reply #33 on: Today at 03:26:11 PM »
I was told to leave a car dealership once, not because of how I was dressed, but because I looked young -- I'm sure they didn't think I was a serious shopper.  All of the other dealerships I visited treated me politely, even if they might not think I was going to buy a car that day.

GardenGal

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Re: Appearance vs. Service (S/O Snobby Caterer)
« Reply #34 on: Today at 03:32:25 PM »
When I was in college my anthropology professor told this story. She went to a large New York City department store very humbly dressed (I forget why) and the clerk was rude to her.  Professor thought it was because of what she was wearing, so she got dressed up very nicely and the same clerk, who clearly didn't recognize her, was all over her trying to be helpful. My professor said she kept the clerk busy for a while but didn't buy anything in the end.  I don't think professor told the clerk why she wouldn't buy from her.

camlan

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Re: Appearance vs. Service (S/O Snobby Caterer)
« Reply #35 on: Today at 04:50:05 PM »
There was the time I was in the market to buy my first house. I was interviewing agents. Walked into one office, the agent asked me where my husband was, as he wanted to talk to both of us together. I cheerfully told him that I wasn't married. He recommended that I continue to rent until I had a husband, who would know how to buy a house.

Back to my retail days--one time just before Christmas, a guy entered the fine china/crystal section of my department. I bopped on over and asked if I could help. He bought about $1000 in Waterford crystal for gifts. As I was ringing everything up, he commented that usually he shopped in our store wearing a suit, instead of the Boba Fett t-shirt and jeans he was wearing that day. Over in the men's department, he usually got great service, but no one had approached him that day. And he complimented me on helping him out.

And then, after I'd moved on to the next customer, he sought out a manager and told her! Which was very nice of him. But it does show that people really do notice how they are treated. If you want someone to come back to your store and spend their money, you treat them nicely.

Or if you're an agent for a new housing development, you don't turn away the person who shows up in jeans. Even if they can't afford your houses, it's possible they are there for their parents, or friends. And that's another potential sale you've turned away.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


jpcher

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Re: Appearance vs. Service (S/O Snobby Caterer)
« Reply #36 on: Today at 06:31:03 PM »
Isn't there a saying that goes something on the order of "be careful of who you look down on because tomorrow you may be kissing their a--".

We've been looked down on because we vacation on motorcycles.  Each cost over $20 K but most people don't know that.

We were heading south on vacation after work one day and ran into a horrible thunderstorm.  We pulled into a restaurant and stood under the awning to drip dry before going inside - we were drowned rats.  A waitress came out and told us to move along - they didn't cater to our kind of people.  OK.  As we turned to leave, the cook came out with towels  and told us to come on in.  After ordering from the same waitress, we heard the cook telling her that our bikes cost more than her house and he expected her to treat all his customers the same.  Yep - he was the owner.  We were told our meal was on the house because of the way we treated.  We told him that his attitude was more than enough to make up for it and left our regular tip also. 

I was raised to treat everyone the same.  We all share the same problems and goals so why be unpleasant or hard on people because you "think"  they're not in your league?  Makes no sense to me.

Great story, Phoebelion!

Yes, it was hit or miss with us when we were on the bike. Some treated us with fear (only Hells Angels ride bikes!) some said there was no room at the inn, and others gawked at the bike and wanted to hear all our stories . . . this particular month-long trip was a graduation gift for LDH, he just received his MBA. We both had great jobs.

About half-way through the trip we reached San Antonio, were planning on a two night stay and were ready to splurge on an upscale hotel with amenities (pool, hot tub, room service) and walking distance to the river walk and Alamo . . . you know, pricey.

We pulled up to the front door, I got off the bike (usual mode, LDH waited with the bike while I went in to get a room), looked at LDH and said "They're never going to let us in. Look at me! (no make-up, worn jeans, tank top, wind-blown, sun soaked and felt oh.so.tattered) Look at them! (other patrons who were dressed to the nines)" LDH said "Never know until you try."

So I walked up to the front door. Doorman stood stoically with his hands behind his back and didn't give me a glance. I straightened my shoulders, stood up tall, chin up, gracious smile on my face and opened my own dingdangity door.

Went straight to the check-in counter:

Clerk (excellent attitude right off the bat): How may I help you today?

Me: I'm sorry, we don't have reservations but I was wondering if you have a room available for at least two nights and I'd very much appreciate a space in your parking garage.

Clerk: Let me look into that. (moved to his computer) How long have you been on the road?

Me: About two weeks now.

Clerk (wow, nice trip? general chit-chat): And where is your bike now?

Me: My husband is waiting out front.

Clerk (working between computer and phone): Okay. I think I have you set. Xroom with jacuzzi bath. I'm only charging you for the standard room and if you need more than two nights please let me know by Xtime tomorrow. Tell your husband to pull up to the parking garage office, they have a space next to the office for your bike. It will be watched. Bell hop will be waiting at the garage door for your luggage.

Me (silent :o :o :o ): Thank you very much!

That was the best service I ever received while I was in my very worst attire. Quite frankly? I was extremely surprised.