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Author Topic: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74  (Read 4012360 times)

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ladyknight1

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11610 on: January 30, 2018, 02:14:15 PM »
Some companies and bosses just don't care. Others would very much prefer that you stay home & recuperate.

I have 3 kinds of PTO - vacation, sick, and floating holidays. I just use whichever one has the appropriate # of hours banked. :-)

Same here. Also, I was speaking with a colleague earlier, who tried to use sick leave for an early afternoon departure, and had to change her time sheet to reflect it was annual leave, not sick. YMMV.
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jedikaiti

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11611 on: January 30, 2018, 02:15:44 PM »
One boss* repeatedly cancelled my leave [after agreeing it] three times one year.  I had a whole year without any time off.  She told me I could carry it forward, and because I hadn't had a holiday, I would be allowed an extra two months to use it up [end March, rather than January].  Then at the beginning of January she said I couldn't take till late March, so I would have to lose it.

Nope.  Took the rest of January off; she'd cured me of feeling guilty and responsible for staffing problems [lots of persistent depression/stress illness among her staff], so I didn't mind that they had two temps covering and no permanent staff on.  She'd driven away the third colleague I had in less than a year, and I was searching for a new job; sacking me wouldn't have helped her any, as she would be trying to replace both receptionists.

Her attitude backfired, though: I had the 'flu, and would have struggled in after the three days we were allowed as self-certification sick days, but she insisted I see a doctor...

I did, and he signed me off for two full weeks [from the day I saw him], and told me not to go in, and he would speak to my boss if she gave me any problems, and extend the sick note if I needed it.  I did need it, but by then daren't take another day, so took the chances of infecting the rest of my colleagues.

Ah, the joys of working for HR. ::) :'(

* I think I've mentioned her before: we could hear her screaming at people, even with both sets of doors closed between reception and her victim office. :'(

Why does she still have a job?
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katiescarlett

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11612 on: January 30, 2018, 02:24:33 PM »
I'm lucky that I get 10 hours of sick time per month and 10 hours of vacation per month. We also get off all legal holidays, and 8 hours of birthday leave. As my birthday is July 3rd, I frequently receive several days off in a row without having to use vacation, (if I choose to use my leave on my birthday) depending on what day the holiday and my birthday falls.

It averages out to about 2.3 weeks of sick and 2.3 weeks of vacation per year, which is plenty, and I am rarely sick since my tonsillectomy, so I always have around 100 hours of sick leave to use. Vacation is different, depending on when I take it, and I'm allowed to carry over 70 hours into the new year, so it adds up fast. This is really good since I'll be in Scotland for almost 2 weeks in May.

Aleko

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11613 on: January 30, 2018, 02:29:46 PM »
Quote
I think that there's a bit of paranoia here about calling sick on Monday or Friday. If you are a perpetual abuser of sick leave, then you'll probably get the side eye. But, if you're like the previous posters here who aren't even using their sick time when they should, then a normal boss isn't going to jump to "Hungover" when you call sick on Monday.

I used to suffer from really crippling menstrual cramps, even when I was on the pill. No painkillers would cut it, so I did quite often have to call in sick. One day my manager said openly to me that she found it fishy that I always seemed to have menstrual cramps on Fridays, and I pointed out that the pill kept my cycle to a rigid 28-day routine. She accepted this, but it was obviously a shot across my bows. On the first day of my period next month I not only had the usual cramps but was coming down with a viral illness. I felt I simply couldn't ring in sick so I came in to work and took the anti-flu medication plus in desperation took my usual painkillers on top, although of course I knew perfectly well you shouldn't do that. I was data centre manager and worked alone in the basement where the files were kept; the usual stacks of returned files needed attention so I started in on them. Seven hours later it occurred to someone that nobody had seen me all day although there had been a staff meeting and a cake for someone's birthday. A colleague came down and found me filing on autopilot, with no idea what time it was and having literally no memory at all of the day.


Shalamar

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11614 on: January 30, 2018, 04:31:27 PM »
Quote
I always tried to drag myself in and leave shortly after (to show I really was sick).

I've always got a weird defensiveness about thinking that people will think I'm faking being ill, partly because of an old supervisor I used to have.   I had to call him one day because I had a bad cold:

Me:  Hello, Boss?  This is Shalamar, and *proceeds to have a minute-long coughing fit*.  I won't be in today, because I'm not feeling well.
Him:  You have GOT to be kidding.  That's the fakest cough I've ever heard.

nutraxfornerves

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11615 on: January 30, 2018, 06:33:23 PM »
Genuine call-in-sick Darwinism, that I posted before. It was a caller to a radio show asking for best fake sick call in.

One guy decided to take a three-day weekend and go to Las Vegas. However, he forgot to call in sick until he was at the airport. He recounted how he left a message on the boss's voice mail, complete with carefully staged hoarse voice and coughing.

Monday morning, when he got to work, he was asked to step into the boss's office. The boss said not a word, but simply replayed his answering machine. Despite all the sniffling and coughing, it was easy to hear a distinct voice in the background, intoning "Flight number 345 now boarding for Las Vegas."

Fortunately, he said, the boss thought it was hilarious. I don't remember if the guy was even docked a day's pay.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2018, 12:05:06 AM by nutraxfornerves »

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HoneyBee42

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11616 on: January 30, 2018, 07:24:30 PM »
[Details fudged for privacy]. I had an employee who started calling in sick almost every Monday. I was beginning the process of documenting it so I could justify demanding a doctor’s note, when Employee discovered the source of the problem in a rather alarming manner.

Employee spent the weekend out of town and returned home to a smell of natural gas. Employee called the gas company. The technician took one look at his meter and yelled “Get out! I’m calling the fire department!”  The fire department evacuated the neighborhood.

It turns out that a gas line had been improperly installed in Employee’s new house. Over the course of a few months, it began working loose. Although there wasn’t yet a smell, there was enough gas to make Employee ill after being home all weekend. Employee would call in sick on Monday, then, fearing to lose too many sick leave days, drag in on Tuesday, and, of course, immediately feel better. The gas line had somehow become very loose over that weekend away.

Employee got a very nice settlement from the house builder.

That is terrifying! I'm glad it was discovered before someone was killed by it.
No kidding, I once lived in a city where a house blew up because of that sort of reason (although most times, it seems like it's either part of an insurance fraud scheme or trying to cover up another crime, like murder).

VorFemme

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11617 on: January 30, 2018, 07:51:21 PM »
I got a phone call from the police about a someone who worked in the same company's house blowing up (not a coworker - but worked at a different building & we were sort of the HR unit - military & I'm trying to sort out what happened in more familiar terms).  There was an investigation that determined that there were scratches on the gas pipe consistent with a wrench - but as there had been people working on the gas line as well as a marriage going sour & threats from their spouse...well, no fingerprints on the wrench at the scene and it was the 1980s, so no CSI unit to use a microscope to match or rule out the wrench found on the scene, in the wreckage of the kitchen.

The house...after the mess was cleaned up, what was left was a concrete slab foundation that needed very little else demolished to clear the remains of the house away.  I don't think that it got rebuilt...

But it left me with an impression of why you don't mess around & delay if you smell gas...

As an attempted assassination, it didn't work - but the divorce did go through after the lawyers started citing "irreconcilable differences" after that.  No arguments about additional attempts at marriage counseling...this was long before digital cameras and cheap computers in the home....
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Bada

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11618 on: January 30, 2018, 08:03:16 PM »
Concerning update about the Hawaii missile "threat"

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/top-official-resigns-after-false-missile-alert-in-hawaii/ar-BBItpOD?OCID=ansmsnnews11

Quote
The fallout [high official resigning] came the same day the Federal Communications Commission revealed that the worker who pushed out the alert thought an actual attack was imminent. It was the first indication the Jan. 13 alert was purposely sent, adding another level of confusion to the misstep that left residents and tourists believing their lives were about to end.

The state emergency agency worker believed the attack was real because of a mistake in how the drill was initiated during a shift change, the FCC said in a report. The worker said he didn't hear the word "exercise" repeated six times even though others clearly heard it.

...

The worker, who was fired Friday and whose name has not been revealed, has confused real-life events and drills in the past, the state said in a report. His poor performance has been documented for years, and other members of the team say they were not comfortable working with him in any role.

The employee heard a recorded message that began by saying "exercise, exercise, exercise" — the script for a drill, the FCC said. Then the recording used language that is typically used for a real threat, not a drill: "this is not a drill." The recording ended by saying "exercise, exercise, exercise."

Once the employee sent the false alert, he was directed to send a cancel message but instead "just sat there and didn't respond," according to the state's report on its internal investigation. Later, another employee took over the computer and sent the correction because the worker "seemed confused."

Morticia

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11619 on: January 30, 2018, 08:07:26 PM »
It kind of sounds like he was high.
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Reika

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11620 on: January 30, 2018, 08:42:09 PM »
It kind of sounds like he was high.

Agreed.

Though it was kind of the authorities not to release the person's name.

WolfWay

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11621 on: January 30, 2018, 11:01:06 PM »
I am surprised by how many people have "sick leave." My company provides "PTO" (personal time off) that can be used for whatever. I get 30 days of PTO every year, and can carry over a certain amount of unused days to the next year. I imagine that the company would frown on me "calling in" PTO for 30 days straight (for example), but generally speaking people will request PTO for vacations (and get this approved - lots of us take one-two week vacations), and will use PTO as needed in addition to that. So I might use a PTO day because my child is sick and needs to stay home from school, or because it is a really nice day in the summer and I want to go to the beach, or because I want to sleep in and get a super long workout in, because I have the flu, or in the case of one of my co-workers, because her dog ran away and she was super depressed. Unless I am supposed to be in court or something, the company does not care why I am using my *personal* time off. There is no separate "sick time."

I think such a system makes a lot of sense. Otherwise, who gets to decide what is "sick enough?" Does the company want someone coming in who is ill and might get others ill? Does the company want employees to be physically present but mentally not there?
Where I work, per year, I have 20 days of PTO (annual leave), but I also have 15 - 20 days of sick leave per year (I forget the exact number of sick days).

If I'm off sick for one day (on a Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday that is not next to a public holiday) I don't have to provide a sick note.

If I'm off sick on a Monday or a Friday (or a day next to a public holiday) then I have to provide a sick note.

If I'm off for more than one day, I need to provide a sick note.

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Winterlight

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11622 on: January 30, 2018, 11:41:32 PM »
It kind of sounds like he was high.

Agreed.

Though it was kind of the authorities not to release the person's name.

They probably don't want him torn to shreds by an enraged citizenry.
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siamesecat2965

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11623 on: January 31, 2018, 07:39:50 AM »
Some companies and bosses just don't care. Others would very much prefer that you stay home & recuperate.

I have 3 kinds of PTO - vacation, sick, and floating holidays. I just use whichever one has the appropriate # of hours banked. :-)

Same here. Also, I was speaking with a colleague earlier, who tried to use sick leave for an early afternoon departure, and had to change her time sheet to reflect it was annual leave, not sick. YMMV.

My company has generous vacation etc. aka PTO. Technically its vacation, persondal days and floating holidays, but really its all considered PTO. When you leave, you are paid for unused vacation, but not the FH or PD, so they actually encourage you to use those first. we don't accrue; we get it all every Jan 1.

Sick time; we don't have any set number of sick days, but our policy is you can take what you need, and are allowed three "occurrences" of no more than five days, during any rolling 12 month period. so if you're out for 2 days, then 6 months later, take another day, you're fine. And if you're out for any length of time, STD kicks in, so the sick policy is overridden by that.

My company really is very flexible about that, and if you need to leave early, come in late etc. as long as its not abused. for example, next week, my mom has a dr. appt she wants me to come with her to. and her car needs to go in for service. So i'll go, take the day off for the appt, drive her car back (she lives about 30 mins from me, and uses my mechanic). i'll drop it off, they'll have the next day to work on it but due to it getting dark etc. early, i;ll wait until lunch the following day, get her car, drive it back, get mine, and come home and continue working. I can also work from home, as needed. my boss was fine with me taking an extended lucnh.




hjaye

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Re: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74
« Reply #11624 on: January 31, 2018, 08:02:07 AM »
I inadvertently posted this in the Student PD thread.  Since the subject of calling in sick has come up again,  just in case someone hasn't read the Student PD thread, I've reposted it here.

A number of years ago, I worked for an Armored Car company as a Driver/Guard.  There was another Driver/Guard, Harold, who worked there as well.  Harold was a slacker in all that he did, but being as how management had enough problems constantly trying to find warm bodies to fill in their schedules, unless you got caught stealing or flagrantly breaking security rules they were not going to fire you.

Harold was like clockwork whenever a holiday came around, he would always, without fail call in sick the day before a holiday.  Christmas 1981 fell on a Friday, and sure enough Harold called in sick on Thursday.  The Operations Manager had Gordon fill in for Harold.  Gordon was a good worker. He was easy to get along with, had a great attitude, and everyone liked him.

Harold, being the slacker that he was, was not very diligent when it came to running his route.  He never really took note of who was outside and around the truck whenever he got out to go into a store.  He never paid attention to his surroundings, his environment, nor was he very quick.  He would stroll and take his take his time whenever he was picking up deposits and delivering change orders.

In other words, Harold was the type of guard that crooks look for as they case different routes trying to find one they think will be an easy mark for robbing.  One such crook decided that Thursday December 24th would be a good day to rob Harold, except that Harold wasn’t there. 
Gordon noticed the suspicious man as he came out of the store, but it was too late, the crook had his gun out and he had the drop on Gordon.  If the crook had just wanted the money in his hand, it probably would have been ok, but he wanted what was in the truck.  He led Gordon to the truck, and this is where no one is sure what went wrong, but the crook turned into a murderer and shot Gordon in the back and ran off.

Gordon was shot and killed the day before Christmas, Harold got his day off, but no one wanted to work with him after that.  He wasn’t fired, but within six months Harold quit, no one was sorry to see him go