Author Topic: Professional Darwinism: Update to OP on p.74  (Read 1468915 times)

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AM in AL

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Re: Professional Darwinism
« Reply #195 on: February 25, 2010, 12:47:47 PM »
Quote:
That reminds me of a mild Professional Darwinism. I say mild because I don't think the person saw it coming. Friend calls out of work for having the flu. Friend then gets 'caught' playing hooky and fired. Where did she get caught? In the drugstore getting medicine. Apparently a co-worker had gone there too at the same time and saw her, and didn't think she looked that sick while waiting in checkout for her medication. Friend got a call saying if she wanted to keep her job she had to come in. So she went in, for fear of losing her job, just to get fired for coming in sick.  ::) ETA: I should point out that they can actually do that due to the Health Hazard involved.

Unquote:

I don't completely understand how this is professional darwinism?  It seems much more like a very nasty catch-22 (sick enough to need meds so went to get them, told to come in since well enough to go out, fire because came in sick).  Could you explain your thinking?

I agree that this one sounds hinky. Let's say that I leave the office - say, last Friday, after ... um... losing my lunch. Does the fact that I later drag my yuggy self out of the house to replace the empty bottle of Pepto mean I'm not legit? Or am I ok because I look like death warmed over?

kingsrings

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Re: Professional Darwinism
« Reply #196 on: February 25, 2010, 12:53:35 PM »
I used to work in the HR dept. of a major hotel as part of a high school work internship a while ago. Of course since they were HR the majority of what they did was job interviews, so I got to be witness to quite a few doozies. It really instilled in me as a high schooler just starting out how NOT to act in a job interview. A couple that stood out was the young lady who for some unknown reason, brought her BF with her into the job interview. The first thing she said was although her name was Lisa, she wanted to be called ‘Flame’. She appeared to be stoned and came across as one of those stereotyped flighty hippie chicks. A few minutes after the job interview ended, she and her BF came back because she said she had given an incorrect phone number. She said she had realized she had given the incorrect number, but was too embarrassed to correct it. But then she said that her BF told her it might make her look bad if she didn’t correct it, so that’s why she was back. Then there was the young man who was being asked the typical job interview questions. When he was asked at the end why the hotel should hire him, he hemmed and hawed, then answered, “I don’t know”. My boss and I always had a good laugh after these doozies.

nutraxfornerves

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Re: Professional Darwinism
« Reply #197 on: February 25, 2010, 02:37:37 PM »
I remembered another one. A local radio station did a story on this kind of stuff & asked listeners to call in with their stories.

One guy decided to take a three-day weekend and go to Las Vegas. However, he forgot to call in sick until he was at the airport. He recounted how he left a message on the boss's email, complete with carefully staged hoarse voice and coughing.

Monday morning, when he got to work, he was asked to step into the boss's office. The boss said not a work, but simply replayed his answering machine. Despite all the sniffling and coughing, it was easy to hear a distinct voice in the background, intoning "Flight number 345 now boarding for Las Vegas."

Fortunately, he said, the boss thought it was hilarious. I don't remember if the guy was even docked a day's pay.

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SkyTalon

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Re: Professional Darwinism
« Reply #198 on: February 25, 2010, 11:30:12 PM »
Quote:
That reminds me of a mild Professional Darwinism. I say mild because I don't think the person saw it coming. Friend calls out of work for having the flu. Friend then gets 'caught' playing hooky and fired. Where did she get caught? In the drugstore getting medicine. Apparently a co-worker had gone there too at the same time and saw her, and didn't think she looked that sick while waiting in checkout for her medication. Friend got a call saying if she wanted to keep her job she had to come in. So she went in, for fear of losing her job, just to get fired for coming in sick.  ::) ETA: I should point out that they can actually do that due to the Health Hazard involved.

Unquote:

I don't completely understand how this is professional darwinism?  It seems much more like a very nasty catch-22 (sick enough to need meds so went to get them, told to come in since well enough to go out, fire because came in sick).  Could you explain your thinking?

I agree that this one sounds hinky. Let's say that I leave the office - say, last Friday, after ... um... losing my lunch. Does the fact that I later drag my yuggy self out of the house to replace the empty bottle of Pepto mean I'm not legit? Or am I ok because I look like death warmed over?


Well, as I said, Friend didn't look like death warmed over. I consider it a mild Darwinism because it was her decision  to go out while sick that ended up removing her from the Job Pool. Also since due to the job's nature was that coming into work was grounds for automatic firing, it wasn't the best idea of hers to go in.


It still sucks either way.
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gardengirl

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Re: Professional Darwinism
« Reply #199 on: February 26, 2010, 12:57:32 AM »
I agree that one could be sitting up because one couldn't breathe lying down, and it's no worse to be using the computer than reading a magazine or watching TV...but out of respect for my employer, I wouldn't post online until after working hours, just as I wouldn't go out to run a non-necessary errand until after hours (I slept all day, and now I feel SOO much better!) I'll make an exception for people who are at the store picking up decongestants and orange juice, and looking miserable as they do so,

Not to threadjack, but I'm always surprised that anyone feels they have to hide when they've taken off sick time.  Sick time is a benefit that you get, often in lieu of larger pay or something else.  And since it's awfully hard to tell if someone's sick unless they have some sort of headcold, how would you judge whether someone's sick or not?  And why would I need to worry about my employer finding out I posted to an online forum when I was off?  I was off.  I was using my sick time, not trying to scam them somehow.  I really can't imagine reporting someone because I saw them doing something when they were off sick, unless they were constantly off and sticking everyone else with their work.  And if they were off that much, wouldn't they run out of sick time anyway?

I don't understand how you would be disrespectful to your employer by taking a sick day and doing an errand or using the computer, no matter what Miss Manners says.

PeterM

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Re: Professional Darwinism
« Reply #200 on: February 26, 2010, 02:04:46 AM »
I don't understand how you would be disrespectful to your employer by taking a sick day and doing an errand or using the computer, no matter what Miss Manners says.

I can understand the idea that you shouldn't take sick days unless you're actually not fit to work in some way or other. I personally have no problem with people who use sick days solely for errands or other non-sickness related needs, as long as it doesn't get out of hand. Especially if it's set up in advance and coverage is arranged. But at best that's a slippery slope, and anyone who says sick time should only be used for sickness, period, isn't going at all overboard in my opinion.

But as you say, if you are sick, that's the end of it. If you stay home because you have a migraine, or a lousy stomach, or whatever, that's a legitimate reason to not go into work, and as far as I'm concerned work should have no interest whatsoever in what else you do with your day, within some very broad limits. The idea that someone who takes a sick day should stay off the computer for fear of someone from the office deciding they're not really sick is absolutely ludicrous, in my opinion. You don't have to be immobile in bed for the entire day to qualify for a sick day, you just have to be in a state where going to work would make you very uncomfortable and/or put others at risk of catching whatever you might happen to have. "I've got a cold and feel like crap" is plenty good reason to call in sick and go back to bed. If later on you wake up and noodle around the internet, who cares? Most for-fun internet activities don't require nearly as much attention and thought as work activities, for one thing, and being able to concentrate on a computer in the comfort of your own home while sick is much, much easier than doing the same basic thing at work.

And the idea of being tattled on for daring to leave your home to go and buy medicine leaves me absolutely appalled. As far as I'm concerned the only person who should have been fired in that mess is the person who actually thought it was appropriate to fire the sick woman. What if someone had seen her driving herself to the doctor? Would that also be proof that she's obviously well enough to work? Bah. As you said, sick leave is a benefit given to workers, it's not a privilege that needs to be defended and justified every time you dare to make use of it.

cass2591

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Re: Professional Darwinism
« Reply #201 on: February 26, 2010, 02:40:57 AM »
I don't understand how you would be disrespectful to your employer by taking a sick day and doing an errand or using the computer, no matter what Miss Manners says.

 I personally have no problem with people who use sick days solely for errands or other non-sickness related needs, as long as it doesn't get out of hand. Especially if it's set up in advance and coverage is arranged.

But if it's set up in advance and coverage is arranged, how can it be called a "sick day"? Paid time off or a vacation day, sure, but I never had a supervisor who would sanction a sick day when she knew full well it wasn't. And I never would have had the nerve to ask someone to cover for me and then use the day as sick time.

I used to work in a hospital, so when another nurse called in sick we were either scrambling for someone to cover her shift, or we were short staffed. I think it's one thing if you call in sick and the only one who suffers is you, because when you go back you have to make up for the work you didn't do, but when you leave your coworkers in the lurch, that's quite another.
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MariaE

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Re: Professional Darwinism
« Reply #202 on: February 26, 2010, 03:15:36 AM »
Quote:
That reminds me of a mild Professional Darwinism. I say mild because I don't think the person saw it coming. Friend calls out of work for having the flu. Friend then gets 'caught' playing hooky and fired. Where did she get caught? In the drugstore getting medicine. Apparently a co-worker had gone there too at the same time and saw her, and didn't think she looked that sick while waiting in checkout for her medication. Friend got a call saying if she wanted to keep her job she had to come in. So she went in, for fear of losing her job, just to get fired for coming in sick.  ::) ETA: I should point out that they can actually do that due to the Health Hazard involved.

Unquote:

I don't completely understand how this is professional darwinism?  It seems much more like a very nasty catch-22 (sick enough to need meds so went to get them, told to come in since well enough to go out, fire because came in sick).  Could you explain your thinking?

I agree that this one sounds hinky. Let's say that I leave the office - say, last Friday, after ... um... losing my lunch. Does the fact that I later drag my yuggy self out of the house to replace the empty bottle of Pepto mean I'm not legit? Or am I ok because I look like death warmed over?


Well, as I said, Friend didn't look like death warmed over. I consider it a mild Darwinism because it was her decision  to go out while sick that ended up removing her from the Job Pool. Also since due to the job's nature was that coming into work was grounds for automatic firing, it wasn't the best idea of hers to go in.


It still sucks either way.
If it had been a frivolous errand, I'd agree. But she was getting medicine, which she probably needed. As for coming in, it sounds like she was going to get fired either way.

I'm with the PP - I'd have contacted a lawyer.
 
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hot_shaker

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Re: Professional Darwinism
« Reply #203 on: February 26, 2010, 08:15:45 AM »
Well, as I said, Friend didn't look like death warmed over. I consider it a mild Darwinism because it was her decision  to go out while sick that ended up removing her from the Job Pool. Also since due to the job's nature was that coming into work was grounds for automatic firing, it wasn't the best idea of hers to go in.

It still sucks either way.

I just don't see how you can place any blame the sick co-worker at all.  She was went out to get medicine . . . because she was sick.  Perhaps medicine that if she didn't leave her home to purchase would mean additional days off.  The busy-body co-worker saw her at a drugstore, not the liquor store!

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RingTailedLemur

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Re: Professional Darwinism
« Reply #204 on: February 26, 2010, 10:01:40 AM »
Here's another.  A friend of a friend applied for a job, and for a reference gave the name of the boss who'd just fired him.  Who had sacked him for gross misconduct and thought he was a disgrace.

Apparently the new workplace rang him up and had to hold the phone a foot away.  He didn't get the job, but they did tell him why.

Some companies insist that one of your referees is your previous employer, no matter what happened.

BabyMama

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Re: Professional Darwinism
« Reply #205 on: February 26, 2010, 10:11:25 AM »
Update to Post #1:  Bob called me at 6:30a this morning saying he had hit a patch of ice and blew a tire and wouldn't be in.  (Odd, I didn't see any ice when I was driving in, but I digress...)  Two hours later, his Facebook is updated with "Icy today, think I'll stay home."  We're supposed to get 1"-3" of snow tonight so I guess we won't see him for the rest of the week.

If you need me, I'll be at work...  ::)

We have someone like that but she's not on Facebook (as far as we know.) She has a crazy or melodramatic excuse for everything. Past favorites include:

*I can't stay late today, I've got to be home by 1 because workers are coming to fix our house. It's been tilting for a while and now it's to the point where things are rolling off the table. (?? And no, we do not live near a fault line :P)

*I can't come down to the remote office today, because it might snow and I have racing tires on my car. (on your station wagon?)

*I can't be to the meeting because my (35 year old) husband is sick and I have to stay with him.

*I'm not going to be in the office today because I rescued a squirrel. (wish I was kidding.)

*I can't download the file because my server connection is soooo slow, could someone please send me the printout through interoffice mail and I'll get to it when it arrives in 2 days? (Funny, nobody else in your office has this server problem...)

I think she's running out of excuses because her last "my work is going to be late" e-mail just said there were "all kinds of complicating factors". :P
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marcel

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Re: Professional Darwinism
« Reply #206 on: February 26, 2010, 10:19:17 AM »
Quote:
That reminds me of a mild Professional Darwinism. I say mild because I don't think the person saw it coming. Friend calls out of work for having the flu. Friend then gets 'caught' playing hooky and fired. Where did she get caught? In the drugstore getting medicine. Apparently a co-worker had gone there too at the same time and saw her, and didn't think she looked that sick while waiting in checkout for her medication. Friend got a call saying if she wanted to keep her job she had to come in. So she went in, for fear of losing her job, just to get fired for coming in sick.  ::) ETA: I should point out that they can actually do that due to the Health Hazard involved.

Unquote:

I don't completely understand how this is professional darwinism?  It seems much more like a very nasty catch-22 (sick enough to need meds so went to get them, told to come in since well enough to go out, fire because came in sick).  Could you explain your thinking?

I agree that this one sounds hinky. Let's say that I leave the office - say, last Friday, after ... um... losing my lunch. Does the fact that I later drag my yuggy self out of the house to replace the empty bottle of Pepto mean I'm not legit? Or am I ok because I look like death warmed over?


Well, as I said, Friend didn't look like death warmed over. I consider it a mild Darwinism because it was her decision  to go out while sick that ended up removing her from the Job Pool. Also since due to the job's nature was that coming into work was grounds for automatic firing, it wasn't the best idea of hers to go in.


It still sucks either way.
If you have to go out, you have to go out, whether you are sick or not. In this case it was medicine, personally I have gone out to get food while sick. It is not a choice to go out and get those things, it is a necessity.
If I was your friend, I would not have accepted it. If you force a sick person to come in, after she told you she is sick, then you can't fire her for coming in sick.
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kethria

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Re: Professional Darwinism
« Reply #207 on: February 26, 2010, 10:19:27 AM »
*I can't come down to the remote office today, because it might snow and I have racing tires on my car. (on your station wagon?)


Hey now... my 87 Reliant poopy-brown station wagon had Z-rated racing tires on it for years. :P

kingsrings

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Re: Professional Darwinism
« Reply #208 on: February 26, 2010, 11:07:16 AM »
I have been that person who has had to drag myself off to the store to get medicine and food when I’ve been home sick from work. Of course I didn’t want to and wasn’t well enough to, but I’ve been desperate and haven’t had a choice.

I have also used sick leave for ‘mental health’ days as well, although not a whole lot. There have been times when work has been such a truly toxic place that it was just better for me and everyone else to take a day off to recoup.

Namárië

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Re: Professional Darwinism
« Reply #209 on: February 26, 2010, 11:21:24 AM »
I don't understand how you would be disrespectful to your employer by taking a sick day and doing an errand or using the computer, no matter what Miss Manners says.

 I personally have no problem with people who use sick days solely for errands or other non-sickness related needs, as long as it doesn't get out of hand. Especially if it's set up in advance and coverage is arranged.

But if it's set up in advance and coverage is arranged, how can it be called a "sick day"? Paid time off or a vacation day, sure, but I never had a supervisor who would sanction a sick day when she knew full well it wasn't. And I never would have had the nerve to ask someone to cover for me and then use the day as sick time.

I used to work in a hospital, so when another nurse called in sick we were either scrambling for someone to cover her shift, or we were short staffed. I think it's one thing if you call in sick and the only one who suffers is you, because when you go back you have to make up for the work you didn't do, but when you leave your coworkers in the lurch, that's quite another.

At my current company we can use up to 24 hours of sick time as "personal days," which we can arrange in advance. I've never seen it anywhere else, though. It makes more sense to me to use vacation time, though.
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